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Full text of "Seamen's Journal (Sept.12,1917-Sept.4,1918)"

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INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-ONE 

SEPTEMBER 12, 1917-^SEPTEMBER 4, 1918 



All editorial matter is designated by an as- 
terisk (*). 

Title ■ No. Page 

A 

Air Mail Cost Small SO 10 

Alaska Bear, The 35 8 

Alaska Codtishcrmen's Agreement 35 7 

Alaska I'"ishernien's Agreement for Sea- 
son of 1918 2,3 1 

Alaska's Proud Record 39 11 

Alaska Reindeer Industry 1 11 

Alaska, The Natives of II II 

American Federation of Labor — 

Criticism of Mr. Gompcrs * I 6 

"57 Varieties" * 3 6 

Mr. Gompers' New Allies 7 2 

Proceedings of 37tli Annual Convention 11 1 
Travail of New h'rcedom (by Samuel 

Gompers) 32 9 

What We .Are Fighting For (by Sam- 
uel Gompers) ?,?, II 

Call for 38th Convention 7,7 3 

The .^. F. of L. Convention * 40 6 

Proceedings of 38tli Annual Convention 43 1 
.\. F. of L. Convention, Comment on. 43 6-8 
Secretary Wilson's Address at Con- 
vention 44 I 

Report of U. S. Labor Mission to 

Europe 45 1 

America's Population .\nalvzed (byChas. 

P. Steinnietz) ' 5 1 

Amundsen's New Cruise 32 9 

Ancient Mariners, P)ritis]i 40 . II 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Trouble for Wages by Law 2 3 

In the Land of "No .Strikes" * 2 7 

Can't-.Strike Plan Urged by Employers 6 3 

.\rbitration in France 36 9 

Adjustment of Disputes by Depart- 
ment of Labor 49 1 

Arbitration of Dispute Between Tug- 
boat Owners and Licensed Officers 

on San Francisco Bay 50 5 

Argentine Railroad Strike 19 9 

Army Transports, Meaning of * 8 6 

Army — See "War," etc 

Arizona Deiinrters Indicted 40 3 

.-\rt and the Masses 26 9 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

Chinese for U. S. Ships * 10 6 

Mr. Gary Wants Orientals 19 6 

Japanese Workers Need Help 20 2 

Japanese Steamsliip Service, New 30 9 

Chinese Crew for "Stanly Dollar." 

(Mr. Dollar Again) * 33 6 

More Imported (Tliinese ("Nanking") * 36 6 

Mr. Dollar's Chinese Crews * 48 7 

Japanese In The U. S. * 50 6 

.'>ee also "Court Decisions" on Chinese 

Crews 

Atlantic Coast Raided by Submarines... 40 14 

Atlantic, Wages on the* 3Z 6 

Atlantic Wage Scale, New * 38 6 

Australian Seamen, Etc. — 

Trouble for Wages by Law 2 3 

The Australian Strike * 5 6 

Queensland Labor Party Returned to 

Power Zl 4 



Title No. Page 

Australian Seamen's Journal * (a "Free" 

Lal)or Press) 50 7 

Unjust Accusations * 51 6 

Austria, Conditions In 39 9 

B 

Barry, J. H., Naval Officer, Comment on 

Mercliant-Seamen * 20 7 

Berlin, Bad News For 52 II 

Bisl)ce Outrage Condemned * 14 7 

•Bolsheviki Crew, A" 2Z II 

Bolsiicviki Rule in Russia * 29 6 

Booi'ncrang, Definition of 42 10 

Books, Tliree Useful * 43 7 

Borah's Historical Parallel 26 10 

Borneo, Timber in 52 8 

"llrains, .Superior" 29 7 

Bread Made With Sea-Water 12 9 

Bread Varieties 52 10 

liritisji Boycott on Germans (.\ Demand 

for the Truth) 10 10 

llritish Seamen to Boycott Germans... 42 3 
British Columbia .Shi])owners Increase 

Wages * 31 7 

British "Labor Party," The 35 9 

Britisli Lalior Party's Reconstruction 

Program 27 1 

British Labor's Parliament * 52 6 

British Marconi Wireless Co., Profits of 52 15 
Piritish Merchant Seamen's and Fisher- 
men's War .Service '. 31 I 

British Navy, The 51 9 

iiritisli Seamen's Loss of Elffects * 3i?i 7 

l^ritish Seamen's Wages * 18 6 

British L'nionists in .America 28 3 

Bunk Patriots 26 II 

Burial at Sea 28 11 

"Business Is Business" * 18 6 

C 

California's Beans ?i?i 11 

California's Farmer-Labor Alliance *.... 7 6 

California's F"armer-Labor Alliance 22 1 

California's Farmer-Labor Platform 38 11 

California's Metal Output 21 13 

California Primary Election Returns *... 52 7 
California State Federation of Labor 

Con\ention 6 I 

Camoullaging of Shipping Board's Ves- 
sels 50 14 

Caspian Sea, On the 40 1 

Chantie Man, An Official * 21 7 

Ch.antey .Singing 27 11 

Cheai> Labor, The Cry For * 16 7 

Child Labor Hurtful 15 3 

Child Labor Law Declared Unconstitu- 
tional 48 1 

Cliinese — See- '"Asiatics" 

Ciiurcb, Mission of The (by tiie Rev. 

Chas. Stelzle) 29 9 

Church Members, Total Number in U.S. ?i7 13 

Churcli Proijerty in U.S., Value of 5 13 

Citizenship Denied Striking b'oreigner . . . 7 3 

"Civilian Gun Crews" * 12 6 

Classes, The Conflict of 41 9 

Clii5i)cr .Ships, Famous 28 2 

Coal From Spitzbergen 20 15 

Collins, Nelson, on U. S. Merchant 

Seamen * 34 6 

Color Blindness * _. 47 7 

Compensation Laws — See "Workmen's 

Compensation" 

Comnliment to Merchant Seamen by 

Secretary of War * 50 6 



'I'itle No. Page 
Concrete Ships — 

Concrete .'^hips * 23 7 

"Faith," Launching of* 28-7; 29-5 

Inspection of "Faith" 32 5 

Tests of "Faitii" 34-5; 36-5 

Keel for First Irish Concrete Vessel.. 35 15 
Concrete Shipbuilding Plant for Oak- 
land, Cal 37 5 

The Stone Ship "Faith" * 2,7 6 

"Faith" .Arrives at Puget Sound 39 5 

More Concrete Sliips * 39 6 

San Diego's Concrete Shipbuilding 

Plant Opened '. 49 5 

Report on CJriginal Voyage of "Faith" 50 7 

"Constitutional Rights" * 20 7 

Convicts for War Work 16 3 

Convoy System, The 46 II 

Co-operation and Results * 17 6 

Co-operation, The Need For 22 1 

Co-oi)erative Movement, The 42 1 

Co-oi)eration Abroad 48 9 

Copenhagen, Shii^ping at 30 9 

Copjier liarons Grilled 35 10 

Cotton Statistics 30 10 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

.Seamen's Riglit to Discliarge. * Opin- 
ion of Judge Neterer 5 6 

Pay for Overtime Work 8 11 

"Mackinaw's" Chinese Crew * (U. S. 
Supreme Court Decision, Scharren- 
berg vs. Dollar Steamship Co.) 9 6 

Chinese for U. S. Ships (.Supreme Court 
Decision, .Scharrenberg vs. Robert 
Dollar Steamship Co.) II 7 

Rule of Reason, Another Supreme 

Court Decision on Chinese Crews *. 11 7 

-A "Rule of Reason" Analyzed. Su- 
preme Court Decision on Chinese 
Crews 12 1 

U. S. .Supreme Court Favors "Open 
.Shop" (Hitchman Coal Co. vs. 
United Mine Workers) 16 7 

Dama.ges for Improper Medical Treat- 
ment ("S. C. .Sladc") 20 10 

The Fellow Servant Rule (Dunwoody 

vs. tiie S.S. "Colusa") 24 1 

Damages for Failure to Give Proper 
Medical Care (Wright vs. Clyde 
-Steamship Co.) 24 2 

Brief on Illegality of .Advance Wages 
to Seamen in Foreign Ports ('"Wind- 
rush" and "Rhine") 26 1 

.Seaman Entitled to Safe -Appliances 

(Corrado vs. Pedersen) 28 1 

Working Hours of Mess Boy (Petter- 

son vs. "Royal Arrow") 28 1 

Advance in Foreign Ports (Prevailing 
and Dissenting Opinions in "Rhine" 
and "VN'indrush" Cases) 29 1 

I'^fiicienc}' of .Section 4530 of -Seamen's 
Act (by S. B. Axtell) 29 9 

0\ ertime Payment in Port (S. S. 
"Mongolia") 29 11 

Rights of Tniured Seaman (Olaf Her- 
man vs. "Emily F. Whitney") 31 7 

Brutal Master h'ined (Master of French 

S.S. '"I^ole" lined bv Judge Chatfield) 31 II 

U. S. Supreme Court Grants Writ in 

"Rhine" and "Windrush" Cases 32 2 

Seaman Recovers Damage for Injury 
-Although Partly at Fault (Schnoor 
vs. "Chase S. Osborn") 34 7 

Against Improved Forecastles (De- 
cision of U. S. Circuit Court of Ap- 



.......... . : •(-•^".^gY* SEAMEXS lOLRXAL IXDEX— \OLUME TI11RTV-C)XE 



TitlQ 



:iiitf.*j>4g«. 



peals) 34-7;* 

Award for Food Sliortage ('"Costa 

Rica") . 36 

Seamen"? Kight to Maintenance and 

Cure (Ferguson vs. "Vestris") 38 

Seamen's Ris'it to Recover Damages 
Limited liy Suiirciiie Court (Chelentis 

vs. Luckcnbacli ."steamship Co.) 42 

L'. S. Supreme Court Denies Sea- 
men's Right to .Appeal in Appellate 

Courts Without Costs 42 

Seamen's Ri,Ljht to '"Dry"' Sleeping 
Quarters (W'm. Wells vs. "Sher- 
man" ) 43 

Appellate Courts Open to Seamen 

Without Bonds, Etc. * 44 

Seamen's Right to Appeal (by Attor- 
ney .Axtell) 47 

"Hardy" Salvage Case 51 

"Eastland" Victims Lose in Federal 

Court 52 

Court Raps Shipowners * (Wreck of 

"Santa Rosa") 25 

Cradles or Coffins? SO 

"Creed, The Americans' " ^7 

Crimping in I'oreign Ports (by Silas B. 

Axtetl) 16 

Crimps Still In Business? (l>y S. Alex- 

anderson) 21 

Crippled, Helping the * 47 

Criticism of Mr. Gompers *. . 1 

Curse of the Press 26 



Demobilization Problems * 36 

Democracv or Destruction (by Frank I'. 

Walsh) 52 

Distorting Tlic News * ("Stanley Dol- 
lar's" Chinese Crew) 34 

Dollar, Mr., Again * (Chinese Crew for 

"Stanley Dollar") 33 

Dollar's (Captain) Humor* 52 

Dover, The Straits of 17 

Dutch Seamen Commended 48 

Dutch Seamen Well Treated by U. S. 

(An Unfoimded Api)rehension *) . . . . 42 
Dutch Vessels Taken Over by U. S. (A 
Timely Acquisition *) 29 



Earnings vs. Wages 

Earth's Ice .Xges 

Economic Intiuiry* 

I'.ight-Hour Workday, The * 

"Emergency Ships"* 

EmployiTient Service of Dept. of Labor 

Enemy Alien Defined 

F.ncmy Property, Custody of 

Eskimos, Blond 

Involution In Government 

Expense of Family Doubled Since 1900.. 
F 

Fabricated Ships 

Famines in India 

I'amous Clipper Ships 

l-'arin Labor in Russia 

Fettering Free Speech * 

I'eudalism, The New 

I'inland's New Flag 

I'inland, New Flag of 

I'iiin. Struggles of the 



52 
29 
. 5 
8 
28 
49 
22 
34 
35 
52 
34 

18 
23 
28 
17 
12 
11 
32 
52 
42 



9 

7 

9 
10 

10 

6 
3 
7 

10 

9 
6 
6 
2 



6 

1 

6 

6 

6 

11 

2 

6 

6 



3 
8 
6 
7 
6 
1 
9 
11 
11 
9 
3 

9 
8 
2 

11 

6 

,9 

11 

14 

9 



Fisheries, Etc — 

-•^ea I'ood. New Type of 12 2 

Russia's Catch of Fisit 12 S 

New Fisheries Products * 24 7 

I''isherics Dispute Settled * 28 7 

Alaska Fishermen's Agreement for 

Season of 1918 ?ii \ 

Codtishermen s Agreement 35 7 

Bread Made from Fish 45 8 

Whaling Interests of British Columbia 

Consolidated 50 5 

Prices for Canned Salmon 51 5 

Fish and Ocean Currents 52 10 

Fleets Behind the Fleet (British Mer- 
chant Seamen's and F'ishermen's 

War Service) 31 1 

Fly, How High Can Men? 10 2 

FVench Socialists' -Attitude on Interna- 
tional Labor Parley 48 7 

I'ood and Housing Problems 46 7 

Food Heater for Lifeboats 43 11 

Foul Forecastles Blot on U. S. Ships.. 39 3 

I'orecastles, Better * 6 6 

F'ourth of July. Celel)rating the 43 6 

I'rankfurter. Felix, Appointed to War 

Labor Policies Board * ?i7 6 

Free Ports and Free Seas 4 7 

Free Schools for Seamen * 2 6 

Frcnili Seamen's .Arbitration of Disputes 36 9 
Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by — 

F'.volving Bantams from Men 2 7 

Address at W'ashington Conference.. 5 8,9 

Furuseth on Preparedness 19 2 

Na^al vs. Merchant Seamen (Brief on 

the Manning Problem) 21 1 

Furuseth's Repoi;t 24-2: 30-2 

Petition to President on Manning of 

U. S. Ships 25 1 

Letter to Senator Robert L. Owens.. 32 1 



'"fiarabed" Princinle Not Sound 45 9 

German Navy's Brutality 31 2 



Title No. Page 

Germany, A Debate In 42 8 

Germiiiiy. Shipbuilding in 52 9 

Germany's Future 45 9 

Girl Sea Captain 26 9 

Gold Dredges Operated in Alaska 20 5 

(jompers, Criticism of * 1 6 

(iovernment-Owned Ships * 15 6 

Great Lakes — 

Steel Trust Forcing Trouble * 4 7 

Steel Trust Deliance * 5 6 

Lake Carriers Welfare Plan (Investi- 
gation by v. S. Dept. of Labor).. 8 1 

Steel Trust Patriotism * 12 6 

Shipments of Ore from Lake Superior 21 14 

Great Lakes Shipping * 22 7 

Lake Carriers "Hellfare" Plan 29 8 

Centenary, .\n Unnoted (Rush-Bagot 
Arrangement; no warships on Great 

Lakes) 32 2 

Blacklisting Must Cease * 37 7 

Steel Trust Defiance (by Victor A. 

Olandcr) 37 11 

Vessel Owners Scored 39 10 

Steel Trust Tactics * 44 6 

Great Lalccs Strike Vote 44 7 

U. S. Employment .Agencies Favored * 44 7 
ln\estigalion and Report of Welfare 

plan by U. S. Dept. of Labor 47 1 

Lakes Strike .Averted * 47 6 

Lake Seamen Win* 48 6 

Great Lakes Settlement, The 51 1 

Record Movement of Iron Ore 52 14 

Greek Merchant Marine 50 9 

Greeley's Wise Advice 13 11 

Guggenhimc's Paradise 43 2 

H 

Hate, The Gospel of * 17 6 

Hawaiian Volcanoes 48 11 

Health Insurance — 

.Argument by Daniel C. Murphy 9 7 

Cost of Insurance, The * 11 6 

Loss F>om Sickness 20 10 

Health Laws Urged 29 3 

Health Insurance 31 2 

Abuse Is No Argument * Z2 7 

Against Health Insurance 32 11 

Health Insurance Indorsed 34 10 

Health and the War 39 1 

Social Health Insurance 40 9 

Reasons for Health Insurance (by 

Richard Caverly) 47 11 

Seamen's Health Insurance * 49 7 

Hebrides, The Outer 24 10 

'"He Never Struck" (by the Rev. Chas. 

Stelzle) 12 9 

Hog, In Defense of the 36 2 

Holland's Ships, Care of 47 3 

Housing Shipyard Workers 27 7 

Hyphens, No More 49 9 

I 

Immigration, Etc. — 

-America's Population .Analyzed 5 1 

.Arrivals at Port of New York 6 4 

Immigrants and Trade Unions 9 2 

The New Arrivals * 18 6 

Illiteracy in America 34 3 

I ncomes, F'acts on 47 10 

Increased Product From Shorter Work- 
day 30 1 

Increase in Wages for Pacific Seamen 

and .Alaska Fishermen * 30 7 

India. Famines in 23 8 

India, Shipbuilding in 18 10 

Indictment of ""The System" (by Prof. 

Carleton H. Parker) 12 7 

Industrial Unrest Defined 20 1 

Inland Fleet. Our Growing 37 2 

Inland Waterways, Our * 49 6 

Injunctions, Government by. Etc. — 

Picketing Legal in .Arizona 33 10 

The Injunction Once More 35 9 

International Labor Parley, The 48 7 

International Labor Relations, Report of 

U. S. Labor Mission to Europe 45 1 

Internationalism Exemplified* 10 6 

"In the King's (New) Name" 7 2 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

See '"Training Seamen," etc 

See "U. S. Merchant Alarine," "U. S. 
Shipping Board," etc 

See "'Washington Conference" on Co- 
operation to Win the War 

Secretary Hanson's Report 10 7 

Seamen's Act Reviewed (bv James IT. 

Williams) ." 13 1 

Seamen's Law Defended (bv Silas B. 

Axtell) ■ 13 2 

Proceedings of 21st .Annual Conven- 
tion 14-1; 15-1: 16-1 

Secretary Hanson's Report to Buffalo 

Convention 14 8 

President Furuseth's Report to Buffalo 

Convention 14 1 

The "Cal' to the Sea" 15 8-0 

Seamen's Call to Seamen * 16 6 

Seamen's Service in the War (Address 

at A. F. of L. Convention) 18 1 



Title No. Page 

Seamen's Service in the War (Lest 

We Forget*) 19 6 

Training American L'.oys * 20 6 

The Manning Problem Solved * 21 6 

Seamen's Law Violated (From Crew 

of S. S. "Silver Shell") 23 2 

The Call of "'Old Briny"* 24 6 

I'etition to President on Manning 25 1 

"Service," A Call to * 30 6 

The Call to the Sea * 31 6 

War Service Under the Seamen's Act. Z2 1 

-Seamen Under Military Law * 32 6 

-Seamen's War Service * Z2 6 

The U. S. .Merchant Seamen* (Views 

of Mr. Nelson Collins) 34 6 

Conference at Capital* (Under Aus- 
pices of U. .S. Shipping Board) 34 7 

The W'ashington Conference * 35 6 

"A Message to Seamen"* 38 6 

Seamen's Law Praised * (by John D. 

Barry) 40 6 

"'I-'irst Things First!" * 43 6 

Seamen's Identification * 44 6 

Clouds on the Horizon * 45 6 

Inside Information * 46 6 

Shipping Board Instructions * 49 6 

Training Merchant Seamen (by Henry 

Howard) 50 1 

Call of the Sea, The * 51 6 

"It All Depends On— " * 2 6 

I. W. W.'s vs. Straight Unionism (by 

Jay Fox) 2 9 

I. W. W. Fallacies (by Jay Fox) 1 9 

J 

Japanese — See '"Asiatics" 

John Doe, A. B. (by F. H. Buryeson)... 22 2 
Johnson. Hiram W., Senator, Introduces 

Seamen's Compensation Bill 33 7 

K 

Kern, Senator, Biography of 17 2 

Knocker, The 52 2 

L 

Labor and the War (Placing the Re- 
turned Soldier on the Land) 37 1 

Labor Day, 1918 * 50 6 

Labor Power, The Cost of 22 7 

Labor Press, The (by the Rev. Chas. 

Stelzle) - 22 9 

Labor Press, A "Free" * SO 7 

Labor' Turnover, The (by Chas. W. 

Wood) 17 1 

Labor Unrest, Report on * 26 6 

Lady Dock Wallopers 46 10 

La Follettc (by .Mark Sullivan) 3 9 

La l-'ollette's (Senator) Future 19 9 

La b'ollette's Vindication 45 7 

Land — See also "Taxation" 

Land. Back to the * 39 6 

Land Ownership in America 23 7 

"Law of Wages," Is There a? 24 11 

Leathers I'rom New Sources 29 9 

Lest We Forget * 19 6 

Liberia 16 9 

Liberty Bonds Purchased by Pacific 

Coast Marine Unions * 33 7 

Liberty Loan Facts * 6 7 

Lifeboats. Paper 43 9 

Lifeboats, Food Heater for 43 11 

l.ind, John, Biographical Sketch * 20 6 

Locomotive, Most Powerful 36 8 

Look Astern, A * 14 6 

Loyalty, The Test of 8 11 

Lynchings in the L'nited States 21 13 

M 

Macarthur's Handbook, Third Edition*. 43 7 

Mail FVom "Over There'' * SO 7 

Mail by Aeroplane 36 2 

Manning of Ships — See also "Training".. 

Manning Our Ships (From the Public).. 30 7 

Manning Problem, Our * 28 6 

Manila, Shipping at 24 9 

Man Power 45 11 

-Maritime Court Decisions — See "Court 

Decisions'' 

Mark Twain's Loyalty 19 2 

Merchant Marine, Our New * 25 6 

Merchant Marine — See also "International 

Seamen's Union" 

Merchant Seamen Complimented by 

Secretary of War * 50 6 

Mexican's Homeward March, The 10 1 

Mexican Labor Admitted to U. S 44 10 

Mcxican-U. S. Labor Pact 48 3 

Millionaires Increase 1.5 11 

Miners. \Vhere They Stand * 35 ft 

"•-Mittel-luiropa" 39 9 

Mob, Furv of the 36 10 

Mob Rule, Who Incites? 37 9 

Mob Spirit Denounced by President 

Wilson 49 7 

Mooney Trial, Etc. — See San Francisco. 

Mother, Don't Forget * 4 7 

Mukden 41 11 

Muzzling the Truth (-Scott Nearing) . . . . 4 9 

Mystery of the ""Cyclops" 34 10 

N 

National Maritime Spirit, A * .^ 6 

Name, What's In a? * 35 6 

Naturalization, Bureau of 49 2 



ogp^O 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-ONE 



Title No. 

Naturalization. Facts About 45 

Naturalization Law, New * 45 

Navy — See U. S. Navy 

News, Printing tlie (by Jay Fox) 24 

Non-1'arti.san League, The 48 

Norway s Heavy Losses 37 

O 

Obsolescent Sea Terms * 42 

Olfl Age and Contentment (by Geo. S. • 

Barry) 9 

Old Thrones 2 

Oregon State Federation of Labor Con- 
vention 21 

Orientals — .See ''Asiatics" 

Orientals, Mr. Gary Wants * 19 

Our Home "Is" On the Deep * 12 

Our Washington Letter (by Laurence 
Todd). See issues 1 to 52. 

P 

Pacific Coast Shipbuilding * 31 

Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Farn- 

ings * 1 

Page, Chas. R., of San Francisco, Ap- 
pointed to U. S. Shipping Board.... 

Panama Canal — 

Ships Making Transit During Fiscal 

Year .....■: 3 

Telephones in Use on Canal System.. 36 

"Panama" Salvage Case 49 

Paper Lifeboats 43 

Pearl Fisherv, An Ancient 35 

Pearl Harbo'r Dry Dock * . . 30 

Pershing Commends Seamen * 33 

Pension Rejected for Compensation Plan 1 

People's Self-Government 1 

Philosophy of Frank P. Walsh 50 

Physical Standards 24 

Pilots' L^nion, An Early 16 

Pitcairn Island People Happy 3 

Plea for the L'norganized (by J. B. Dale) 32 

Poetry — 

No Enemies (by Chas. Mackay) 2 

The Famine (by R. J. Cassidy) 16 

Slaverv Aint of Any Color (by James 

Russell Lowell) 23 

Not In Uniform (by An Unknown 

Author) 45 

Poisoned Sea, A 20 

Porto Ricans for U. S 39 

Poverty of the Masses 12 

Power of Organization * 15 

Profiteering (by Senator La Follctte) . . . 40 
Profits of British Marconi Wireless 

Company 52 

Progress vs. Prussianism 37 

Property and War * (Charles Schwab's 

Statement) 22 

Prussia Rules Germany 24 

Punishing Deserters * 6 

Punta .\renas 13 

Q 

Queliec Bridge, The 9 

R 

Railroad Wages, Adjustment of 41 

Reaction, The Spirit of * 36 

Recruiting Seamen * 18 

Red Cross. Give to the * 37 

Rent Profiteering 43 

Report on Labor Unrest * 26 

Rhine, The 12 

Riveting Records, Facts on 43 

Rolpli I'or Governor * 50 

Rolph Shipyard, First Launching, "Con- 
queror" 25 

Roumania's Destitution 52 

Rubin. W. B., Articles by— 

Law is Law (Scharrenberg vs. Dollar 

Steamship Co.) 21 

Pity the Scab 27 

Capture the Constitution! 31 

The Injunction Once More 35 

Precedent-Bound 36 

Contempt of Court 37 

Oh, Ye Judges! 38 

Who Is An American? 40 

A Judicial Guess 46 

A Judicial .'\nachronism 48 

Labor Day, 1918 51 

[Russian Shipping 43 

Russia's Catch of Fish 12 

Riits 23 

S 

Sabota.ge, Practical 27 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Delegates' Report (California State 

Federation of Labor) 6 

Delegates' Report (Or State Federa- 
tion of Labor) 21 

Is This Fair Play? * (Misstatements 

bv Shipowners' Official Organ) 22 

The Sixth of March * 26 

Revised Constitution Adopted 26 

Lorentzen, F. J. D., .\bcrdcen Agent, 



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Title No. Page 

Death of * ' 30 6 

Increase for Seamen in British Co- 
lumbia * 31 7 

Maritime Hall Association (Financial 

Statement) 32 11 

Purchase of Liberty Bonds* 33 7 

Delegates' Report (Washington State 

Federation of Labor) 45 2 

Eight- Hour Workday on Steam- 
Schooners * 47 6-7 

Eight-Hour Workday Established by 

I'acilic Steamship Co. * 48 6 

Twenty-five Years Ago * 48 7 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Abraliamsen, Aslak 34 7 

Amundsen, Oscar 2 7 

Andersen, Carl Philip 44 7 

Andersen, Nils E 10 7 

Anderson, Johan F 31 7 

Antrcsson, Kustav 49 7 

Appel, August 19 7 

Ballard, Peter 3 7 

Bendixen, Nicolai 29 7 

Berger, Johan Herman 29 7 

Berntsen, Julius A 48 7 

Berry, Edward V 29 7 

Bohm, John F 35 7 

Bolt, Tony 16 7 

Bradley, William 52 7 

Campbell, H 38 7 

Carlson, Ivlward 25 7 

Collins, Pete 35 7 

Comstedt, Johan Conrad 1 7 

Corrigan, Patrick Joseph 33 7 

Crealy, Thomas Alfred 34 7 

Edstr'om, Hans M 31 7 

Ekberg, Axel Wilhelm 1 7 

Engstroni, lirnest Marcus 31 7 

Erickson, Carl Wm 22 7 

Erickson, Victor 51 7 

Fricke, Wilhelm Ludwig Fritz 32 7 

Gunderscn, Martin 15 7 

Ham, Harry F 49 7 

Hansen, h'rederick Carl Christian 22 7 

Hei!)erger, Morgan 10 7 

Herlitz, Knut 6 7 

Higgens, Harry 23 7 

Hopland. Peter 23 7 

Horhjem, Olaf 11 7 

Jacobscn, Rasmus John 22 7 

Jensen, Hans 30 7 

Johnsen, Rasmus 24 7 

Johnson, Chas 48 7 

Johnson, Fritz 2 7 

Johnson, Oscar 10 7 

Killstrom, Thomas 32 7 

Klick, Albert 47 7 

Laine, F"rans W 47 7 

Langvvardt, Hans Christian 33 7 

Lefcvre, William 9 7 

Lenike, H 12 7 

Lidstrom, A. E 42 7 

Find wall, Richard K 31 7 

Lorentzen, E. J. Darney 29 7 

INladden, Joseph 39 7 

Maisit, Bernard 47 7 

Marquis, George 47 7 

Mattson, Edward 1 7 

Menjohanns, Karl F. A 21 7 

Nilsen, Sevcrin M 23 7 

Nilson. N. G 11 7 

Norling, Erick '. 47 7 

Nortin, George 6 7 

Nyman, Victor Alfred... 26 7 

Olscn, Peter Thilo 24 7 

Panny, Anton 30 7 

Petersen, Anton 42 7 

Peterson, Oscar 1' 51 7 

Petterson, Knut B 42 7 

Petterson, Oscar 6 7 

Renter, Ernest Constantine Hansen... 4 7 

Richard, James 47 7 

Riemers, Johannes 35 7 

Schnee, Martin 15 7 

Scoby, John C 10 7 

Smith, Douglas S 40 7 

Smith, James 11 7 

Stein, Albert 47 7 

Strasdin, A. W 23 7 

Svensson, Carl 39 7 

Thoresen, Engvald 40 7 

Watt, Thos..." 44 7 

Willnard, John Fredrick 34 7 

Wilson, Albert 27 7 

Winter, G 12 7 

Salvage Work, Efficient 50 9 

Salving U-Boat Victims 41 9 

San Francisco — 

"Law and Order" Slush Fund Repudi- 
ated * 10 7 

Recall FickertI * 13 6 

The Bay of San Francisco 14 7 

Aftermath of the Recall *. 19 6 

Is Labor For Labor? (Fickert Recall 

Flection) 19 10 

.San Francisco's Gold Mine * 21 6 

Mooney Persecution, The * 21 7 

Mooney, Shall He Hang^ *.. 26 7 

Training Ship for San Francisco *.... 29 6 

The .Seamen's Institute * 35 6 

Mooney Case Near the End * 46 7 

Mooney and the .Supreme Court 50 10 

Saragossa Sea, The 18 11 

Sea Battle, A Four-Hour (J. L. Luck- 



Title No. Page 

enbach) 20 7 

Sea Gulls as Scavengers 35 2 

Seamanship, Teaching * 23 7 

Seamen and the Income Tax * 23 6 

Seamen Commended by General Per- 
shing * 33 6 

Seamen's Act — See "International Sea- 
men's Union" 

Seamen's Chances for Advancement 49 11 

Seamen's Citizenship 16 9 

.Seamen's Compensation — See Workmen's 

Compensation 

Seamen's Effects, Loss of * 33 7 

Seamen's Identification Cards 39 11 

Seamen's Journal — 

Seamen's Journal, Change of Name*.. 31 6 

Our "Universal Plea" 35 9 

Business Manager Holt Obtains En- 
sign's Commission in Naval Re- 
serve * • 47 7 

Seamen's War Risk Insurance * 39 6 

Seamen's War Risk Insurance * 41 6 

Seamen's War Service * 32 6 

Sea Training and Submarines * 39 6 

Selling Titles In England 13 7 

Shark, Smoked, As War Ration 31 2 

Shii)building In Germany 52 9 

Shipbuilding In India 18 10 

.Shipbuilding, Progress of * 20 6 

Shipbuihling Records * 45 6 

Sh.iijbuilding, The Future of * 49 6 

Shipping Board — See "U. S. Shipping 

Board" 

.Ships, Famous Clipper 28 2 

.Ships, Shortage of * 27 6 

Shipyard Workers, Housing the 27 7 

Shipyard Workers, The 49 9 

Shortage of Ships, The * 27 6 

Siberia and the Future 22 2 

"Sink Without Trace" * 2 6 

Slurring American Seamen * 1 6 

Solar System, The 20 9 

.Soldier's Chances, The 45 9 

Soldier's Vote. The 19 8 

Soldier Vote, The 52 11 

South African Shipping 45 2 

Southern California Harbors IS 7 

Speedy Windjammers '*' 13 7 

Spirit of the Times, The * 32 6 

Standard of Living, The * 4 6 

Standard Ships, What Are? 39 7 

Starving the Innocents 20 11 

.States and the LTnion 10 9 

Starting New Countries Right 24 11 

-Steel Industry to Be Organized 51 . 3 

Stefansson Vilhjalmur, Arrival at Fort 

Yukon * 19 6 

Strike and Lockout Not Identical 39 3 

Strike-Breakers Eliminated 52 9 

Stretching the Pav ICnvelope 23 1 

Submarines, Our Fleet of 28 9 

Submarine, Catching Up With the 35 1 

Submarine .Surface Fighting 51 7 

Submarine Warfare * 37 7 

Submarine Warfare * 7 6 

Subscri])tions to Second Liberty T,oan... 10 13 

Suez and Panama Traffic 16 8 

.Suez Canal, Ships Passing Through 9 15 

Supreme Court Shows Bias 25 7 

T 

Talking to Non-L^nionists * 19 7 

Taxation, Single Tax, Etc. — 

Getting on the Land * 3 7 

Tiicome Tax on Workers * 11 7 

Idle Land a Serious Problem 18 10 

Seamen and the Income Tax * 23 6 

Single Tax I'avored by Brisbane 25 11 

T,and-Hog Again, The * 27 6 

Maior-General Black's Rent 37 10 

Dear Land vs. Humanity 39 2 

A Convert to Georgeism 42 9 

Putting Idle Land to Work 50 2 

After the Land-Hogs * 52 6 

Ta.x on Alien Seamen 43 11 

Thrift and Labor 45 2 

Time- Keeping at Sea 45 11 

Trade Statistics, Foreign 46 9 

Trainincr American -Seamen (by James H. 

Williams) '. ^ 1 

Training of Seamen * 13 6 

Ton Has Different Meaning 34 11 

Tonnage, What Is? 50 11 

Trade Union Activity 52 2 

Transportation Marvel. A * 51 7 

Tuscania, Sinking of the * 23 6 

u 

U-Boat — See ".Submarine" 

Union Printer's Travels. A 46 10 

Useful "Two-Thirds." The * 17 7 

U. S. Crews for U. S. Ships 2 1 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 45 10 

U. S. Department of Labor, Work of... 49 1 

U. -S. I'^mployment -Service 49 10 

U. -S. Government Insurance * 30 6 

U. S. Liberty Loans. The .SO 9 

U. S. Merchant Marine (Chronology)... 37 7 

U S.-Mexico Labor Pact 48 3 

IT. S. Mints, Work of the 47 10 

V. S. Navy, Growth of 45 2 

L^ S. Navy League Head Quits 21 10 



COAST SEAMEN'S lOlRX \I, INDEX— \( )LL:.M1-: TH1HTV-() NI-: 



Title No. Page 

U. S. Navy's Progress Summarized 17 7 

U. S. Sabotage Act 36 7 

U. S. Sail Tonnage, New * 38 6 

U. S. Self-Insurance * 52 7 

U. S. Shipping Hoard's Plans * 16 6 

U. S. Shipping Board, The 31 11 

U. S. Shipping Board, Work of the 33 9 

U. S. Shipping Facts (An Interesting 

Address*) 41 6 

U S. Shipping Losses 37 9 

U. S. Steamboat Inspection Service 19 7 

U. S. Thought Controller. The (Post- 
master-General Burleson) 7 1 

U. S. Treasury, Work of the 44 11 

U. S. W.-ir Labor Board Meets * 35 7 

U. S. War Labor Board, Principles and 

-Standards I'"nunciattd by 38 1 

V 

Vacant Lands in California 19 13 

Venereal Diseases (The Fnemy at Home) 44 9 

Venetia's History 10 9 

Voc.iiional Rehal)ilitation 47 7 

Volcanoes of I lawaii 48 11 

W 

Wages vs. Prices 23 9 

Walsh, Frank P., Philosophy of -SO 7 

Wanted — ^Labor Missionaries (by Dr. N. 

Krishna) 25 11 

Washington Letter, Our (by Laurence 

Todd). See issues 1 to 52. 

Washington Conference on Co-operation 
to Win the War. .Addresses deliv- 
ered by — 

Brown, Gustav H 5 11 

Chamberlain. E. T 3 2 

Conway, Clement 7 10 

Davis, Ulster 2-2; 8-8 

De Milnc, Mr 8 8 

Krickson. E. A 6 8 

Evans, Capt. Irving 1 5 7 

Flynn, Patrick 6 9 

Franklin. Mr 3 10 

Furuseth, Andrew 2-2; 5-8, 9 

Gibson, Bruce 4 2 

Gibson, lames S 2 1 

Gill, P. B 6 9 

Grange, David E 6 9 

Gray, Cantain A. N 7 11 

Griffin, 11. P 5-8; 6-8 

Libby, Frank 5 11 

McGlinchev, T. J 6 10 

Miller, Walter P 2 2 

Olander, Victor A 6 10 

Plummcr, Edward C 7 10 

Pryor. Percy J 5 10 

Putnam, Mr 4 11 

Redheld, Secretary 2-10; 3-2: 4-10 

Terriberry, Geo. H 8 8 

Uhlcr, Geo. C 4 10 

Westcott. Capt. Wm. .\ 3 1 

White, F. M 3 2 

Wilson. Secretary 2-1; 5-8; 8-9 

York, Herman 6 8 

Waterfront a Battle Front 17 9 

War Savings * ».. 19 7 

^^'ar Savings Day * 42 6 

\\'ar Work and Union Standards (by 

Samuel Gompers) 1 1 



Title No. 

War, Militarism, Etc. — 

"Sink Without Trace" * 2 

War Profits * 3 

Peace Based Upon Justice * 4 

L'ncle Sam Getting Ready * 6 

"Antilles," U. S. Transport, Subma- 
rined 7 

.M.)b Rule * 11 

E.xemption for Seamen * 17 

Sane Views on Peace (British Labor 

Party's Reconstruction Policy) 18 

Terms of a World Peace (by Lincoln 

Colcord) 19 

Licbknecht, The Prophet 19 

U. S. 'Thrift Stamps" 20 

How to Win the V\'ar 20 

1917 War Summaries 20 

War Insurance E.\tended * 21 

La1>or and the War 24 

On "I^ro-Germans" 26 

Reconstruction Program of British 

Labor Party 27 

Seamen Under .Military Law * 32 

Custody of Enemy Property 34 

Catching L^p With the Submarine 35 

.An Appeal to the World's Workers... 36 

War Savings -Stamps * 36 

The "Peoples' Armies" 36 

U. S. Draft Law Upheld by Supreme 

Court 37 

Problem of the Crippled (by A. J. 

Pillsbury) .38 

The Nation's War Debts 41 

Cost of the War 43 

The V.m\ of the Tether * 43 

"(letting Into Position" 44 

New Defensive Sea Area 44 

War Risk Bureau, Work of * 45 

Scavengers of Civilization (War Prof- 
iteers ) 46 

The Bridge Across * 46 

Enemy Submarine Bases 46 

Flighting Chances * 47 

War Risk E.xtended 48 

\\:\r Work of Department of Labor.. . 49 
This War Is Labor's War (by John 

P. Frey) 52 

Deiining War Aims (by E. B. Arm- 
strong) 52 

Washington State Federation of Labor 

Con\ention 45 

W;ilson, William B. * _ 7 

Wireless. .Marconi Company's, Profits of 52 

Wooden Shipbuilding .34 

Wooden Ships * 12 

Woman Suffrage Carried in New York.. 13 

Wonian Suffrage Gains .39 

Working Class Initiative 36 

Workmen's Compensation — See also 
"Court Decisions." 

Seamen's Accident Insurance * 1 

Compensation Laws, The * 6 

The Compensation Question (by E. R. 

Wall) 8 

.'^camen Denied Compensation * 27 

Seamen's Status Under State Compen- 
sation Laws (A Correction*) 29 

State Compensation Funds 30 

-Seamen's Compensation Bill Introduced 

by -Senator Hiram W. Johnson*.... 33 
The I'ederal Seamen's Compensation 



Page 



6 
6 
6 
6 

15 
6 
7 



1 
11 
2 
8 
10 
6 
7 
2 

1 

6 



/ 
11 
2 
6 
6 
11 
6 

1 
6 
9 
6 
11 
1 

7 

11 

2 
6 
15 
8 
7 

13 
10 
10 



Title No. Piige 

Bill ( Verbatim Copy) 34 1 

Workers' .AfHuencel, The * 8 6 

Wrecks— 

A. B. Johnson 10 5 

.\ctaeon 14 13 

Admiral Evans 29 5 

Aerial 18 14 

.Alice Knowles 6 5 

AUKi 9-5; 20-5 

-Amhirox 16 15 

.Antilles 7 15 

Asconia 43-14: 51-15 

.\usonia 43 14 

.Australia 45 14 

Bear 1 5 

Blanche Fl. Pendleton 14 5 

l'.otnia 16 15 

I'.oxcr 27 14 

Calgarian 30 2 

Caroline 12 5 

Ceferino 27 14 

Chattahoochee 31 14 

Cheviot Range 41 14 

City i.f .Athens 35 14 

Corona 10 5 

Cyclops 34 10 

Desmond 16 14 

h'.buroon 12 14 

I'.xpansion 44 5 

Florizel 25 14 

Gray 8 5 

(nit Heil 18 14 

Kentra 28 5 

Kio Ora 6 14 

Ixringsjaa 43 14 

Ixristianiafjord 4 14 

I.adv Houghton 46 14 

Lake .Moro 33 IS 

I.casowe Castle 42 14 

.Makukona 21 5 

Manila 10 5 

.Manx King 47 14 

Mariposa 11-5; 14-5: 45-5 

M arosa 47 14 

Matunga 13 14 

McCulloch •. 29 5 

Moldavia 38 IS 

New Haven 43 14 

Northern Lights 12 14 

Oakland 21 S 

I'erth Amboy 51 14 

I 'o what tan 4 14 

President Lincoln 41 14 

Quinault 6-5; 6-5 

K. C. Sladc 10 5 

Republic 50 14 

Rithet. R. P 2 5 

Roanoke 17 15 

-San Diego 46 15 

Santa Maria 28 14 

Seeadler (German Commerce Raider^ . 5 5 

.Standard 2 5 

St. Francis 6 7 

-St. Katherine 3 5 

Tuscania 23 6 

W. A. Bisso 29 14 

Winslow 22 5 

Y-Z 

Yukon, On the 19 11 

Zigzagging at Sea 29 11 



_, 5%1.6^- 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Officicil Papyer of the International Seamen's Union of Amenca. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXI, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1917. 



Whole No. 2451. 



"WAR WORK AND UNION STANDARDS." 



Was West's Criticism of Gompers "Unfounded and Unjust"? 



The Journal is in receipt of a five-page com- 
munication from Samuel Gompers, President of 
the American Federation of Labor, together 
with a six-page article on "War Work and 
Union Standards," written by Mr. Gompers for 
the Labor Day issue of the American Federa- 
tionist. The formal request has been made by 
Mr. Gompers that both be published and, al- 
though this will severely tax the space in this 
week's Journal, is complied with in keeping 
with the spirit of fairness and tolerance that 
has governed the policy of this paper since its 
inception, thirty years ago. 

By way of introduction to these noteworthy 
contributions it should be said that a limited 
number of copies (Issue of Journal, dated 
August 15) containing the criticism which 
aroused Mr. Gompers' ire, are still available 
and will be gladly furnished, upon request, to 
those of our readers who have recently arrived 
in port. For further comment upon this subject 
see editorial pages in this issue. 

Mr. Gompers' letter follows, in full: 

Washington, D. C, August 24, 1917. 
Mr. Paul Scharrenberg, Editor 

Coast Seamen's Journal. 
Dear Sir and Brother: 

I read with the deepest interest your intro- 
duction to the article of Mr. George P. West 
as published by him originally in a magazine, 
and then republished in several of the Socialist 
political party papers, and now I find it in the 
one of which you arc editor, The Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

For those who know Mr. West's peculiar 
twist of mind, nothing can be expected than 
antagonism to the true trade-union movement 
of America, and unfounded and unjust criticism 
of those who stand sponsor for our move- 
ment. With the least possible foundation upon 
which to base Mr. West's attack and criticism, 
he proceeds to deliberately state that which is 
untrue. 

In the September issue of the American 
Federationist I am publishing an article under 
the caption "War Work and Union Standards" 
and enclosed herein I am sending you page 
proofs of that article. You will note therein 
the agreement reached between the Depart- 
ment of War and me,* and also the extension 
of the terms of that agreement to land con- 
struction in the Navy Department, wherein 
union hours and union standards and conditions 
of labor are the guiding policies of the Govern- 
ment and which have been secured by reason 
of the activities of the representatives of the 
American trade unions. 



• Details of this arrangement liave already been 
published in the .Tournal. See "Washington Let- 
ter," page 8, issue of September 5. 



It may be interesting for you to know that 
the agreement with the Secretary of War has 
been extended to the Aviation Construction 
fields. It may be also interesting to say that 
in broader and fuller terms an agreement of 
similar character has been entered into between 
the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Franklin 
D. Roosevelt; Edmund A. Hurley, Chairman 
of the Shipping Board; Admiral Capps, U. S. 
Navy, Director of the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration; James O'Connell, President of the 
Metal Trades Department, A. F. of L.; Wm. 
H. Johnson, President of the International As- 
sociation of Machinists; A. J. Berres, Secretary 
of the Metal Trades Department, A. F. of L. ; 
Jos. F. Valentine, P/esident of the Molders' 
International Union of America; T. M. Guerin, 
Eexcutive Board Member, United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners; John H. Donlin, 
President of the Building Trades Department, 

A. F. of L.; Frank J. McNulty, President of 
the Electrical Workers' International Brother- 
hood; John R. Alpine, President of the Plumb- 
ers and Steam Fitters' United Association; Mil- 
ton J. Snellings, President of the International 
Union of Steam Engineers; J. A. Franklin, 
President of the Brotherhood of Boilermakers 
and Iron Ship Builders; James Wilson, Presi- 
dent of the Pattern Makers; Samuel Gompers, 
President of the American Federation of Labor; 
- — applying to the construction and repairs on 
ships. 

In the same issue of the Coast Seamen's 
Journal in which you published your intro- 
duction to and Mr. West's article entire, you say 
editorially: 

"The conference of shipowners and seamen 
held recently at Washington, D. C, at the re- 
quest of Messrs. Wm. C. Redfield and William 

B. Wilson, has brought eminently satisfactory 
results from several points of view. 

"To begin with, the conference clearly demon- 
strated to all who cared to know that the 
licensed men and the men before the mast 
were standing shoulder to shoulder. 

"Next, it was made quite plain that co- 
operation instead of antagonism must be the 
the watchword between shipowners and sea- 
men during the war. The absence of the Steel 
Trust's representatives from the conference 
rather emphasized the point. That arrogant, 
labor-crushing organization, which has already 
made millions upon millions of dollars in war 
profits, will be dealt with in suitable fashion. 
During our country's most trying days, Mr. 
Gary, the head of the Steel Trust, must be and 
will be shown that he cannot ignore the Marine 
Unions and the Government too. 

"Aside from one discordant note raised by a 
Pacific Coast Shipowners' representative there 
was no suggestion for a modification or repeal 
of the Seamen's Act. To the contrary, there 
was a fairly unanimous expression of opinion 
that the law should remain as it is:' that a 
better enforcement rather than a modification 
would cure the alleged burdensome features 
about which complaints have been heard. 

"As a net result of the conference a com- 



mittee of fifteen has been chosen to bring 
about genuine co-operation in securing and 
training men for the great new American Mer- 
chant Marine. The committee is composed of 
six shipowners, six seamen (including licensed 
men) and one representative each from the 
Department of Commerce, the Department of 
Labor, and the United States Shipping Board." 

It is quite true that all existing wrongs have 
not been righted or all rights secured and I 
am as conscious of this fact as anyone can be 
and endeavoring with whatever influence the 
American Federation of Labor and I can exert 
to see that the rights and the welfare of the 
workers are protected and promoted. 

At the first meeting of the Committee on 
Labor of the Council of National Defense a 
declaration was recommended to the Council 
of National Defense, and which it adopted, as 
follows: 

Resolution Adopted at Meeting of Executive 
Committee on Labor. 

(As approved by Advisory Commission and 
Council of National Defense, April 6, 1917.) 

The defense and safety of the nation must be 
the first consideration of all patriotic citizens. 
To avoid confusion and facilitate the prepara- 
tion for national defense and give a stable basis 
upon which the representatives of the Govern- 
ment may operate during the war, we recom- 
mend: 

First — That the Council of National Defense 
should issue a statement to employers and 
employes in our industrial plants and trans- 
portation systems advising that neither em- 
ployers nor employes shall endeavor to take 
advantage of the country's necessity to change 
existing standards. When economic or other 
emergencies arise requiring changes of stand- 
ards, the same should be made only after such 
proposed changes have been investigated and 
approved by the Council of National Defense. 

Second — That the Council of National De- 
fense urge upon the legislatures of the States, 
as well as all administrative agencies charged 
with the enforcement of labor and health laws, 
the great duty of rigorously maintaining the 
existing safeguards as to the health and the 
welfare of workers, and that no departure f from 
such present standards in State laws or State 
rulings affecting labor, should be taken without 
a declaration of the Council of National De- 
fense that such a departure is essential for 
the effective pursuit of the national defense. 

Third — That the Council of National Defense 
urge upon the legislatures of the several States 
that before final adjournment they delegate to 
the Governors of their respective States the 
power to suspend or modify restrictions con- 
tained in their labor laws when such suspension 
or modification shall be re(|uested by the Coun- 
cil of National Defense; and such suspensions 
or modifications, when made shall continue for 

t According to Mr. Gompers "No departure from 
present standards" was Intended to mean "No lower- 
ing of present standards." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



a specified period and nf>t longer than the 
duration of the war. 

Amplification of Declaration Adopted by Execu- 
tive Committee, April 16, 1917. 

"There seems to be some misunderstanding of 
the scope of the statement made by the Coun- 
cil of National Defense when it advised that 
"neither employers nor employes shall endeavor 
to take advantage of the country's necessities 
to change existing standards." In order that 
that misunderstanding may be removed, the fol- 
lowing amplification is made: 

"There have been established by legislation, 
by mutual agreement between employers and 
employes, or by custom certain standards con- 
stituting a day's work. These vary from seven 
hours per day in some kinds of work to 
twelve hours per day in continuous operation 
plants. The varioue States and nuinicipalities 
have established specific standards of safety 
and sanitation and have provided inspection 
service to enforce the regulations. They have 
also established maximum hours of work for 
women and minimum age limits for children 
employed in gainful occupations. It is the 
judgment of the Council of National Defense 
that the Federal, State and Municipal Govern- 
ments should continue to enforce the standards 
they have established unless and until the 
Council of National Defense has determined 
that some modification or change of the stand- 
ards is essential to the national safety; that 
employers and employes in private industries 
should not attempt to take advantage of the 
existing abnormal conditions to change the 
standards which they were unable to change 
under normal conditions. 

"The one other standard that the Council had 
in mind was the standard of living. It recog- 
nizes that the standard of living is indefinite 
and difficult to determine, because it is in a 
measure dependent upon the purchasing power 
of wages. It believes, however, that no arbi- 
trary change in wages should be sought at this 
time by either employers or employes through 
the process of strikes or lockouts without at 
least giving the established agencies, including 
those of the several States and of the Govern- 
ment, and of the Mediation Board in the 
transportation service and the Division of 
Conciliation of the Department of Labor in 
the other industries, an opportunity to adjust the 
diflficulties without a stoppage of work occur- 
ring. While the Council of National Defense 
does not mean to intimate that under ordinary 
circumstances the efficiency of workers is the 
only element that should be taken into con- 
sideration in fixing the hours of labor, safety, 
sanitation, women's work and child labor 
standards, such efficiency is the object that must 
be attained during the period when the nation's 
safety is involved. It may, therefore, be neces- 
sary for the Council as a result of its in- 
vestigations and experience to suggest modifi- 
cations and changes in these standards during 
that time. It is not the purpose of the Coun- 
cil, however, to undertake to determine the 
wage rate that will be sufficient to maintain 
the existing standards of living. Such ques- 
tions as cannot be adjusted by private negotia- 
tions should be referred to the mediation agen- 
cies above referred to or to such other con- 
stituted agencies as may exist to the end that 
such questions may be adjusted in an orderly 
and equitable manner to avoid the stoppage of 
industries which are so vital to the interests 
of the nation at this critical time." 

The newspapers of the country carried a sen- 
sational misinterpretation of that declaration 
and every enemy of labor and those who were 
over-credulous believed in the sensational head- 
ings of the newspapers rather than the body of 
the declaration. 

It is by reason of the adoption of that 
declaration that legislatures have been stopped 
from passing laws to lower standards and sus- 
pend the operation of laws enacted in the in- 
terests and for the protection of the workers. 

Of course there can be no question that you, 
like every other union member, man or citizen, 
have the right to differ from any course which 
I may pursue, or make criticism as your judg- 
ment and conscience may direct, and yet I have 
an abiding faith that you would not care to 
consciously do the American Federation of 
Labor or me an unwarrantable injustice. 

An agreement has been entered into by the 
Shipping Board and the International Long- 
shoremen's Association providing for a board 
to deal with all questions of wages and hours. 
The Longshoremen are to have representation 
on that board. 

I feel sure that in respect to these matters 
of which I have written, you were unaware 
when you published Mr. West's article or when 
you penned the introduction thereto. 

Is it too much to ask that you publish this 
letter and the article from the American Fed- 
erationist of which I send you the page proofs? 
With best wishes, I am. 

Fraternally yours, 
(Signed) SAMUEL GOMPERS, 
President .American Federation of Labor. 

P. S. — The name of W. W. Britton, President 
of the Metal Polishers, Buffers, Platers, Brass 
and Silver Workers' Union of North America 
should be added to the names of the other 



officers of International LTnions who signed the 
agreement with the Shipping Board. S. G. 



The following article, written by Mr. Gompers, 
is printed in full as per his request: 

"WAR WORK AND UNION STANDARDS." 

'J he initial step in the material preparation 
necessary for training the army to be used by 
our nation in the war upon which it has 
entered was the construction of cantonments. 
No effort could be made in mobilizing new 
forces until there were provisions for housing 
the soldiers, providing for them living quarters 
that would enable them to keep physically fit. 

There are being buildcd by the War Depart- 
ment sixteen cantonments; each cantonment is 
practically a city in itself and must contain 
provisions for all of the physical and mental 
needs of the soldiers. The housing, the sani- 
taiy conditions, and recreation opportunities, 
must be of the very best, for the men must 
be in the best of condition. In addition, there 
must be buildings for social gatherings, libraries, 
and for all other activities necessary to main- 
tain a fighting morale. 

The gigantic task of completing these sixteen 
cantonments before September 1 devolved upon 
the War Department. Additional understanding 
of the size and the task comes from the fact 
that several of these cantonments will cost 
from three to five millions of dollars. In order 
to complete the work before the specified time 
the War Department began work on the can- 
tonments before legislation was passed appro- 
priating the necessary funds. In this emer- 
gency work contracts were not let to com- 
petitive bidding, but contractors willing to 
take contracts under the circumstances began 
work on the basis of a memorandum which 
allowed them cost, plus from 6 to 7 per cent. 

The cantonments, which are located at well 
considered places scattered throughout the Uni- 
ted States, have been the centers of tremendous 
and intensive activities. Almost incredible 
progress has been reported at many different 
points. 

For one cantonment tall trees, in which the 
birds were nesting, were cut and constructed 
into buildings within a week. Entire plumbing 
systems have been erected within a day. This 
is the work of loyal, intelligent American brawn 
and brain. 

But the construction companies began their 
work along the same lines and policies that 
have inevitably resulted in labor unrest and 
complaints. These companies, even some of 
those that had generally been fair, tried to 
take advantage of the fact they were ])erforming 
emergency work for the Government and to 
make that an excuse for disregarding wage- 
scales and standards of work that are necessary 
to protect the lives and health of the workers. 
Numerous violations of the eight-hour law 
were reported. The companies insisted that 
the men work overtime and many refused to 
pay the union scale or the time and one-half 
for overtime provided for by the Naval Appro- 
priation Act of March 4, 1917. 

Many companies advertised throughout the 
State in whicli they were operating for workers 
in all kinds of trades and thus an over-supply 
of men came to the place of construction. Some 
of these workers paid their own expenses to 
respond to the advertisements, and arrived at 
the place only to find no employment for 
them. Companies persisted in this adver- 
tising policy despite the fact that organizations 
of labor had put all of the employment agen- 
cies of their offices at the disposal of the 
Government. 

The situation at Fort Benjamin Harrison at 
Indianapolis was typical of the labor troubles 
on cantonment construction. The Gaylord En- 
gineering Company, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, 
secured that contract. The officers of the 
Brotherhood of Carpenters, whose headquarters 
are in Indianapolis, oflFered to furnish all of 
the carpenters needed in order thus to avoid a 
bringing in of an over-supply which would 
work a hardship to the unnecessary men 
brought in as well as result in lowering the 
existing scale for the workers of Indianapolis. 
Due to the effects of the war upon the build- 
ing industry many building tradesmen, including 
carpenters, plumbers, and electrical workers, 
were walking the streets of Indianapolis look- 
ing for work. Despite this condition the Cham- 
ber of Commerce joined with the Gaylord 
Engineering Company in the advertising cam- 
paign which flooded Indianapolis with large 
numbers of workers from afar. Immediately 
protests from the men of Indianapolis out 
of employment, from those who had been 
victimized by misleading advertisements, and 
from the officers of labor organizations, 
were sent to the headquarters of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor and to the War 
Department. The American Federation of 
Labor took the matters up with representatives 
of the War Department and efforts were made 
to protect the workers and to have the Gay- 
lord Engineering Company observe fair stand- 
ards. However, the Government had no es- 
tablished agencies for dealing with such a situ- 
ation. The carpenters struck the work at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison in order to enforce their 
demands for justice. The strike lasted two 
days. This was one of the convincing argu- 



ments tliat made it plain that some extra- 
ordinary governmental agency must be es- 
tablished to ensure justice for workers engaged 
in cantonment construction and thereby to 
avoid interruption of the work which must be 
completed at an early date. 

Several conferences were held at the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor offices at which were 
present the principals of the Gaylord Con- 
struction Company, a representative of the 
War Department and President Gompers and 
the immediate cause of the labor dispute at the 
Fort Benjamin Harrison cantonment adjusted. 
The War Department endeavored in every 
possible way to be fair to contractors and to 
protect them against losses through canton- 
ment construction. The Department realized 
that equal in importance with fairness to con- 
tractors was justice and fair treatment of 
workers. If the construction work on canton- 
ments was to progress with the fewest number 
of impediments it was necessary for workers to 
feel assured that their rights would be protected 
and that they had means of redress. 

A brief memorandum between Honorable 
Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War, and Presi- 
dent Gompers, of the American Federation of 
Labor, marks the initial recognition by the 
Government of the United States of the or- 
ganized labor movement as the indispensable 
agency for dealing with workers. The memo- 
randum recognizes the organized labor move- 
ment as representative of the desires and the 
needs of wage-earners, the articulate expression 
of standards of life and work, as well as of 
ideals. The memorandum, which was signed on 
June 19, 1917, is as follows: 

"Washington, D. C, June 19. 1917. 
"For the adjustment and control of wages, 
hours and conditions of labor in the construc- 
tion of cantonments, there shall be created 
an adjusment commission of three persons, ap- 
pointed by the Secretary of War; one to rep- 
resent the Army, one the public, and one 
Labor; the last to be nominated by Samuel 
Gompers, member of the Advisory Commission 
of the Council of National Defense, and Presi- 
dent of the American Federation of Labor. 

"As basic standards with reference to each 
cantonment, such commission shall use the 
union scale of wages, hours and conditions in 
force June 1, 1917, in the locality where such 
cantonment is situated. Consideration shall be 
given to special circumstances, if any, arising 
after said date which may require particular 
advances in wages or changes in other stand- 
ards. Adjustment of wages, hours or condi- 
tions, made by such boards are to be treated as 
binding by all parties. 

"NEWTON D. BAKER, 
"SAMUEL GOMPERS." 
In pursuance of this memorandum, General 
E. A. Garlington was appointed to represent 
the Arn)y, Mr. Walter Lippman, to represent 
the public, and Mr. John R. Alpine, Vice- 
President of the .American Federation of Labor, 
and President of the United Association of 
Plumbers and Steamfitters, to represent or- 
ganized labor. The following procedure under 
the memorandum was agreed to: 

"1. The Cantonment Adjustment Commission 
will sit at Washington, D. C, unless specially 
ordered by the Secretary of War to go to the 
site of a construction. 

"2. It will obtain full information of union 
scales of wages, hours, and conditions in force 
on June 1, 1917, in the several localities where 
cantonments are to be constructed, for such 
labor as is being or will be employed on such 
work. For this information the commission 
will rely upon data furnished so far as may 
be practicable by the Department of Labor. 

"3. The cantonments will be conveniently 
distributed and the Secretary of War will, for 
the period of the construction and with the 
unanimous approval of the commission, appoint 
for each district a responsible impartial exami- 
ner who shall act under the orders of the com- 
mission. 

"4. If a dispute arises which cannot be ad- 
justed satisfactorily by the contracting officer at 
the site and the employes involved, the contract- 
ing officer shall issue a provisional order which 
may be affirmed, reversed or modified by the 
adjustment commission. 

"S. In cases where the provisional order of 
the contracting officer is not accepted, the ac- 
tual work of construction shall not be inter- 
rupted, but the contracting officer shall notify 
the member of the commission representing the 
army of the matter in dispute, the proposals 
made by each party for adjustment, and of the 
provisional order which he has issued. At the. 
same time the member of the commission, des- 
ignated by Mr. Gompers, shall obtain from a 
reliable source a report on the matter in dispute. 
"6. If the commission is notified that a dis- 
pute is not adjusted satisfactorily at the site, 
or if it learns from other sources that a dispute 
is in such condition, it will as speedily as pos- 
sible send an examiner to the site. 

"7. The examiner shall have authority, act- 
ing under the orders of the commission, to 
mediate between the parties. If he fails in this 
he shall report promptly and fully to the com- 
mission with a recommendation. The examiner 
shall, if ordered by the commission or by any 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Pension Rejected for Compensation Plan. 

At a public hearing before the House 
committee on Foreign and Interstate Com- 
merce, life insurance representatives and 
politicians led the opposition to the bill 
providing for family allowances, compen- 
sation, education and insurance of Amer- 
ica's soldiers and sailors. 

Under this legislation all former pen- 
sion plans are rejected and the principle 
of workmen's compensation, with its fixed 
sums, replaces the old plan of a pittance 
doled out to the soldier by legislative en- 
actment after suffering by himself and 
family. 

Politicians oppose the plan on the 
ground that it will destroy the country's 
present soldiers' pension system, which 
has been used on more than one occasion 
for vote-getting purposes. 

Private insurance companies oppose the 
plan on the ground that the government 
is "interfering with their business." Some 
friends of the legislation suggest that the 
fact that soldiers can be insured for $8 
per $1000 up to $10,000 might assist the 
companies in forming a judgment. 

The bill was prepared by a committee, 
appointed by Samuel Gompers, chairman 
of the committee on labor, council of na- 
tional defense. Hon. Julian W. Mack, 
federal circuit judge, Illinois district, was 
made chairman of this sub-committee, 
which called to its assistance the finest 
brains the government could secure and 
which will result in the government em- 
barking in an unheard of insurance busi- 
ness. 

Under present laws a private in the Uni- 
ted States army gets $33 a month for 
service abroad. If he has a wife and two 
children he must allot to them at least $15 
a month. The Government supplements 
this under the proposed law by giving 
the family an allowance of $32.50, which 
makes its income $47.50 a month. The 
father can allot as much more as he 
pleases. If there is another child the 
Government will allow $5 additional. If 
the man has a dependent father or mother, 
or more children, the Government makes 
additional allowances up to $50 a month 
over and above the man's own allotment. 
If total disability results, a private's de- 
pendents are awarded from $40 to $75 a 
month, according to the size of the family. 
Partial disabilities are also compensated, 
with medical, surgical and hospital treat- 
ment, supplies and appliances given with- 
out cost. 

Provision is made for the soldier to in- 
sure his life in amounts from $1,000 to 
$10,000 at a cost of $8 per $1,000, the Gov- 
ernment to bear all expenses of adminis- 
tration. After the war this insurance may 
be converted into other forms with earlier 
maturity without extra cost. For those 
who are totally disabled or die before they 
have had an opportunity to insure within 
the prescribed period of 120 days, insur- 
ance in the sum of $5,000 is deemed to 
have been applied for and granted. 

The bill includes the re-education of in- 
jured men for a life of activity and use- 



fulness either in their former or some other 
vocation. 

It is estimated that the first year's cost 
for this plan will be $176,150,000 and the 
second year's cost, $380,500,000. In de- 
fending the plan against the charge that 
the cost is excessive. Secretary of the 
Treasury McAdoo says, in a statement to 
the President: 

"At this time we are contemplating ex- 
penditures during the fiscal year 1918 of 
more than $10,000,000,000 for the prosecu- 
tion of the war — for the creation of armies 
and death-dealing instruments to be used 
in destroying enough human life to restore 
peace and justice in the world. Shall we 
hesitate to expend $700,000,000 more per 
annum, if need be — only about 6 per cent, 
of the amount we propose to expend for 
purposes of war — for the protection of the 
widows and orphans, the dependent and 
the injured, who, after all, make the great- 
est sacrifices of any part of our people, 
for the safety, security, and honor of our 
country? 

"Furthermore, it must be borne in mind 
that the Government will not escape those 
expenditures if this plan of compensation 
and insurance should be rejected, because 
the pension system would then be resorted 
to, and the cost would likely exceed that 
of the proposed plan. 

"We are drafting men and compelling 
them to make, if necessary, the supreme 
sacrifice for their country," continues Sec- 
retary McAdoo. "A higher obligation 
therefore rests upon the Government to 
mitigate the horrors of war for the fight- 
ing men and their dependents in so far as 
it is possible to do so through compen- 
sations, indemnities, and insurance. Less 
than this, a just, generous, and humane 
government can not do. We must set an 
example to the world, not alone in the 
ideals for which we fight, but in the treat- 
ment we accord to those who fight and 
sacrifice for us." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Neylan Scores Pawnbroker Patriots. 

In a speech before one of the trade 
divisions of the Chamber of Commerce, 
John Francis Neylan, associated with 
Herbert C. Hoover in the national food 
administration, declared that "pawn- 
broker patriots" are coining millions from 
the needs and miseries of the nation. 

The speaker predicted that within six 
months the entire life of the United States 
will undergo a change and that "that 
change is going to be more radical than 
anything in our history." 

"The essential change," he said, "is go- 
ing to come in our industrial life, and all 
other rearrangements are going to depend 
upon the degree of foresight, understand- 
ing and justice with which this change is 
made. Every other nation involved in 
this war has faced the same problem. 

"The time has passed when workmen 
can be driven to a task at the point of 
a bayonet. Civilization has advanced and 
the worker has established liis right to a 
voice in the shaping of the policies of in- 
dustry and of the nation. 

(Continued on Pag^e 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansverceniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 3SS Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




President Konenkainp of the Coin- 
tnercial Telegraphers' Union reports 
that the Canadian Press, a news 
gathering agency, has signed a un- 
ion-shop agreement, which includes 
its coast-to-coast jurisdiction. The 
new schedule establishes the highest 
average wage paid by any press as- 
sociation in North America. The 
Canadian Press will inaugurate its 
service next month, and is the result 
of an amalgamation of several press 
associations. Officers of the new 
company said they did not care to 
start business on any other than a 
union basis because of past experi- 
ences, and they recognized that the 
Commercial Telegraphers' Union is 
here to stay. 

The plea of the British Employers' 
Parliamentary Association that it "is 
not out to fight labor" is not wholly 
acceptable by the Manchester Cotton 
Factory Times, which warns labor 
that, while the employers may not 
attempt an aggressive opposition, "it 
would be a mistake to assume that 
its existence is not one of many 
warnings to labor organizations to 
tune themselves up to concert pitcli." 
The employers have not organized 
for fun or philanthropy, but have 
been found to further the employ- 
ers' interests, says this paper, which 
concludes: "After the war labor will 
get what it got before the war 
and always will get, namely, what 
it has power to take." 

The report for 1916 by the Swiss 
federation of co-operative consum- 
ers' societies has just been received. 
The report shows that during the 
year under review 12 affiliated so- 
cieties have severed their relations 
with the federation, while 26 socie- 
ties were admitted as new members. 
At the close of the year 421 societies 
were affiliated with the federation, as 
against 407 in 1915. The total sales 
for 1916 of the societies affiliated 
with the federation amounted to 74,- 
6.S8,943 francs ($14,409,176), as against 
.=50,193.162 francs ($9,687,280) for 1915. 
The increase of nearly 25,000,000 
francs ($4,700,000) in the total 
amount of sales is, however, not due 
to the sale of greater quantities of 
goods, but to the enormous increase 
in prices, which for 45 articles regu- 
larly sold by the societies amounts, 
on an average, to 70.5 per cent. 

A pamphlet has just been pub- 
lished by the British Amalgamated 
Society of Engineers in answer to 
the question, addressed to the trade- 
union representatives by the Engi- 
neering Employers' Federation, 
"What security can be offered to 
employers that reduction of hours 
will not result in a reduction of out- 
put?" Statistics in regard to the in- 
creased output that followed the in- 
troduction, by legislation, of the 10- 
hour day, are well known to students 
of industrial history, but figures in 
reference to output under an 8-hour 
day are not published and are not 
available to the ordinary student. 
The author therefore cites several 
cases of the operation of the 8-hour 
system, with unvarying testimony as 
to its profitableness. The foreword, 
contributed by the general secretary 
of the Federation of Engineering and 
Shipbuilding Trades, credits Mr. 
Brownlie's arguments with being "a 
clear and succinct statement of the 
case for an 8-hour day, and furnish- 
ing, perhaps, the first practical and 
scientific statement ever issued in 
furtherance of this movement for a 
substantial reduction of hours with- 
out loss of wages." 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BROWN &i SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 
And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 
109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



San Pedro Letter List. 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

122 Sixth Street, San Pedro 

PROPRIETORS OF 

STANDARD BOTTLING WORKS 

Manufacturers and Bottlers of All Flavors Union Bottler 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 
531 Front Street 
Two Entrance! 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 
STATIONERY 

Loa Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Bteam Laundry 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The following named members, 
who were on board the steamer 
"Northwestern" in 1911, when a mail 
pouch was lost, are requested to 
communicate with the Alaska Steam- 
ship Co., Seattle, Wash.: T. Mitch- 
ell, B. S.; J. Morrissey, A. B.; R. 
Rulander, A. B.; T. Armstrong, A. B.; 
W. Nelson, A. B.; E. Newland, 
A. B.; G. H. McNeiley, A. B.; E. H. 
Thume, A. B.; I. Foulkes, A. B.; 
R. Prescott, A. B.; N. Mathinson, 
A. B. 1-24-17 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE— S. G. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and have no solicitors 
out. 
Clothes IVIade Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



Nils August Martinsson, a native 
of Helsingborg, Sweden, age 41, is 
inquired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Emanuel Hanson, P. O. Box 65, 
Seattle, Wash. 5-2-17 



H. Fredblad, who was a member 
of the crew of the schooner "Geo. E. 
Billings" in October, last year, is 
inquired for. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Geo. E. 
Billings, 312 California St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 4-18-17 



The members of the crew of the 
Danish steamer "Danebod" are en- 
titled to salvage for services ren- 
dered to schooner "Myrtle Leaf," 
January 18, 1917. Claims should be 
filed with Attorney S. B. Axtell, 1 
Broadway, New York. 2-28-17 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edwin E. Chisholm, who was last 
heard from when sailing on the 
Great Lakes, is inquired for by his 
brother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts will please notify J. H. Chis- 
holm, 132 Proctor St., Port Arthur, 
Texas. 8-22-17. 

G. Sniorenberg, a cook, last heard 
from in September, 1916, in New 
Orleans, La., is inquired for. He is a 
native of Holland, about five feet 
seven inches tall. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify H. 
Buytendorp, 451 G street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 8-29-17 

Nick Nirisen, a native of Norway, 
last heard of in San Pedro about 3 
years ago, is inquired for by his 
wife, Kristina Nirisen, Brevig, Nor- 
way. 

Any information regarding the 
whereabouts of August Lindeman, 
No. 1314, who disappeared from the 
stcanischooner "National City," May 
18, 1917, will be appreciated by Mrs. 
A. Lindeman, 1014 Pardee St., West 
Berkeley, Cal. 6-13-17. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Peter Murphy, better known as 
Boatswain McGann, will kindly notify 
Patrick Kieran, 58 Commercial St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 4-19-16 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Tlie Anglo -GaliMa Trust Goinpany 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 

offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS.. $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 16,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



Anderson, Otto 
Adler. H. 

Andree, E. A. -1410 
Abrahamson. A. 
Anderson. Oskar 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andersen, Frank 

-332 
Alexandersen. Paul 
Bergesen, Sivert 
Brown, G. 
Bertelsen, Bertel 
Billington. Martin 
Bulander, B. 
Brien, Hans 
Hentsen, Hans B. 
Cliristensen, A. 
Carl.son, R. C. 
C'.irlson, Gustaf 
Cliristensen, E. 
Dahlstrom, Ernest 
Dougal. A. 
DrcRer. Jack 
Dalberg, O. 
Kklund, Swen 
Emkow, Otto 
Em ton, Isaac 
Folvig, John 
Frilierg, Peter 
Fosberg. Leonard 
Folvis. Ludvig 
(IriKoilt. Erd 
Gerhardt. John 
Gundersen, K. 
Gunnerud. Thorvald 
Gerard. Albert 
Gunwald, John 
Gusek, Ben 
Heeshe, Henry 
Hoek, A. 
Hunter, Ernest 
Hoglund, J. A. 
Helinius. Elnar 
Hagser, F. W. 
Hdhnan, Max 
Hedman, John M. 
Jakson, John H. 
Johanson, N. A. 
Johnson, John A. 
Johnson, Gunnar 
Johansen, Fred 
Jansson. Bernhard 
Karre, M. V. 
Kron. H. 
Kriiger, Gustaf 
Kallas, M. 
Kristensen, Niels 
Kallio. Franz 
Kind. H. 
Lorentzen, Karl 
Ijundquist, Ralph 
Lund. J. W. M. 
LIvendahl, Gus 
Leideker. E. 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Labrentz, Max 



L.Takso. F. E. -1411 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Letchford. A. 
Mokevv, W. 
MaKnussen, Sigurd 
Morris. Oscar 
Mlchaelsen, MattI 
Marion, J. 
Malmberg. Ellis 
Martensson, A. 
Mamers, Carl 
Miller, R. E. 
Metz, John 
Minners. Herman 
Moberg. Karl G. 
Nelson. Oscar 
Neskanin, Gus 
Nicolaisen. Hans 
Olsen. Tollef 
Olsson, O. S. 
Olsen, Ole W. 
Pera, Gustl 
Petersen, Olaf 
Peterson, K. E. 

-903 
Paul, Peter G. 
Petersen, C. -1493 
Paulsen, James 
Pederson, John 
Peterson, Alfred 
Pedersen. Alf. -1323 
Palmquist, A. 
Peterson, Hugo 
Petterson, C. V. 
Petersen, N. -1234 
Petersen. John -1136 
Raaum, Harry 
Rivera. John 
Rahlph, Th 
Retal. Otto 
Raun, Einar 
Swanson, James 
Sanders, Chas. 
Selewskl, Franz 
Schulze, Max 
Schroeder, Alfred 
Stensland. Paul 
Strahle, Chas. 
Selander, W. 
Thlrup. C. 
Tahtinen. HJ 
Tamml, E. 
Thompson, Maurice 
Thaysen, Arthur 
'I'horen. G. A. 
Thompson, Alex 
Wichman, C. 
Warkala, Jolin 
Warkkala, John 
Ysberg, Adolf 

Packages. 
Bluker, John 
Kruger, Wm. 
Rasmussen, Svend 
Novak, Andy 
Kramer, George 



NOTICE. 



Seamen, firemen or oilers who 
sailed on or were aboard of the SS. 
"Orleanian," "Frederick," "Maryland" 
or the tugboat "C. W. Morse," short- 
ly before they sailed on the voyages 
on which they were lost, will confer 
a great favor upon the relatives of 
deceased seamen who were lost with 
said respective vessels if they will 
communicate with the undersigned 
attorney for the said relatives. 

In each of these cases, it is be- 
lieved the vessel was unseaworthy 
before she left her sailing port and 
the owners are liable to the relatives 
of deceased seamen for damages 
sustained. 

One Jens G. Olsen of 51 South 
Street, New York City, is especially 
requested to call. The undersigned 
is representing Mrs. Dorothy H. 
Brown, widow of Charles R. Brown, 
deceased, assistant engineer on the 
SS. "Frderick"; Mrs. James J. Rob- 
bins, widow of the master of the 
"Frederick," and J. Filguiera, relative 
of J. and H. Filguiera, firemen on 
the SS. "Frederick." 

In the case of the SS. "Orleanian," 
the undersigned is representing the 
wives and children of Ingomar Win- 
ters, a steward; Peter Taile, a sea- 
man, and Diego Sceone, a fireman. 

In the case of the tug "C. W. 
Morse," the undersigned is represent- 
ing the relatives of Vincent Mos- 
quera Lopez, Valentin and Thomas 
Fontela, and the widow of William 
C. Fincke." 

S. B. AXTELL, 
Attorney-at-Law, 
1 Broadway, New York. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



T. Miller, Fritz Ruf, M. Griebert 
and W. Wagner, formerly of the 
S. S. "Ardmore," are wanted at once 
in the matter of salvage claims 
against the S. S. "Ardmore" by mem- 
bers of the crew of the S.S. "Prince- 
ton." Kindly communicate at once 
with S. B. Axtt.l, 1 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. 4-11-17 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



A speeding-up schedule is in progress on 
four large steamers being constructed at the 
yards of the Northwest Steel Company at Port- 
land, and prospects are that they will be com- 
pleted ahead of time. 

The Alaska Packers' Association has char- 
tered to G. W. McNear & Co. the ship "Star 
of Lapland." Last year in the off season for 
the salmon packets the Association chartered 
out the "Star of Holland" and others for off- 
shore voyages. The "Star of Lapland" will 
begin loading for Manila on arrival here. 

The schooner "Janies H. Bruce," one of the 
best-known sailing vessels of the Pacific Coast, 
has arrived at Newcastle, Australia, after a 
seventy-seven-day voyage from South Bend, 
Wash., according to a cablegram to the marine 
department of the Chamber of Commerce. The 
"Bruce" has averaged seventy-six days on her 
last four voyages from Pacific Coast ports to 
Australia. 

The first applications for American licenses, 
made under President Wilson's recent decision 
giving ships' officers and engineers of neutral 
countries permission to take out American papers 
during the war, was received by the United 
States steamboat inspectors at San Francisco 
during the week. They were made by four 
engineers of the Dutch steamer "Ombilin," now 
in port, who claim that they want to work in 
the war zone. 

The steam schooner "Fred Baxter" for the 
J. H. Baxter Company of San Francisco was 
launched at the Kruse & Banks shipyard at 
North Bend, Ore., on September 3. The launch- 
ing was thoroughly successful and the craft will 
be finished and towed to San Francisco for 
having her machinery installed, in about two 
or three weeks. The ways occupied by this 
ship are to be used for construction of a 
Government vessel of the Hough type. 

Advances in lumber rates on future ship- 
ments from the Columbia River, in some cases 
involving nearly 50 per cent, increase, are 
shown in the latest freight rates and charters 
made public at Portland. A majority of the 
charters were J. J. Moore & Co. for the ship- 
ment of lumber to Australian ports in the 
next twelve months. The big demand for 
lumber in Australia and the scarcity of ships 
are ascribed as causes for the increased rates. 

Making a fast run from Alaska of seventeen 
days, the ship "Indiana," the first of the re- 
turning salmon packers, arrived in San Fran- 
cisco on September 2 from Nushagak, with 41,- 
946 cases of salmon. The "Indiana" is owned 
by the Alaska Packers' Association, and car- 
ried thirty-three men. While the season's catch 
will be near normal, the returning packer re- 
ported that weather conditions alone prevented 
the breaking of all previous records. The fish, 
according to reports, were more plentiful than 
they have been for years, but heavy winds all 
summer interfered with the catch. 

The ships "Golden Gate," Captain Burgess, 
and "Annie M. Rcid," Captain Durkee, will 
start immediately for San Francisco on arriving 
at Tacoma from ofif shore ports to begin load- 
ing for Australia. The Union Steamship Com- 
pany took over the two big sailing vessels 
from Hind, Rolph & Co. on account of the 
scarcity of steamships. The company has lost 
three steamships in the last year through dis- 
asters at sea and a number of others were 
commandeered by the British Admiralty. The 
"Golden Gate" is on the way from Honolulu to 
Tacoma and the "Annie M. Reid" from Calcta 
Buena to Tacoma. 

The motor-ship "Selandia," Captain Tillisch, 
flying the Danish flag, sailed from San Fran- 
cisco on September 7 for the Orient on per- 
mission for the clearance of the vessel being 
telegraphed from Washington. The "Selandia," 
the Dutch steamship "Rembrandt" and the 
Toyo Kisen Kaisha's "Siberia Maru" were held 
in port by Collector of Customs John O. Davis 
on account of not having all the export licenses 
provided for in the embargo proclamation of 
the President. Permission for the "Siberia 
Maru" to sail was obtained over the telephone 
from Washington and she went out five hours 
after schedule sailing time. The "Rembrandt" 
left port on September 6. 

The cattle ship "Caribbean," operated by the 
Panama Canal Commissary Division for bringing 
live stock from Colombian and Central Ameri- 
can ports for the Canal Zone, is being renovated 
and overhauled in the 1000-foot dry dock at 
Balboa. The officers' quarters and the galley 
are being raised to the upper deck, on the level 
with {he master's quarters, and the accommoda- 
tions for live stock are being extended over the 
spaces made available by these changes. Hog 
and chicken pens are being constructed, and the 
capacity of the ship for cattle will be increased 
by 150 head. The ship will be able hereafter 
to carry 600 head of cattle, 2000 chickens, and 
100 young hogs. 

While more than a score of sailing vessels 
owned on the Pacific Coast are making long 
voyages in various parts of the world, the good 
lurk of the schooner "Snow & Burgess" has not 
deserted her, as became known during the 



week, when the owner, Andy Mahony, received 
a cablegram that the five-master had reached 
Durban, South Africa, from Victoria, B. C. 
The "Snow & Burgess" made a fast voyage — 
one of the fastest in recent months among the 
sailing craft — only being 107 days on the long 
trip. She sailed about 10,000 miles, rounding 
both Cape Horn and Cape of Good Hope. The 
"Snow & Burgess" will carry a coal cargo 
to Manila from Durban and come to San 
Francisco with a load of copra from Manila. 

Wreckers are preparing to make an attempt 
to recover the boilers from the wrecked steam- 
ship "Bear" at Blunt's Reef. Whether or not 
the attempt will be successful is a matter of 
speculation in shipping circles. The recovery of 
the boilers is worth while at this time, as all 
machinery for steamships is at the highest mark 
in history. Practically everything movable 
has been taken from the "Bear," with the boilers 
and engines still in the vessel. The work of 
removal has been going on almost steadily since 
the sale of the wreck by the San Francisco- 
Portland Steamship Company to the wrecking 
company. The two boilers weigh forty-two 
tons each and their recovery will be the hard- 
est task the owners have set for themselves. 

Sustaining the decision of Local Inspectors 
of Boilers and Hulls James Guthrie and Joseph 
Dolan, United States Steamship Inspector James 
Bulger yesterday refused the appeal made by 
Captain William Richtcr of the ferryboat "Mel- 
rose" for commutation of his si-x months' sus- 
pension for negligence in connection with the 
loss of two members of his crew on July 8 
last. The crew members were drowned while 
trying to save a man who had jumped over- 
board. At the same time. Inspector Bulger 
reduced the suspension of Captain Carl F. A. 
Henningsen of the steamer "Orcas," from one 
year to six months. Captain Henningsen was 
found guilty, on March 21, of navigating his 
vessel as a steamer without a certificate of in- 
spection. 

The "Santa Elena," the first sheltered deck 
motor-ship to be built on the Pacific Coast, 
averaged nine knots on her trial over the San 
Francisco bay course on September 3. This 
vessel is one of a fleet of four being built by 
W. R. Grace & Co. The sister ships are the 
"Santa Isabel," the "Santa Christena" and the 
"Santa Flavia." The sheltered deck type of mo- 
tor-ship is a departure from the lumber schooner 
class, as they are fitted to carry general cargo. 
With the exception of length, the "Santa Elena" 
is iniilt along lines laid down by the United States 
Shipping Board for standard wooden vessels. 
The "Santa Elena" is 225 feet long, with a 
43-foot beam. She is equipped with two 320- 
horse-power Bolinder engines and twin screws 
and has a 2000-ton cargo capacity. She carries 
fuel for sixty-four days at full speed and saves 
more than 30 per cent, of cargo space over 
steamer types. Burning twenty-five barrels of 
fuel a day, she only consumes one-seventh the 
fuel that a steam vessel of the same size would 
use. The new vessel was built. at Gray's Har- 
bor and her engines, which were made in 
Sweden, were installed- at the Union Iron 
Works. The "Santa Christena" and "Santa 
Isabel" are in port waiting for engines and the 
"Santa Flavia" is expected within thirty days. 

Spurred on by the war prices of scrap iron 
and steel. Captain T. P. H. Whitelaw has of- 
fered to go into a partnership with the Govern- 
ment in a hunt for sunken treasure along the 
coast of California. In his offer, made through 
H. W. Rhodes, lighthouse inspector of the 
Eighteenth district, the old wrecker agrees to 
attempt the recovery of lost buoy moorings, to 
stand all the expense of the undertaking and 
to take payment on a percentage basis. The 
buoy moorings consist of a half ton of cast 
iron, to which is attached an average of fifty 
fathoms of two-and-one-half-inch steel chain. 
In addition to the value of the cast iron, the 
steel chain, at present prices, is worth about 
$25 a fathom and is difficult to buy at any 
price. More than fifty buoy moorings, accord- 
ing to Inspector Rhodes, have been lost in 
recent years. As these moorings in ordinary 
times were not considered worth recovering, no 
records have been kept of their location. This 
adds to the uncertainty of the undertaking, in- 
asmuch as their positions are only a matter of 
conjecture. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sut- 
ter 5807. (Advt.) 

"Silas B. Axtell (attorney for Seamen's Unions 
in New York), formerly attorney for The Legal 
Aid Society, announces that he has opened an 
office for the practice of law and for the ex- 
clusive use of seamen. Consultation and advice 
free of charge. Suits under the La Follette Act 
for half wages; actions for damages for injuries 
on account of accident, etc., given prompt atten- 
tion." (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

tmd 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 
FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters; 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JOHN BERG, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHRODER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON. Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY 12 South Street 

Telephone 2107 Broad 

New York Branch 514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass 6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La 228 Lafayette Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 806 South Broadway 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 206 Moravian Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 231 Dock Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 220 Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass 168 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 54 Commercial Place 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wlckenden Street 

NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 

Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 47 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, Mich 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

rONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 9214 Harbor Avenue 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 1 Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communic.Ttlons from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. Tlie .JOUIJN.^L is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1917. 



CRITICISM OF MR. GOMPERS. 



The President of the American Federation 
of Labor is displeased, to put it mildly, be- 
cause the JouRN.\L published some criticism 
of himself, written by Mr. George P. West, 
a publicist who has ever been in whole- 
hearted sympathy with the aims and aspira- 
tions of the organized wage-workers. 

Mr. Gompers, by way of introduction to 
his reply (see page 1, this issue) alleges that 
Mr. West has a "peculiar twist of mind." 
Moreover, Mr. Gompers intimates in polite 
but clear language that Mr. West is a de- 
liberate falsifier! 

Then, in the body of his letter and in his 
article under the caption, "War Work and 
Union Standards," Mr. Gompers proceeds 
to explain that in some trades, at least, union 
recognition on war contracts has actually 
been won. Finally, he rather modifies his 
somewhat harsh introductory remarks by 
conceding every "union member, man or 
citizen," the right to differ with him and 
to criticize him, etc. It is gratifying to have 
this assurance under the signature of Mr. 
Gompers because, judging by the drift of 
current events, the right to criticize the 
powers that be is decidedly conditional. It 
has, in fact, been made subject to the whim 
and pleasure of a few pinhead autocrats. 

Of course, Mr. Gompers has rendered 
splendid service to the American labor move- 
ment, lie has spent a lifetime in furthering 
the cause of industrial justice as the basis 
for a true and enduring democracy. But 
^Ir. Gompers is only human. Since our 
country has entered the world war because 
of the ruthless tactics of the German ruling 
class, honor upon honor, mixed with grave 
and tremendous responsibility, has been vir- 
tually thrust upon the President of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. To-day there is 
a serious doubt whether any citizen of this 
Republic, except perhaps President Wilson, 
wields greater influence and power in sha- 



ping the Nation's destiny than Samuel Gom- 
pers. 

Has he exercised it wisely and yet cour- 
ageously? 

Has he been steadfast to the course mapped 
out by his constituents the workers, or has 
he yielded to the fawning of the plutocratic 
press that has so suddenly changed its curses 
to praises? 

Conceding his mental ability to cope with 
any task imposed upon him, is he physically 
qualified to stand up and fight the workers' 
battles at the time and the occasion when 
they must be fought to bring results? 

Has he experienced any over-night doubts 
about the ability of the American labor move- 
ment to speak for itself in all matters; or if 
not, why this curious partnership between 
himself and his erstwhile bitter enemies, the 
parlor socialists? 

Other more or less pertinent questions may 
be propounded, not in the spirit of hostility 
or carping criticism, but as proper material 
for a frank, free and fair discussion of pres- 
ent-day working class problems. 

The Journal has on numerous occasions 
praised and defended Mr. Gompers. In only 
one previous instance has he been criticized 
in these columns. And it is a singular fact 
that he filed a protest against that criticism, 
too. 

Now, Mr. Gompers is good enough to say 
"he has an abiding faith that the editor of 
the Journal would not care to consciously 
do the American Federation of Labor or 
himself an unwarrantable injustice." He is 
right. The editor of the Journal would 
not consciously do the worst labor-crusher 
an "unwarrantable" injustice. But it is not 
for Mr. Gompers alone to determine what 
is an "unwarrantable" injustice. That ques- 
tion, in the final analysis, must be and will 
be settled by the men who elect Presidents, 
editors and other trade-union officials. 

Mr. Gompers on one occasion expressed 
the wish that he would like "to die in the 
harness" — i. e., while serving the labor move- 
ment. It is very likely that his wish will 
be gratified. He has already made his mark 
in the world and fully deserves considerate 
treatment at the hands of American trade- 
unionists. He should not. however, expect 
to be entirely immune from criticism. Ab- 
ject veneration of the aged is a Chinese cus- 
tom. It has its advantages, but does not fit 
into a labor democracy. 

To be sure, there are those who contend 
that loyalty to the labor movement demands 
an unquestioned following of Samuel (^lom- 
pers. To argue with men who have adopted 
that process of reasoning is worse than folly. 
The American Federation of Labor was 
never intended to be an oligarchy. To the 
contrary, it was founded upon (to quote 
from the preamble) : the "struggle going on 
in all the nations of the civilized world be- 
tween the oppressors and the oppressed of 
all countries, a struggle between the capital- 
ist and the laborer, which grows in intensity 
from year to year," etc. 

To that struggle the Journal is dedicated. 
To fight the battle of the oppressed is its 
noble mission. 

To conquer the world for the workers is 
indeed a glorious and worthy aim. To fol- 
low Mr. Gompers when he leads in that 
direction is a great privilege. To criticize 
and oppose him when he heads the other 
way should be a sacred duty. 



Smoke only blue-labeled cigars! 



SEAMEN'S ACCIDENT INSURANCE. 



Since September 2, 1914, the Federal Gov- 
ernment through the Bureau of War Risk 
Insurance in the Treasury Department has 
been writing insurance on American vessels 
engaged in foreign trade, with their cargoes. 
This form of social insurance covering risks 
to property has been remarkably successful. 
If the Federal Government had not assumed 
these war risks, the marine insurance rates 
charged by the private companies would have 
been much more deadly to our overseas trade 
than the German sea raiders and submarines. 
From September 2, 1914, to December 31, 
1916, the War Risk Insurance Bureau wrote 
1791 policies, amounting to $182,203,080, for 
which premiums aggregating $3,244,784.04 
were collected. The net losses for this period 
were $774,868.73. From January 1, 1917, to 
June 30, 1917, the bureau wrote 4527 poli- 
cies for $441,761,518 with premiums amount- 
ing to $11,963,945.33. The net losses from 
September 2, 1914, to June 30, 1917, amount- 
ed to $10,176,435.36. 

This experiment with social insurance cov- 
ering property losses is most interesting and 
instructive. The success in this venture no 
doubt suggested the extension of social in- 
surance to cover seamen who are exposed to 
the extraordinary risks of operating the in- 
sured vessels carrying insured cargoes 
through seas strewn with mines and infested 
with commerce destroyers above and below 
the water. Since ships and cargoes have 
been insured successfully by the Government, 
the lives and limbs of seamen should likewise 
be insured. This much has already been 
conceded by Congress. But for reasons 
which are difficult to fathom seamen em- 
ployed on American ships, not sailing to 
war zone, are still denied that protection 
against ordinary industrial accidents which 
is given to the workers ashore by practically 
every State in the LTnion and by the Fed- 
eral Government to its own employes every- 
where. 

In view of the fact that the different States 
cannot, under a recent Supreme Court de- 
cision, protect their seamen against indus- 
trial accidents even if they are disposed 
to do so, is it not high time for Congress 
to enact an equitable compensation law for 
all American seamen? 



SLURRING AMERICAN SEAMEN. 



For more than a decade there has been 
industrial peace in the marine transportation 
industry of the three States bordering on 
the Pacific Ocean. This happy state of af- 
fairs has for its basis a material desire to 
"play fair." 

So far as the organized seamen are con- 
cerned there is an ardent hope and wish that 
this condition may be continued indefinitely. 
And for that matter, one is fully justified in 
assuming that Pacific Coast shipowners have 
the same desire. At any rate, the Journal 
is convinced that both sides which count in 
the maintenance of industrial peace would 
go to almost any length to avoid industrial 
turmoil while our country is engaged in the 
titanic struggle to make the world safe for 
democracy. 

Unfortunately, a third factor is now busily 
engaged injecting ill-will and distrust into 
otherwise perfectly harmonious relations. A 
few years ago a couple of young snobs, 
without any knowledge or experience of 
maritime affairs, conceived the brilliant idea 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



of making an easy living by starting a 
monthly shipping publication. From a pure- 
ly mercenary point of view the paper seems 
to have been a success. Shipping and ship- 
building has been booming of late and the 
advertising game has been "easy." But the 
"success" of the venture ends right then 
and there. From the very beginning the 
green young man who edits the paper has 
insisted (1) to show his ignorance of nau- 
tical affairs and particularly of the human 
element therein, and (2) to cast mean, con- 
temptible and cowardly slurs at American 
seamen and at all other mariners not born 
in China or Japan. 

Now our country is engaged in the great 
struggle to crush Prussian Militarism, and 
although American merchant seamen by the 
thousands have fearlessly shipped for service 
in the war zone, the slurs of that conceited 
little man are becoming more and more 
vicious. 

It may be neither sedition nor treason 
to libel and insult the brave men who have 
so cheerfully and voluntarily faced the sub- 
marine peril, but it does seem as if the pa- 
triotic American shipowners and shipbuilders 
who have in the past subsidized that libelous 
sheet should promptly withdraw their sup- 
port. By doing so they will not only ef- 
fectively muzzle an irresponsible young man, 
but will also dispel any erroneously created 
impression that they have ever been in sym- 
pathy with guttersnipe journalism. 



Specimen flags from the design selected 
for the Government-owned merchant marine 
by the United States Shipping Board have 
been forwarded to Washington for approval. 
The new flag was designed by Charles Col- 
lens, a Boston architect and designer. It has 
a pure white field with the national shield in 
full color in tli center showing the red, white 
and blue, supported by an anchor in blue, 
and the words U. S. on the left, and S. B. 
on the right, for the United States Shipping 
Board. Most of the flags will measure nine 
feet long and six feet wide, size to be flown 
by vessels of 8000 tons or more. The flags 
are to be sent to each of the 300 vessels 
taken over from private shipping companies, 
either in process of construction or com- 
pleted. They also will be sent to each of 
the 98 former German steamers, seized by 
this Government, the German ships handed 
over to the United States by the Government 
of Cuba, and each of the 1000 ships to be 
built by the Shipping Board. 



PEOPLE'S SELF-GOVERNMENT. 



The Pacific Mail Steamship Company in the 
six months to lune 30 last earned almost $3 a 
share on its 230,000 shares of common stock 
($5 par). This is after deducting the half year's 
proportion of dividends on the $1,700,000 7 per 
cent, preferred. Actual profits for this period 
were $759,217, exceeding by $268,751 net earnings 
for the corresponding period of 1916. — News 
item from the "financial page." 

Only a short while ago we were told edi- 
torially by practically every daily paper in 
the country that "the Seamen's bill had driven 
the Pacific Mail Company out of business." 
And now the corpse is very much alive and 
earning more money than ever in history. 
Besides the Mail Company is now employing 
more white seamen and fewer Orientals than 
ever before. Oh, how the prophets have 
come to grief! 



The "labor leader" who fully appreciates 
the responsibility of his office is to be com- 
mended ; but the "labor leader" who falls 
into the error of regarding himself as in- 
dispensable is in need of a severe corrective. 



Kings, Kaisers and Cabinets of Capitcilism Could 

Not Exist Except for Ignorance and 

Indifference of Workers. 



In an interview with an American paper Mr. 
I.loyd George announces that the great objective 
of the Allies is the wining of "freedom for the 
people to govern themselves." 

It is a noble ideal. It is one tliat makes a 
powerful appeal to my instincts and my con- 
victions. It is because I believe in it with my 
whole heart and soul that I am in the labor 
movement today. 

"Freedom for the people to govern them- 
selves" is the principle that inspires the greatest 
agitation that the world has ever known. 

But — I fail to see how we are going to 
realize that principle merely by defeating the 
Central Powers. 

In every land the slavery of the people has 
its roots at home, and not in a foreign soil. 
This is true even of countries groaning under a 
foreign yoke. Strike down the alien tyrant, and 
the servitude of the masses will still continue. 

They are enslaved by men of their own blood. 
The chains they wear are forged by their own 
hands. 

In the country of Lloyd George the people 
have never been free to govern themselves. To- 
da}' he is virtually a dictator there. He wields 
powers more tremendous than any British ruler 
ever contemplated in his wildest dreams of 
domination. 

Yet he does not use them to free the people 
of Britain. He dare not do so. 

That is because the greatest enemy of British 
freedom is not a far-off foe, but the dwellers in 
their own camp. 

A similar position exists in all the nations of 
the earth. No victory won on the battlefield 
can liberate them. 

The whole of the civilized peoples are in 
bondage to the social system under which they 
live. They are the mental slaves of custom 
and tradition, and tliis inward enslavement 
materializes in political and industrial fetters so 
tightlj' riveted upon them that one despairs of 
ever striking them off. 

As a matter of fact, one cannot strike them 
off. They must be shaken off by those who 
wear them. 

Even in Australia — this most favored of 
lands — the people are not free to govern them- 
selves. We have the universal franchise — a 
measure of power they do not enjoy in Europe. 
We elect representatives to Parliament. We 
have a Constitution guaranteeing us the fullest 
liberty of self-expression. 

And yet we are not free — not even upon 
the surface. At the present moment we have 
in office a Prime Minister and a Cabinet in 
direct antagonism to the will of the people. 

If, then, with a wide national charter and a 
franchise without limitations, the people of Aus- 
tralia are not so much as politically free, 
imagine how thorougli is their subjection in 
the spliere of economics, in which not even the 
forms of liberty have been won. 

As long as the vast majority of men and 
women can only live by laboring for the profit 
of others, it cannot rightly he said that they 
are free to govern themselves. 

Self-government must .cover the entire field 
of existence and endeavor, or it is but a term of 
mockery. It must give the people control, not 
of Parliament only, but of the organization of 
industry. The production and distribution of 
wealth must be in their hands. 

They must have the shaping of their own 
destinies. Social institutions must be the reflex 
of their desires, and spring from an intelligent 
apprehension of their best interests. 

It is too much to hope that the deluge of 
blood will have such results. Some who pose 
in the limelight of the war as fervent patriots, 
who prattle with Lloyd George about setting 
the people free to govern themselves, are our 
fiercest and most implacable opponents in the 
real struggle for emancipation. 

Yet the aftermath of the mad slaughter that 
is going on will surely teach the people that 
their own ignorance and indifference are the 
tyrannies they have most to fear. 

And should that prove to be the case, then 
the time will have come for the Kings, Kaisers 
and Cabinets of Capitalism to slink into the 
limbo of a nightmare past, and for the people 
to be free at last to govern themselves. — H. E. 
B., in the Australian Worker. 



During the month of .August the ninnlicr of 
foreign offshore vessels entering and leaving 
Seattle eclipsed every past record by ten ves- 
sels, according to statistics compiled by the 
Merchants' Exchange. All told forty-four ves- 
sels of Japanese. British, Norwegian, Swedish, 
Dutch and English registry were recorded in 
port as having arrived or departed during the 
period. The previous high mark in numl)er 
of ships was in May, 1916, when thirty-four 
foreign vessels were recorded entering or clear- 
ing here. Of the forty-four vessels, twenty-five 
were operated by the three Japanese steamship 
lines, whereas in 1916 the Frank Waterhousc 
Company operated twelve of the thirty-four 
vessels, leading all individual concerns. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 4, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping fair. A second donation of $100 
was made to the striking street carmen of 
San Francisco. 

Monday, September 10, being Admission Day, 
the regular weekly meeting was therefore post- 
poned to Tuesday, September 11. A synopsis 
of the said meeting will be published in next 
week's issue. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 3, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

REGINALD TOWNSEND. Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 3, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 3, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 3, 1917. 
Shipping good. 

P. B. GILL. Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 3, 1917. 
No meeting. Prospects uncertain. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 3, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; prospects good. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 3, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping very good. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 3, 1917. 
Shipping dull; prospects fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN. Agent. 
1281/4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Aug. 27, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping good. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 6, 1917. 
No meeting; shipping good. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 

Seattle Agency, Aug. 30, 1917. 
No meeting; no quorum. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Aug. 30, 1917. 
No meeting; shipping good. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., IZSyi 6th St. Phone Home 
115, Sunset 335. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 3, 1917. 
No meeting; shipping good. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



DIED, 

Axel Wilhelm Ekberg, No. 932, a native of 
Sweden, age 33, drowned from schooner "Rosa- 
mond," at sea, July 22, 1917. 

Johan Conrad Comstcdt, No. 1140, a na- 
tive of Sweden, age 36, died at San Francisco, 
Cal., August 20, 1917. 

Edward Matlson, No. 18.56, a native of Fm- 
land, died at San Pedro, Cal., August 23, 1917. 



The Standard Oil Company has changed the 
name of the motor-ship under construction at 
the Benicia Shipbuilding Corporation yards from 
"Andrew Mahony" to "Oronitc." The ship was 
•purchased several months ago from Andy Ma- 
hony for $275,000. The "Oronitc" is a sister 
ship to the motor-ship "La Merced," purchased 
from Mahony at the same time as the "Oro- 
nitc." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



This Labor Day found the national capital 
stirred chiefly by two developments — the di- 
verijcnce of opinion as to what part the 
org;anized workers in the United States should 
take in labor conferences abroad with regard 
to terms of settlement of the war, and of 
problems arising from the fact of the war, 
and the new attempt of the mine owners of 
the West to crush all organized labor in the 
mining regions. 

No one writing of labor aflFairs from 
Washington just now could honestly ignore 
the dispute over the People's Council and 
the Alliance for Labor and Democracy. The 
national convention of the People's Council, 
which was to have been held in Minneapolis, 
and which included a large number of dele- 
gates from all of the garment trades, the 
machinists and various trades identified as 
"radical" in their majority membership, has 
been driven from Minnesota by Governor 
Bumquist. Mayor Van Lear of IVTinncapolis, 
district organizer of the International Asso- 
ciation of Machinists, has been shorn of po- 
lice power by the Governor, who some time 
ago took an active part in suppressing strikes 
on the Mesaba iron range. 

President Gompers of the A. F. of L. has 
become an active leader in the Alliance for 
Labor and Democracy, organized by a group 
of former Socialists and some New York- 
trade unionists, to oppose the work of the 
People's Council. He has announced that he 
does not approve Governor Burnquist's arbi- 
trary suppression of the People's Council 
convention in Minneapolis, when the Gov- 
ernor ha? oflfered no criticism of the coming 
of the rival convention. Others prominent in 
the Alliance are equally disappointed that the 
People's Council has been discriminatcfl 
against, when they wanted to "argue it out" 
on a basis of reason and not of bayonets. 

During the past week Mr. Gompers sent a 
telegram to all of the paid organizers of the 
A. F. of L., instructing them to devote their 
efforts to getting representative labor men 
and unions to send delegates to the conven- 
tion of the Alliance. At the same time, ef- 
forts were being made by local spokesmen of 
both the Alliance and the People's Council, 
in various cities, to get the same central 
bodies and local unions to send delegates to 
their own convention. 

.\s the People's Council program is one of 
hastening the end of the war by generous 
terms of peace, and of insistence upon a 
high labor standard during the war, and on 
early repeal of the draft, while the Alliance 
takes the position that the war must be fought 
through to a finish in order that democracy 
may survive in the world, the same struggle 
now going on in the British and French labor 
movements is repeated within the American 
Federation of Labor. Roughly speaking, the 
conservative majority element in the A. F. 
of L. is with the Alliance; the radical mi- 
nority is with the Council. There are cross- 
currents of interest, due to the place of na- 
tivity of groups of workers in various crafts, 
but in general the "open forum" debate now 
going forward as to whether the A. F. of L. 
membership shall take part in framing the 
foreign policy of the United States, and in 
what direction and for what end, is but a 
new expression of the old cleavage in the 
labor movement everywhere — the cleavage 
between "left" and "right." 

The second great labor interest that is no- 



ticeable in Washington this Labor Day is 
the trouble centering in Arizona, and reaching 
out through all the region west of the Mis- 
souri River. The metal mine owners have 
gone on the warpath against all unions in the 
mining camps. Armed mobs have deported 
great numbers of peaceful strikers. Federal 
troops at Globe and Miami, Ariz., have pre- 
vented the deportation of hundreds of other 
strikers, but now they are reported to have 
forbidden picketing, and to have permitted 
the bringing of a private army of gimmen 
into the Miami district. Labor organizers 
report that mob violence and even lynching 
of active trade unionists may soon take place. 

John Murray of Los Angeles and Wash- 
ington, organizer for the A. F. of L., recent- 
ly was sent here as a delegate from the con- 
vention of the Arizona State Federation of 
Labor, to get the A. F. of L. to take up 
with President Wilson the necessity of re- 
storing civil law in Bisbee and throughout 
the State. The case was put up to the Presi- 
dent by Mr, Gompers, and the President 
agreed to have a commission go to Arizona 
and other Western States to report on the 
causes of the lawlessness and strikes now 
prevalent, and to suggest remedies. 

That commission has not yet been named. 
Meanwhile Murray has been to Indianapolis 
and has conferred with Messrs. John P. 
White, William Green and Frank Hayes, in- 
ternational officers of the LTnited Mine Work- 
ers of America. They suggested a general 
conference of officers of all the national and 
international unions having members in the 
States affected by the "Loyalty League" 
lawlessness, to take definite action to protect 
the union forces there. 

In connection with the copper strikes has 
been raised the cry that the Industrial Work- 
ers of the World were getting into control 
of organized labor. On this pretext the 
agents of the federal Department of Justice, 
with the astuteness that generally marks the 
detective's trade, have invaded the offices of 
the United Mine Workers in Indianapolis, to 
get evidence of I. W. W. plots. They have 
arrested labor organizers in various cities. 
Men of local police authority put three or- 
ganizers of the International L'^nion of ATine, 
Mill and Smelter Workers on a train at 
Grand Rapids, Mich., some days since, and 
compelled them to leave town. There are 
clay miners in the vicinity, and an attempt to 
organize tliem was proof of I. W. W. plot- 
ting. 

It is possible that President Wilson or the 
Secretary of War will see that further de- 
portations from Arizona are prevented, and 
that the Bisbee miners are escorted safely 
back to their homes. But if this action is 
not taken, the conference of labor organiza- 
tions may decide on some other program — 
such, for example, as a nation-wide protest 
and appeal to Congress. 

* * * 

During the past week the International 
Longshoremen's Association, through T. V. 
O'Connor of Buffalo, its president, signed a 
separate "labor treaty" with the LTnited 
States Shipping Board and the War Depart- 
ment, Navy Department and owners of At- 
lantic, Pacific and Gulf steamship lines. This 
agreement is better than the one signed re- 
cently by the crafts in the shipyards with the 
Shipping Board, since it specifies that "union 
wages, hours and conditions" in the several 
ports shall be recognized. 

A special national commission and local 
commissions representing the various parties 



to the agreement will decide all industrial dis- 
putes as to the loading and unloading of 
ships. The central board will act only when 
local adjustment is found impossible. 

Although it is not found in the language 
of this agreement, it is a fact that the Great 
Lakes are not brought under the new plan. 
Longshoremen there will continue to strike 
as before. This is because the Steel Trust, 
through its control of the Lake Carriers' As- 
sociation of steamship lines, refused to enter 
into any agreement with the Longshoremen. 
The same course was taken by the Steel 
Trust in the case of the recent agreement of 
the International Seamen's Union and the 
associations of licensed officers with the own- 
ers of steam and sailing vessels on the At- 
lantic, the Pacific and the Gulf. The Great 
Lakes remain outlaw territory. 

It is possible that at the meeting of the 
Lake Carriers' Association next week a more 
conciliatory policy will be adopted. If so, 
the Longshoremen, and even more the Sea- 
men, will gain a fine triumph. Andrew Furu- 
seth is authority for the statement that the 
.Secretary of Commerce, by merely enforcing 
the plain provisions of the Seamen's Act, 
now ignored by his inspectors on the Lakes, 
could at any time whip the Steel Trust into 
line as to its labor policy in the Lake trade. 
* * * 

J. W. Sullivan, representing the A. F. of 
L. in the Wheat Price Fixing Committee, 
stood out for a price of $1.84 for this year's 
wheat crop, when the farmers' spokesmen 
wanted $2.50. The compromise at $2.20, Chi- 
cago basis, was due largely to Sullivan's de- 
termined stand. 



NOTHING NEW IN FINGER PRINTS. 



The Chinese, Japanese, and Tibetans all 
applied ages ago, with full consciousness, 
the system of finger-prints for the purpose 
of identifying individuals. The Moham- 
medan authors who visited China did not 
fail to describe this system. Rashideddin, 
the famous Persian historian, who wrote in 
1303, reports as follows: 

"When matters have passed the six 
boards of the Chinese they are remitted to 
the council of state, where they arc dis- 
cussed, and the decision is issued after 
being verified by the khat angusht, or 
'finger-signature,' of all who have a right 
to a voice in the council. . . . It is 
usual in Cathay (China), when any con- 
tract is entered into, for the outline of the 
finfcrs of the parties to be traced upon the 
document. For experience .shows that no 
two individuals have fingers precisely alike. 
The hand of the contracting party is set 
ujion the back of the paper containing the 
deed, and lines are then traced round his 
if ever one of them should deny his obliga- 
fingers of the parties to be traced upon the 
ton this tracing may be compared with his 
fingers and he niav thus be convicted." 



Hell Gate bridge represents a mass of 
10.000 tons of steel alone. From pier to 
pier the arch s])ans an interval of 1017 feet, 
making it the longest steel arch in the 
world and the heaviest bridge of any de- 
scription ever built across an obstacle. Two 
massive towers support the enormous 
weight. They rise to a height of 250 feet 
on each side of the river. The ends of 
the bridge rest upon four ponderous shoes 
of cast steel, each weighing 500,000 pounds, 
the largest castings ever made. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



W. W. FALLACIES. 

(By Jay Fox.) 



"I see by the papers," said dub, "that the 
good law-abiding citizens of Butte, invaded 
a hotel, kidnaped a man named Frank Little, 
an L W. W. organizer, took him to a rail- 
road bridge and hung him. I'd like to know 
what kind of a desperado that man Little 
must have been to have aroused these civil- 
ized. Christian gentlemen to the perpetration 
of an act which, if committed on the Euro- 
pean battlefield, they would themselves de- 
nominate as ruthless German barbarity?" 

"Frank W. Little was not a desperado," 
said the union man. "On the contrary, he 
was a peace-loving American, an idealist, 
striving to aid his fellow workers in their 
efforts to hold their own against one of the 
largest and most powerful trusts in the world 
— the copper trust ; and his murder was the 
most cowardly, the most bloodthirsty, outrag- 
eous ever committed in the interest of organ- 
ized capital. 

"Little was a labor organizer. Who was 
interested in getting him out of the way? 
Who but the employers of the men he is 
charged with helping to organize — the Ana- 
conda Copper Company. That gigantic cor- 
poration has the working people of Butte by 
the throats. By the power of Its vast wealth 
it dominates the business and commercial in- 
terests of people and no business man dares 
to offend it at his peril. He would be ruined. 
As a consequence the petty business men, a 
pack of cowardly sycophants, cringe and 
scrape at the feet of the big corporation, 
and fall over each other in their efforts to 
serve it. The city and county officials are 
Its lackeys, the newspapers Its mouthpieces. 

"The workers have been the only people 
who have ever questioned the power of the 
gigantic copper company to rule the des- 
tinies of the largest mining camp in the 
world, a city with a population of nearly a 
hundred thousand. 

"The miners of Butte had a union once, 
and, largely through the efforts of the mis- 
guided organization that Frank Little repre- 
sented, that union was disrupted. With the 
downfall of the miners' union a reign of 
reaction was established. The Socialist 
mayor was unseated, and only recently this 
ex-mayor was prevented from addressing a 
public meeting in the city — without offering 
an excuse the police closed the hall and for- 
bade the citizens to hold a peaceful meeting 
to discuss their grievances. Russia in the 
palmiest days of the Czar never witnessed 
such Czarlstic tyranny. 

"Having the big miners' union as a back- 
ground, the building and miscellaneous trades 
became well organized In Butte, and have en- 
joyed comparatively good working conditions. 
Indeed Butte was the best organized city In 
the world. But, since the downfall of the 
miners' union, the employers have been 
scheming to destroy all the other labor un- 
ions, and the recent attempt to establish a 
union among the miners has met with their 
bitterest opposition. 

"The foul and dastardly murder of Little 
was planned and executed for the purpose of 
terrorizing the workers into a meek submis- 
sion to the absolute will of the copper com- 
pany. It is to be hoped that the reverse 
effect will be produced. If I judge the work- 
ers rightly they will resent this heinous out- 
rage upon the working class and their an- 
swer will be the establishment of a union 
stronger and more aggressive than the pre- 
vious one. 



"I don't think the I. W. W. can establish 
such a union; I don't think it should. It 
tried to establish a union on the ruins of the 
one it destroyed. After a brief career it 
went to pieces. That is the history of every 
union it organized. Nowhere has it left any- 
thing permanent. Everywhere ruin and dis- 
aster followed In its wake. 

"I think the I. W. W. Is a huge mistake. 
It Is theoretic unionism gone to seed. It is 
an interloper In the field of organized labor. 
It should never have been organized, and 
many of the well meaning but misguided men 
who were active In its early history have so 
admitted to me. It Is a dual organization, 
and every union man knows that dualism has 
been the greatest curse of the labor move- 
ment. 

"The I. W. W. Is a wild-worded calumlna- 
tor of the labor movement out of which it 
sprung. It goes before the unorganized and 
attacks with all the venom of fanaticism the 
labor movement, thus injuring the cause it 
seeks to champion. The effect of its propa- 
ganda has been most disastrous, especially 
among the timber workers of the South and 
West, where it is now most difficult to ap- 
proach these workers with the message of 
unionism. 

"It is said the I. W. W. is radical, and 
on that ground claims the support of the 
progressive element in the labor world. In 
what Is it radical ? It is radical in words 
that It cannot fulfill. It Is radical In prom- 
ises it cannot make good. It shouts loudly 
about what ought to be done without the least 
capacity for doing it. Is that radical? 

"It talks about fighting, but it is rounded 
up In herds and thrown into jail without re- 
sistance ; then It comes to us to burn money 
to hire lawyers. Is that radical? (When it 
comes to real action on the job the American 
Federation of Labor has it backed off the 
map.) It has sapped the labor movement of 
some of Its most active and aggressive fight- 
ers and made mere knockers out of them. Is 
that radical? 

"It has a centralized, autocratic form of 
organization discarded by the workers of 
America 30 years ago when they abandoned 
the Knights of Labor for the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. Is that radical? 

"The industrial unionism It brags about is 
purely theoretic and has to evolve in the 
various Industries out of the experience of 
the trades unions In these Industries. This 
evolution is proceeding carefully, but progres- 
sively in the various industries and, all things 
considered, there is no other possible way by 
which industrial unionism could be estab- 
lished. Is It more radical to talk about a 
thing than to do it? 

"It talks about working class solidarity and 
spends about half its time and energy attack- 
ing and vilifying the organized labor move- 
ment, instead of concentrating all its time 
upon the common enemy. Is that radical? 

"I repeat: The I. W. W. Is not only a 
mistake. It Is a serious disaster. But it is 
composed of part of the working class, mis- 
taken though it be ; and when the common 
enemy strikes at the organized workers 
through one of its members, I am up in 
arms, and I place a wreath on the martyr's 
grave and swear anew by his memory my 
fealty to the cause of labor." 



If some of our critics were judged by 
their errors, as they arc so prone to judge 
us, their measure of rating would probably 
not run as high as they are forced to give 
us. 



Notice to Seamen 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seamjin who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 

children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



"WAR WORK AND UNION STANDARDS." 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



one of its members, remain at the site to sup- 
ply any further information that may be asked. 

"8. The rulings of the commission are bind- 
ing upon all parties concerned. 

"9. Notice of a ruling shall be sent to the 
contracting officer and to the spokesmen ot the 
parties involved in the dispute. 

"10. The examiner will supervise the appli- 
cation of the commission's rulings with refer- 
ence to hours, wages and conditions and with 
reference to any accounting which may be 



proper under such ruling. Any change in wages, 
hours or their application, when finally agreed 
to, or when finally fixed by the commission, 
shall for accounting purposes be effective so far 
as practicable as of the date which may be fixed 
by the agreement, or by the ruling of the 
commission. 

"11. The commission shall have power to 
make additional regulations in order to achieve 
the purposes of the memorandum, and shall de- 
cide all questions arising under it." 

In order to deal expeditiously with local diffi- 
culties the cantonment adjustment commission 
appointed the following regional investigators: 



Examiners. 
William O. Thompson, 
Robert W. Bruerc, 

Alternate. 



National Army 
District. Cantonments. 

f.\yer, Mass. 
^'aphank, L. I. 
Wrightstown, N. J. 
I Annapolis Junction, Md. 
Petersburg, Va. 



Walter B. Wilbur No. 2. 



.Atlanta, Ga. 
Columbia, S. C. 



Morton A. Aldrich No. 3 



1 Little Rock, Ark | 



1 



1 



Not yet designated No. 4.... 



Fort Sam Houston, Tex. 



f Chillicothe, Ohio. 

J. E. Williams No. 5 \ Louisville, Ky. 

[ Battle Creek, Mich. 

r Rockford, 111 
■j Des Moines, 
t Fort Riley, 



National Guard 
Encampments. 



Augusta, Ga. 
Fayetteville, N. C. 
Greenville, S. C. 
Spartanburg, S. C. 
Macon, Ga. 

Montgomery, Ala. 
Anniston, Ala. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Hatticsburg, Miss. 

Houston, Tex. 
Fort Sill, Okla. 
Waco, Tex. 
Fort Worth, Tex. 
Deniing, N. M. 



L. A. Halbert No. 6. 



Iowa. 
Kans. 



Carleton H. Parker. 



; 



..No. 7. ...•; American Lake, W'ash.. 



i Palo Alto, Cal. 
I Linda Vista, Cal. 



Since the June 19 memorandum was signed 
by Secretary Baker and President Gompers, the 
Quartermaster General sent instructions to all 
local construction officers to use for all work- 
ers on cantonment construction the union scale 
of wages and hours in force in that locality on 
June 1. 1917. 

As costs of living have been increasing rap- 
idly in the past months and may be subject to 
further variation due to war conditions pro- 
vision is made for application to the adjustment 
commission to consider reasons why higher 
wages should be paid. In order that wage- 
scales may be increased when deemed wise by 
the adjustment commission contracts for can- 
tonment construction contain a clause which en- 
ables contractors to secure additional reimburse- 
ment to cover any increases in wages. 

In all of its policies and determinations rela- 
tive to cantonment construction the War De- 
partment has manifested a desire to maintain 
standards for workers and at the same time to 
assure to contractors fair treatment. 

So satisfactory were the results of the opera- 
tions under the memorandum of June 19 that 
on July 27 Secretary Baker and President Gom- 
pers signed an additional memorandum extend- 
ing the application of the first memorandum to 
construction work in aviation fields as well as 
to all other war emergency construction, in- 
cluding repairs. The additional memorandum 
is as follows: 

"Washington, D. C, July 27, 1917. 

"The arrangement for the adjustment of 
wages, hours and conditions of labor, entered 
into between the signers of this memorandum 
on June 19, 1917, with reference to cantonment 
construction, may. on order of the Secretary of 
War, be extended to embrace any other con- 
struction work which is now being, or may from 
time to time during the war be carried on by 
the War Department. 

"NEWTON D. BAKER, 

"Secretary of War. 
"SAMUEL GOMPERS. 
"President American Federation of Labor." 

On August 10, the Secretary of the Navy en- 
dorsed the memorandum of June 19, and agreed 
to extend the operation of the Cantonment Ad- 
justment Commission to all work on land which 
was or should be done for the Navy Depart- 
ment. The necessity for closer relations be- 
tween the two departments was made conclusive 
bv a labor difficulty arising between the em- 
ployes of Henry Steers Company and that firm. 
Carpenters working on construction work which 
Henry Steers Company had contracted to per- 
form for the Navy, protested against conditions 
which required them to break one of the rules 
of their brotherhood. When the construction 
company failed to adjust the grievance, a strike 
took place. I'ndcr the rules of the international 
all carpenters working anywhere in the country 
for the employer under whom the difficulty 
arose, must also stop work. This situation 
threatened a strike on all cantonment work for 
the government. 

Conferences were held between representatrves 
of the company, of organized labor and of the 



government. The company agreed to the condi- 
tions for which the carpenters contended. Sec- 
retary Daniels of the Navy Department agreed 
to submit all labor difficulties on cantonment 
work to the Cantonment Adjustment Commis- 
sion upon which a representative of the Navy 
Department will sit when matters affecting the 
Navy are under consideration. 

Another big forward step is the arrangement 
by which the Navy Department will be repre- 
sented by a naval official on the Emergency 
Construction Committee which recommends 
names of contractors to whom contracts will 
be let. The committee have expressed their de- 
sire to have a representative of organized labor 
among their number in order to have the benefit 
of the views of the workers. 

Under these simple memoranda which recog- 
nize the human values in war construction work 
and provide for the maintenance of standards 
which enable the workers to earn a decent living 
and to consider themselves treated as men of 
dignity and value, the cantonment construction 
work has been progressing with the least possi- 
ble friction growing out of labor difficulties. 
Whenever complaints have been presented they 
have been promptly dealt with by the labor ad- 
justment commission; usually it has been enough 
simply to call the construction officers' attention 
to the fact that the War Department has ordered 
that the union scale of wages and hours estab- 
lished for that vicinity be applied to the con- 
struction work. Some difficulty has grown out 
of the fact that one of the established condi- 
tions of work in many localities has been the 
union shop. Many workers have fought and 
sacrificed in order to establish this protection 
hut when they understood the position of the 
War Department they have invariably yielded 
to the war situation. Though sympathetically 
inclined the War Department does not feel that 
it can legally maintain a union shop for govern- 
ment work but it has sanctioned union standards 
of hours and work as necessary to maintain 
efficiency, to protect life and health, and prose- 
cute the war to final victory. 

In addition to the splendid agreement under 
which difficulties arising out of cantonment con- 
struction will be dealt with immediately, thus 
avoiding interruption of work, the Metal Trades 
Department of the A. F. of L. has secured an 
understanding by which wage agreements in all 
of the government navy yards will be reopened. 
With the successive and rapid increases in the 
costs of living workers in the government navy 
yards have found it very difficult to maintain 
standards of living on wages under existing 
agreements. Requests for higher wages were 
made by various different organizations and 
these were all regularly taken up with the navy 
officials. 

To deal with the problem comprehensively and 
effectively the Secretary of the Navy has issued 
an order calling meetings of the wage boards 
of the various navy yards. The workers in 
the yards will, through their representatives, 
present their cases to the proper authorities. 
Data which these boards collect will in turn be 
submitted on .\ugust 24 to a central wage board 



which will consist of a representative of the 
Navy (.Assistant Secretary Roosevelt), a repre- 
sentative of the War Department (Walter Lipp- 
iiian), and a representative of the Department 
of Labor (William Blackmon). The appoint- 
ment of this central board represents an im- 
portant forward step as it will facilitate the 
adjustment of difficulties and will enable the 
government to maintain or improve conditions 
in all of the yards, thus eliminating a cause 
that has created much difficulty and it will pro- 
tect the workers by enabling them to present 
their cause to an agency with power to act. 

The Navy Department has long maintained an 
established policy of dealing with the representa- 
tives of organized labor and this new arrange- 
ment will help materially in maintaining union 
standards and in facilitating work necessary for 
the war. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



"In Washington, New York, Chicago 
and San Francisco, within the last 30 
days, I have heard men rail at labor for 
demanding higher wages, and a thought 
has occurred to me. I have wondered 
which was the greater crime, for a work- 
ingman who is fighting for merely enough 
to live on and support his family to 
strike for higher wages, or for the presi- 
dent of the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion to go to Washington and arrogantly 
demand of the United States government 
$80 a ton for steel which it costs less than 
$40 to manufacture. If the German kaiser 
is behind the workmen's strike, who is 
behind the Steel Corporation? 

"The recruiting of the ranks of the I. 
W. W. from among peaceful and law- 
abiding workingmen is a mighty danger- 
ous symptom. The vicious doctrine of 
this organization only falls upon fruitful 
soil when it is spread among working- 
men rendered desperate in the fight for 
existence by seeing the necessities of life 
soaring to unprecedented prices while mil- 
lions are being coined by 'pawnbroker 
patriots' from the needs and miseries of 
the nation." 



Street Car Men Win. 

The Kansas City, Missouri, street car 
company has failed in its attempt to dis- 
rupt the Street Car Men's union and after 
a nine-days' strike 2,000 employes are 
again at work. Union committees are 
recognized,, arbitration machinery secured 
and all strikers are reinstated. Wages 
will be considered later. 

When the company was asking for a 
franchise, a few years ago, it accepted a 
l)rovision guaranteeing the right of organ- 
ization to employes. The repudiation of 
this agreement, which was the main cause 
of the strike, was referred to as follows 
by the Kansas City Star : 

"The company has placed its own self 
at a complete di.sadvantage in its conten- 
tion over the right of its employes to 
organize, by guaranteeing them that right 
in the franchise. It was inserted to catch 
the labor vote — but it is there, and the 
company cannot expect to evade its con- 
tract to furnish street car service to Kan- 
sas City in order to break its own agree- 
ment with the men." 



War prevents the concentration of mind 
that is essential to intellectual growth. It 
shocks into a revaluation of human institu- 
tions, but has nothing constructive to offer 
in the building of progress. 



Organization is the spirit of the age. 
Has the spirit moved you to action? 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



OH! GRATITUDE! 



Mr. George Vickerson, secretary of the 
Middlesbrough Branch of the National Sail- 
ors and Firemen's Union of Great Britain 
and Ireland, recently wrote to the North- 
Eastern Daily Gazette as follows : 

"The following is a plain unvarnished 
statement made to me a few days ago by one 
of our local seamen: 'I signed articles in 

the s.s. on the 5th June this year, and 

went to Hull to load. After loading, we then 
proceeded on our voyage, everything going 
on all right until we were going down chan- 
nel off the Isle of Wight. About 7:30 p. m. 
we sighted a German submarine, submerged, 
and then the next thing we knew he got us 
fair amidships with a torpedo in No. 2 hold. 
We got away all right in our boats and laid 
to, clear of the .ship, and the submarine came 
up and went after another boat and torpedoed 
it also. As the submarine seemed to have 
cleared ofif, our captain a.sked if any of us 
would volunteer to go back to the ship. The 
deck officers volunteered, the chief engineer 
could not go as he had his leg broken, and 
the second and third engineers reckoned they 
could not swim. The captain then asked me 
if I could start the engines, and I said, "We 
will manage somehow" (being donkeyman), 
and eight of us sailors and firemen went back, 
not knowing but what she might founder as 
we went alongside. When we got on board 
we found, through her blowing off steam, 
that the boilers were short of water, and 
whilst we were getting ready, along came 
four trawlers and two destroyers, and took 
us in tow, but owing to the deadweight of the 
ship, being half foundered and with a heavy 
list, they pulled the forecastle away. Even- 
tually they got on each side of her, and got 
along until they were able to beach her at 
Gosport. Now we stayed by the ship until 
they patched her up with wood, and brought 
her up to the Tyne and dry-docked her, and 
for this we got our ordinary sea pay and a 
gratuity of seven pounds.' Now, sir, that 
is the man's statement, and T can assure you 
I can give you others where men have been 
torpedoed, and after reaching the shore have 
had to be sent home by charity. Here, there 
were men who saved a ship, 8000 tons bur- 
den, worth about £250,000, and get £7 for 
their services." 



SUPPRESSION OF PERIODICALS. 



Judge Charles M. HougJT, of the Federal 
Court of the Vermont District, in declin- 
ing to dismiss his order staying the in- 
junction obtained by "The Masses" against 
the Postoffice, commented on the reported 
intention of Mr. Burleson to deprive "The 
Masses" of its second-class mailing privi- 
lege. Mr. Burleson later carried out this 
intention, acting on the ground that "The 
Masses," its August issue having been de- 
nied the use of the mails by his own 
order, was not continuously issued. Judge 
Hough said : 

"That the Postmaster General intends 
(if he does so intend) to assign as a 
ground for such exclusion, plaintiff's failure 
to mail the August number of its period- 
ical, when he knows that he was himself 
the sole reason for such omission on 
l)Iaintiff's part, sounds like a poor joke. 
'Tis as if a policeman knocked a man 
down and then arrested him for encumber- 
ing the sidewalk." 



ALASKA REINDEER INDUSTRY. 



The year 1892 saw the beginning of a 
constructive and beneficial policy inaugu- 
rated by the Federal Government in Alaska, 
when the importation of reindeer began 
from Siberia to this Territory. This im- 
portation continued for 10 years, at the 
end of which time 1,200 had been brought 
over. From this nucleus the present Alaska 
reindeer service grew. The 1915 report 
shows a total of 70,243 reindeer distributed 
among 7(i herds. Of this number 46,683, 
or 66 per cent., are owned by 1,140 natives; 
3,408, or 5 per cent., are owned by the 
United States; 6,890, or 10 per cent, arc 
owned by the missions; and 13,262, or 19 
per cent., are owned by Laplanders and 
other whites. The total income of the 
natives from the reindeer industry for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1915, exclusive 
of meat and hides used by the natives 
themselves, was $81,997. The return on 
the investment in the reindeer service is 
shown by the folowing table : 

Valuation of 46,683 reindeer owned by 

natives in 1915, at $25 each $1,167,075 

Total income of natives from reindeer, 

1895 to 1915 369,407 

Valuation of 23,560 reindeer owned by- 
missions, Laplanders, other whites, 
and Government 589,000 

Total income of missions, Laplanders 
and other whites from reindeer, from 
1893 to 1915 107,361 

Total valuation and income 2,232,843 

Total Government appropriation, 1893 

to 1915 307,000 

Gain (627 per cent.) $1,925,843 

The distribution of the deer among the 
natives has been accomplished through a 
system of apprenticeship. According to 
the rules and regulations of the reindeer 
service, the term of apprenticeship is four 
years. At the end of the first year of his 
apprenticeship the native whose work is 
approved by the local superintendent re- 
ceives 6 reindeer ; at the end of the second 
year, 8 reindeer; at the end of the third 
year, 10 reindeer; and at the end of the 
fourth year, 12. With the approval of the 
local superintendent of the station, the 
apprentice may kill the surplus male deer 
and sell the meat for food and the skins 
for clothing. He is encouraged to use his 
sled-deer in carrying mails, passengers, and 
freight. Upon the satisfactory termination 
of his contract of apprenticeship an appren- 
tice becomes a herder and assumes charge 
of his herd, subject to the rules and reg- 
ulations of the reindeer service. The 
herder must then in turn train and reward 
apprentices in accordance with the provi- 
sions of the rules and regulations. ^ The 
system of distribution, therefore, continues 
automatically. The native is not allowed 
to sell female deer except to the Govern- 
ment or to another native. This policy is 
consistent with the purpose of the estab- 
lishment of the reindeer industry in 1892, 
namely, to provide for the economic wel- 
fare of the native inhabitants of Alaska.— 
From Governor's Report for 1916. 

The first woman's paper to be established 
in this country for the definite purpose of 
spreading abroad news of the new woman's 
rights propaganda was the Lily, a tmy 
four-page weekly sheet edited by Mrs. 
Amelia Bloomer of Seneca Falls, New 
York. This was begun in 1849, just the 
year after that famous first woman's rights 
convention called by Hli/.abeth Cady Stan- 
ton and a few other women, the radicals of 
those times. 



International Seamen^s Union 
of America 

(Continued from Pago 5.) 



LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWALTKEB, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

Headquarters: 

406 N. Clark Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 3637. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. T 19 Main Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 1-2 Ferry Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 47 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELANn. O 



Relief Stations: 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
I'lsranaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wla. 
lIouKhton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
M.Tnistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Martjuette. Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore 88'^ 3rd Street 

EUREKA, Cal 227 First Street, P. O. Box 64 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash... 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal... 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C.) Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C.) Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 10 East Street 

SACRAMENTO, Cal Labor Temple 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Women wearing overalls are em- 
ployed by the Hoquiam (Wash.) 
Sash and Door Company to break 
the eight-hour strike of men em- 
ployed at this plant. The women 
work ten hours for a lower wage 
than the men received. 

The report of the American steel 
foundries for the six months ended 
June 30th shows a profit of $3,948,- 
187, compared with $1,374,226 last 
year. As trade unionism would ma- 
terially affect these enormous profits, 
this corporation believes in "free and 
independent workmen." 

The twenty-fifth convention of the 
International Molders' Union was 
held in Rochester, N. Y., beginning 
September 10. In the election of 
delegates, Iron Molders' Union No. 
164, San Francisco, expressed its 
views on the conviction of Thomas 
J. Mooney, a fellow member, now 
under sentence of death. The union 
elected Mooney its delegate to the 
Iron Molders' convention. 

An increase in wages, averaging 
10 per cent, was put into effect in 
the California State printing office on 
the first of this month. This advance, 
states State Printer Robert Telfer, 
will affect all the employes from 
linotype operators to janitors. The 
present wage will run as follows: 
Printers, $.^.00; operators, $5.75 to 
$6.25; pressmen, $5.00; bookbinders, 
$5.00. The employes of the State 
Printing office are also allowed 
fifteen days annually on pay. 

Nearly 100 employes of the Nen- 
ralgylene Company of Wheeling, 
W. Va., have organized and sus- 
pended work to secure living wages. 
Rates, especially for women, are low, 
ranging from between $6 and $7.50 a 
week and $2.50 a day for male 
workers. The company manufactures 
"Cascarcts," "Neuralgylene," "Dan- 
derine," "California Syrup of Figs," 
etc. When the workers presented 
their new wage scale to President 
Behrens of the company that of- 
ficial said the matter could not be 
acted on until the general manager 
returned from his vacation. 

Baldwin-Feltz. detectives employed 
by the West Virginia Coal and Coke 
Company continue their terrorizing 
policy in Rraxton and Gilmer coun- 
ties. The West Virginia Fcdera- 
tionist says Governor Cornwell has 
the power to run the guards out of 
the State. "The Governor," says 
this paper, "has repeatedly told rep- 
resentatives of the miners that he 
wanted the 'special police deputies' 
to protect the workers as much as 
protect property. Why are they not 
called out to end the situation in 
Braxton and Gilmer, and why are 
not the Baldwin-Feltz gunmen not 
driven from the State?" 

The necessity for licensed engi- 
neers continually urged by the Steam 
Engineers' Union, is endorsed by 
city officials who have ordered a 
thorough inspecton of steam boilers 
in Philadelphia to insure safety dur- 
ing the winter months to persons 
attending moving picture theaters, 
occupants of apartment houses and 
to employes of industrial heated es- 
tablishments. Owners of buildings 
where low-pressure steam boilers 
are in use will be charged approxi- 
mately $5 for the inspection, and, 
unless the property ov*-ners comply 
with the requirements, the fire mar- 
shal has been instructed to withhold 
their certificates. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Offlca Phon* Elliott 11M 



EaUbllahed 1890 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methodt In Modern Navigation and Nautical Aatronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamahip Inapectora' Ofllca 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 FIrat Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

26 cents and up per Day 

Special Ratea Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORB, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wath., Letter LUt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 

PostotHce, letters addressed In car© of 

the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 

to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 

the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Alton, N. MoNirol, G. C. 

Anderson, H. -822 M.irlsen. .Johannus 

Andersen, .luUus McNeill, Ross 

Andersen. K. P. Mathesen, Nils 
Andersen, Frank H. MacLeod. John 

Andersen, W. McManigal, Thos. 

Andersen, Gust Mikkelsen. K. -1G20 

Anise. Johan Mostad, Leonard 

Andersen, .Tohn Mikkelsen. P. 

.Anderson, Martin Madsen, C. H. 

.Abrahamsen, W. Mathlosen. Jorger 

Berg. John Matson. Eric 

Beitelsen, B. McLaughlin. Dan 

Rensen, Helge Nelsen, N. P. 

Broundi, F. Nielsen. Even F. 

Buhman. H. Ness. L. 

Busch. H. Nilsen, N. 

Bywater, C. Nord. F. 

Bjurnson, J. Norton, Emil 

(package) Nyhagen. Julius 

Blomberg, Gust Nelson. M- -1330 

Benedict, Joe Nelson, John 

BergUn, G. H. Nielson, Christen 
Borvik, C. Eliasen Newman, John 

Cadogan, J. Newland. E. 

Carruthers, M. Naro, M. 
Chamberlain, L. C. Nilsen, J. G. 

Checkan, B. Nelsen, L. 

Connery. Matt Ohman. H. 

Corty. C. Olsen, C. Otto 

('arlson, Gus Olsen, Albert 

("Mravan, W. W. Olsen, Johan S. 

ChristofEersen, B. Olsen. Olsen 

Danielsen. O. J. Olsen. Carl 

Dehler, F. M. Olsen, Johan 

Droje, H. Olsen, Hjalmar Fr. 

Darrow, H. Olsen. Henry 

Drotningbaug. O. Olsen. J. H. 
Eliasen. H. O. -837 Ovvall, Johan 

Eliasen, John E. Olsen, B. -597 

Ekholm, Gus Olsen. A. M. 

Ettrup, Jens Olsson, Frank 

Eriksen, Alfred Olsson, C. M. -6824 

Eriksen, E. Olsen. Ole -1020 

Erikson, John Owens, J. H. 

Engebretsen, J. Petterson, Chr. 

Fogel, O. Petterson, O. N. 

Franzell, A. Pedersen, Carl 

Forrest, Wide Pederson, H. -1560 

Fnllbom. J. A. Perkins, Floyd 

Gabrielsen, Gust Powers, James 

Glace, G. Petersen, Hans L. 

Gronbeck. Theo. Paterson. P. 

Groth, Karl Plant, W. 

Gaupeseth, S. Rehnstrom. A. G. 

Gill. Harry Renberg, Ed. 

Gilbert, A. J. Roos, A. W. 

Grau, Axpsel Roos, B. 

Hanson, Andrew Rosenquist, G. 

Hansen, Marius Rasmussen. I/. 

Hansen, Ole Riscossa, John 

Hunter. G. H. Ron. Gus 

Hannelius, Ragnar Ruckmlck. Anton 

Hosset, C. Rosnes, C. B. 

Hammond. Chas. Russel, Arthur 

Hansen. L. -1314 Runstrum, Albert 

Henrtrlksen, John Renstrom, P. 

Holmes, C. A. Salonen. John 

Isaksen, A. W. Sandberg, John 

Isaksen, O. Slgvartsen, A. 

Jensen, H. P. A. Simonsen. A. S. 

Jypesen, Peter Smith, Emil 

Johnson, A. Stalzerman, Emil 

Johnson, Alex Svard. C. P. 

Johnson, J. -343 Svansen. Ben 

Johnson, Andrew Saunders, Oscar 

Jorgensen. Fredrik Schmidt, Emil -1520 

Julison, C. A. Seibert, Henry 

Jensen, Hans Slgvartsen, Arthur 

Jargenbeck, J. Sorensen, Carl 

Johanson, J. R. Stein, J. 

Johansen, Karl Strasdln, A. W. 

Johnson, Chas. Swansen. Axel 
Karlson, Gustaf A. Saxley. C. H. 
Karlson, Johan E. Slvertsen. Karl 

Lackey, C. Smith, G. -893 

Larsen, Nils Svard, C. P. 

Larsen, Emil Them, Arvid 

Larson, Lars Thai, Richard 

Larson, E. Tingburg, Axel 

Lausson, Jack Tergersen, A. N. 

Laursen. Nils Tiechert. G. 

Llndsfrom. T. Telkert, K. H. 

Lundberg, A. C. Valentinsen. G. 

Lauresen, Hans Venema, H. 

IJndwall. Richard Williams. T. C. 

Larsen. M. E. L. Walker. H. W. 

Lindecker. C. Walker. J. H. 

Larsen. Ejernd Woodley. Clifford 

(package) Wellbrook, Henry 

Larsen. C. -1516 Wlnstrom, Osoar 

Magi, John 'Woodbury, G. W. 

Marko, H. Wold, J. J. 

Mathlsen, Jorgen Zilenk, A. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIO STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and FIrat 

Store No. 2— Weatlaka and Pina 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY- WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Servlca 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Aaslstant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Ftimishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tocoma Letter LUt. 



Andersson. Alberto 
Carlstrand, G. 
Darbarog, Martin 
Hodson, H. I. 
Holmstrom. Carl A. 
Jacobson, Gustaf 
Kalberg, William 
Keinanen. Emil 
Magnusson, Ernest 

W. 
Martinsson, E. 
Marx. Thorvald 



Nelson. C. W. 
Nielsen, Niels -751 
Palken. G. 
Pearson. Fred 
Petterson, Hjalmar 
Pettersen, Charles 

-472 
Simonsen, Sam 
Stewart, Wm. H. 
Sueminen, Oscar 
Swansen, Carl 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Ualn SS9I 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The sailor on the "Quinault" who 
saw Edward Molloy, a fireman, fall 
into the hold of that vessel on the 
night of February 22 (Washington's 
Birthday) is urgently requested to 
communicate with Patrick Flynn. 
secretary Marine Firemen's Union, 
58 Commercial St. 7-11-17 

K. P. Andersen, No. 1717, is re- 
quested to communicate with J. Ed- 
wardson, agent Sailors' Union, Hono- 
lulu Branch, regarding his case 
against the bark "George Curtis." 



Eureka, CaL 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick servlca 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigara. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. . . Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron. Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sta., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTER 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING SHOES, HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL. CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 
Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables. Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON. Prop. 



SEATTLE, WASH., DEEP SEA 

FISHERMEN'S UNION 

LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, Jens 
Arneson. Peter 
Brennan. S. 
Burton, H. 
Berkey, Ole 
Backstrom. C. 
Christensen, John 
Collins. G. 
Condrad.=en, Julius 
Carroll. James 
Carravan. Walter 

Wm. 
Campbell. Daniely 
Degerstrom. Arthiir 
Palil. Alfred 
Dragland, F. O. 
Rhler. Goo, 
Kriksen, M.Tgne 
Rngdal. Isak 
Edvords. C. 
Ford. C. F. 
Fowler. ITenry 
FJellestad, Thomas 
Gnstafson. C. J. 
Giske. Lewis 
Grenkvist, Oscar 
Gorgensen. G. 
Greene. Ben 
ITowlett. James 
Hanson. .Tohn 
TIedlund, Pete 
Hansen. Gilbert 
Johnson. Ole 
.Toh.nnsen, .John 
Jolinsen. Olaf 
Kelly. Mike 
Kaalhelnsen. Alfred 
Ijarsen, Chas. 



Larsen, Olaf 
I^arson, Peder 
Larentzen, Harrold 
Lindkvist, Karl 
Morgan, William 
Moldver. A. 
Munroe, Wallace 
Nelson, Henry 
Nilson, N. A. 
Nilson, Adolf 
Nilson, Carl J. F. 
Ness, John 
Olsen, Oliver 
Olsen, Servin 
Osmundsen. Olaf 
Ongstad, P. J. 
Olsen. Garnett 
Petersen. Hans 
Pedersen. John A. 
Pedersen, Nils 
Petersen, V. 
Petersen, Julius 
Petersen. Lars 
Pedersen. J. R. 
Pedersen, Chas. O. 
Roes. Christ 
Sjosvold. Joe 
Shanahan, Benedict 
Swerdrup. Walter 
Sandberg. Oto 
Thompson, Alf. 
Thomasen. Peder 
Turner. Ruben 
Torkelsen. Fred A. 
Vaagen, Kristoffer 
Winter, Edvard 
White. A. 
Walters, G. P. 



Henoluln, H. T. 

Anderson, John E. Nelsen, C. P. 

Burk. Harry -1284 Petersen, Carl 

Crantly, C. W. Peters, Walter 

Eugenio, John Relther, Fritz 

Ekelund, RIckhard Solberg. B. P. 

Ivertsen, Sigvald B. Strand, Conrad 

Lengwenus, W. L. Thompson, Emil N. 
MOller, F. 



Q IV^ O K" F R ^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
O lYl V^ Pk IL, IV O ^^^ j^ ^jji^.^ yj,^ 3^^ served. 

Issued b/ AuUlOfil/o' the Cigar Makers International union of Amfnca 

Union-made Cigars. 

ylhi'i CtfilififS iw <M cigjjs cwtjioea imhis bo« M« fn mjM (y j Fiia-Qass WtSIb 

jMHieE«OriHtClC«IIMil<S'INI£R«lIIOIUlUNIOKot Amiiu. in orj«rua«» (tvolW Mlnjd- 
v«tia<nfnlo(IheM0i>AlMAUm»linai«imiCIU*l)«lU4R[0f IXttflATl. Tlnitfon 




MM Ctgati to all smoher^ U)roua^out tn» mwU 
IriAQiiatnu upon this LiMlMtlTbe pumsh«d iccwd^toUtf. 







COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Albertsen, Peter 
Anderson, Gotfrid 
Anderson, Gust H 
Andersen, Nils 
Benson, S. 
Brandt, Arvld 
Bohm, Franz 
Bartells, Otto 
Connel, Davir Mc 

Chrlstensen, Jo- 
hannes 

Carlera, Peter 

Elliot, Austin E. 

Fisher, Fritz 

Gulldersen, E. 

Gregory, W. 

Geiger, Joe 

Harding, Ellis 

Johansson, Charles 
-2407 

Johnson, Karl 

Jensen, H. T. 



Kristensen, Wm. 
Kroon, Al. 
Kelly, Wm. 
Knofsky, E. W. 
Larsen, Hans 
Mitchel, J. W. 
Nelson, A. S. 
Olson, David 
Ogllve, Wm. A. 
Paulson, Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Paul, George 
Rensmand, Robert 
Plasmussen, O. 
Saunders, Chas. 
Swanson, John L. 
Tuhkanen, Johan .T. 
Westengren, C. W. 
Wagner, W. M. 
Wellinger, L. 
Warren, Geo. 
Willing. Wm. 




Named sho«s are frequently mad* in 

Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, imless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 

are always Non-Union- 
Do not accept any excuse for absence 

of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers* Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec-Trsas. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



Whan In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts. 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
804 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hail 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS', 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDET80N 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



^1 Union Label of the 

I UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
softorstifif.see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are 
counterfeits. 

JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 




Home New» 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Ander.son, Chri.s. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andeson, A. P. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Tlprdwinen. Bob 
Uleasing, W. 
Bohm, Gust 



.Tohnsen, Carl 
.lohnson, Hans 
.Johnson, Hilmar 
Kessa, Theo. 
Kord, Hjalmar 
Kreander, Wiotor 
Kuldsen, John 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Rrowen, Alexander Ligoslci, Joe 

Brogard. N. Lohtonen, Arthur 

T'.run, Mattia Longien, Charley 

Brant, Max Malltoff, Peter 

Carlson, Adolph M. Meiners, Herman 

Crentz, F. Meyers, George 

Christensen, Hans Nelson, Aug. 

Christensen, Ditrich Newman, I. 

Christensen, Louis Nielsen, Alf. W. 



Phone 263 


"Ole and Charley" 


"The Royal" 
"The Sailors Rest" 


Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Arthur William Thompson, who 
left Port Pirie, on the ship "Hocke" 
fifteen years ago, is inquired for by 
his brother, E. R. Thompson, Port 
Pirie West, South Australia. 11-22-16 



lAn International Journal 
^Fundamental Democracy 




A clever man said that when 
people speak of "habits" they re- 
fer to had habits only. As a mat- 
ter of fact habits are both good 
and bad. Personal progress is 
largely a matter of good habits. 
Reading "The Public" is a habit 
which thousands of alert minds 
practice. Why not cultivate this 
invigorating habit yourself? 

Referpnces! Lincoln Stoffens, 
Brand Whitlock, Judge Ben B. 
Lindsay, Ray Stannard Baker, 
and you — after you have tried it. 

Introductory OflTer: Three 
booklets on the Singletax and 10 
Issues of "The Public" only 25c. 

The Public ' 

122 tiSSt 37th Street N. Y. City 



Davis, Frank A. 
Donaldson. Harry 
I<jl<man, Gust 
lOllingsen, Erling 
Kliassen, John A. 
I'"attinger. August 
Fislier, Charley 
Frohne, Robert 
Gerard, Albert 
Gold, Herman 
Graf, Otto 
Grant, August 
Gray, William 
Gran. Aksel 
Gronlund, Oskar 
Gronros, Oswald 

-414 
Gueno, Pite 
Gran, Axel 
Grag, William 
Hansen, Thorleif 
Hansen, .Tack 



Nielsen, C. 
Niisen, Harry 
Olsen, Alf. 
Olsson, C. 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Peterson, Nels 
Pettersen, Carl 
Ralill, J. 
Risenius, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Sandquist, Gunnar 
Semith, Ed. 
Schenk, Albert 
Shemwall. Sigurd 
Sckultz, Bernt. 
Teuber, Rolf. 
Thorn. Alek. 
Thornland, John 
Torin, Gustaf A. 
Waales, Edgar 
Wagner, Ed. 
Wedequist, Axel 



ITansen, Max Owe Williams, T. C. 

Harley, Alex Williams, John 

High, Edward Wolf, R. G. 

Hoimroos, Alin Zoerb. W. 

Hedrick, Jack Packages. 

Jensen, L. Billings. George 

Johansson, Arvo Eilingsen, Erling 

Johanssen, John F. 



Alaska Fishermen 

San Francisco. 



Arentsen, John 
Broman. Emil 
Campbell, Martin 
Ericson, Otto 



Osberg, Ansgar 
Pedersen, Aagnvald 
Petterson, Conrad 
Thorsen, Andrew 



Hokansson, Ingvar Tamisor, Peter 
Johansen, Henry Werner, C. J. 



REGISTRATION CARDS AT 

SAILORS' UNION OFFICE, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Members whose names appear in 
this column, should call for their 
ard at once: 
.\l)0ling, Mattiss Moulas, Nick 

I'.Jorklund, T. E. G.Mullen, Harry P. 



Baerner, P. F. 
Carlson, Carl 
Danielsen, L. M. 
Dablin, Harry 
Fischer, P. A. E. 
Geisendorfer, Emil 
Gregg, Oliver 
Gustafsson, T. S. 
Hansen, R. F. 



Nelson, Axel 
Neumann, .Tolm 
Nielsen, Walimar 
Narton, Karl 
Olsen, Olal 
Ozezerski, Paul 
I'aavilainen, A. 
Patterson, John S. 
Quiroga. Juan 



Hohensang, Max G. Rinne. Hjalmar 
Flolmgren, Reinhold Sclmeider, H. F. T. 



Hunonen, Cust 
Jacobson, Joakim 
Jensen, Lorents 
Johannsen. A. 
Joyce, William 
Meek, Ole J. 
Merkel. George 
Mlckelson. Julius 
Moss, A. W. 



Schramm, Albert 
Svendsen, Henry 
Treho, George 
Vinx, Honry 
Wail, Alfred 
Wclir. Fred 
Westorik, Ingalf 
Wezwager, Andrew 
Wilhelmson, Carl 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
.Seamen's Journal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The following named seamen, who 
have been marked as deserters from 
their respective ships, have had their 
wages turned over to the U. S. Ship- 
ping Commissioner, and now in the 
U. S. District Court, at Norfolk, 
Va., are requested to communicate 
with the agent of the Eastern and 
Gulf Sailors' Association, 54 Com- 
mercial Place, Norfolk, Va. : 

Andrew Jacobson, Amer. str. "Bay 
View," Mar. 1/10 $10.00 

Hans Tapperson, Amer. str. "Bay 
State," Aug. 2/10 13.48 

A. Petersen, Amer. str. "Healton," 

Oct. 7/16 :. 10.00 

John Sanchez, Amer. str. "Jonan- 
cy," Apr. 8/16 18.67 

Charles Austin, Amer. str. "Flor- 
ida," Apr. 8/16 11.67 

W. Koff, Amer. str. "Ancon," Nov. 
30/15 13.00 

O. Westgood, Amer. str. "Ancon," 
Nov. 30/15 15.00 

James Wilkinson, bark "Edw. Sew- 
ell," June 28/15 27.57 

F. Osborne, bark "Edw. Sewell," 
June 28/15 17 67 

Emil Hoffman, bark "Edw. Sew- 
ell," June 28/15 18.07 

C. Karlson, bark "Edw. Sewell," 
June 28/15 15.67 

J. Morris, bark "Edw. Sewell," 
June 28/15 12.33 

Chas. Strauser, Amer. str. "Rich- 
mond." May 21/15 18.06 

James Taylor, Amer. str. "Missou- 
rian," May 21/15 12. 80 

Pat Ryan, Amer. str. "Ulysses," 
Sept. 11/15 :. 11.00 

F. Abramhanson. Amer. str. "Ulys- 
ses," Oct. 2/15 25.00 

James Carroll, Amer. str. "Jacob 
Luckenbach," Apr. 23/13 20.00 

W. R. Hogland, Amer. str. "Ne- 
braskan," Aug. 3/16 57.90 

H. Parker, Amer. str. "Nebras- 
kan," Aug. 3/16 63.77 

W. Koffman, Amer. str. "Nebras- 

kan," Aug. 3/16 45.96 

(Six suit cases) 

Gus Schoenning, tug "Richmond," 
Aug. 27/10 25.83 



NOTICE. 

The following list of salvage cases 
are now in the office of S. B. Axtell, 
attorney, 1 Broadway, New York. 
Members of the crews of the herein 
named vessels who have not received 
their share of salvage will please 
write to the above address: "Fram- 
field vs. "Wayfarer" — "Wayfarer" 
was towed into Qucenstown, 1916; 
"Grason" vs. "Lowthcr Grange" — 
Latter vessel towed in November, 
1916, to British port; "Fleetwing" vs. 
"Melazo"— Fire, October 16, 1916, 
services rendered by "Fleetwing"; 
"Majoren" vs. "Voss"— Eight days 
towing to the "Voss," March, 1916, 
good claim; "Siljestad" vs. "Mar 
Caspio" — Services rendered December 
10, 1916, towed into Fayal; "Ashtab- 
ula" (Standard Oil Co.) vs. "San 
Onofrc"— "San Onofre" towed into 
Halifax, March 18, 1916; "Moorish 
Prince" vs. "Indo Maru"— September, 
1916; "John A. Hooper" vs. "Bar- 
ranca"— January, 1916; "New York" 
vs. Barge "Colonel Moore"— Novem- 
ber 21st, towed to Southwest Pass; 
"Brindilla" vs. 'Emilia"— Towed to 
Florida, 1916. 4-11-17 



In accordance with a ruling of the 
Food Administration, issued on Au- 
gust 16, all processes in the produc- 
tion of distilled spirits for beverage 
purposes must cease at 11 o'clock 
P. M., September 8. 

As a war emergency measure the 
National Forest ranges are carrying 
this summer approximately 100,000 
more cattle and 200,000 more sheep 
than in ordinary years, according to 
the grazing experts of the Forest 
Service. Ordinarily the National 
Forests furnish pasturage for about 
1,800,000 cattle and horses and 7,800,- 
000 head of sheep. 

James E. Ferguson was suspended 
from the office of Governor of Texas 
when the hoard of nine managers 
named by the House of Representa- 
tives presented to the Senate 21 ar- 
ticles of impeachment alleging offi- 
cial misconduct. W. P. Hobby, 
L i e u t e nant-Governor, automatically 
succeeded to the governorship, pend- 
ing disposition of the charges in 
the Senate. 

All records for iron ore production 
in the United States were broken 
in 1916, when the output reached a 
total of 75,167,672 gross tons, valued 
at approximately $180,000,000, accord- 
ing to figures issued by the Federal 
Geological Survey. This was an in- 
crease of 19,600,000 gross tons and 
of 40 per cent, in value over 1915. 
Minnesota, Michigan and Alabama, as 
usual, were the greatest producers. 

Low wages of fathers and employ- 
ment of mothers away from home 
accompany an excessive death rate 
among babies in Manchester, N. H., 
according to a recent report of the 
Children's Bureau of the Department 
of Labor. The greatest death rate 
was among babies whose fathers re- 
ceived the lowest rate of wages, be- 
ing four times as high as among 
babies whose fathers received the 
highest wages. 

The railroads' war hoard, a sub- 
committee of the Council of National 
Defense, announces that the freight 
car shortage has been reduced to 
33,776 cars, or one-fourth of what it 
was on May 1. It is stated that 
this result has been accomplished by 
organization at a time when the rail- 
roads are supplying from 15 to 20 
per cent, more freight service with 
the same number of cars than was 
being given this time last year. 

Food Director Hoover estimates 
the grain shortage of the world at 
400,000,000 bushels. America's con- 
tribution toward making up the 
shortage will consist in raising our 
exports of wheat from 88,000,000 to 
220,000,000 bushels. This can be 
(lone, Mr. Hoover says, if we will 
reduce our consumption of wheat 
flour from five pounds per week to 
four pounds per week per person, 
using other grains in place of the 
wheat. 

Dr. Anna Howard Shaw, who has 
worked long and earnestly for the 
suffrage cause, says that 90 per cent. 
f)f the sufTrapisls of the United 
Slates deplore the White House 
picketing, but she adds thai the 
misguided women disuplay a lack of 
reasoning which is far exceeded by 
that of "the men, either within or 
without Congress, who hide behind 
the pickets and their purple banner.s 
and seek to make the conduct of a 
few women an excuse for their own 
failure to vote for the political free- 
dom of millions of loyal, patriotic, 
;m(l law-abiding women of the Uni- 
ted States." 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The new schooner "Charles H. 
MacDowell" has been launched from 
the yard of G. S. Baxter & Co., 
Jacksonville, Fla. She has been sold 
to Armour & Co. 

The five-masted sailing vessel "City 
of Houston," just completed at a 
shipyard at Orange, Tex., at a cost 
of $400,000, was destroyed by a sus- 
picious fire on August 6. The vessel 
was launched April 26 and was to 
have sailed for Mobile in a few days 
to load for Italy. She was of 3600 
tons gross. 

The Mississippi Shipbuilding Com- 
pany has taken a lease on the John- 
son property in Biloxi and within 
the next several weeks will begin the 
erection of a large plant. Six large 
2000-ton schooners will be built im- 
mediately after the plant is erected, 
employing a large number of men. 
Men are at work on the grounds 
nov^' erecting an office building. 

Eleven persons were drowned and 
a child died from exposure in Lake 
Ontario when the coal schooner 
"George A. Marsh," of Belleville, 
Ont., foundered in a heavy gale on 
the voyage from Oswego to King- 
ston. The dead include Capt. Smith, 
his wife and five children; William 
Watkins, mate; George Cousins and 
Mr. and Mrs. McClennen and a 
child. One man and a boy were 
rescued. 

Over 100 tons of mussels were 
removed from the bottom of the 
seized German steamer "Koln" in the 
drydock at East Boston. The vast 
accumulation of sea growth and mus- 
sels on the vessel's bottom was the 
result of her stay of over three years 
in Boston Harbor without being 
cleaned. While in the drydock the 
propeller was removed and the shaft 
drawn and inspected. It was found 
to be in good condition. 

A comparison of the coastwise ar- 
rivals at Boston for the first seven 
months of the present year with the 
same period of 1916 shows a falling 
off of 651 vessels and 896,706 gross 
tons. This shrinkage is due entirely 
to the war, many of the largest sail- 
ing vessels formerly in the coastwise 
coal trade having been sold on for- 
eign account, while numerous steam- 
ers which used to be engaged in the 
same business have gone into the 
offshore trade. 

Contracts for the construction of 
twenty-six merchant vessels, repre- 
senting an expenditure by the Gov- 
ernment of thirteen million dollars, 
are now in the hands of Mobile 
shipbuilding corporations, according 
to Warren Johnson, district officer 
for the Emergency Fleet Corporation 
of the U. S. Shipping Board. Mr. 
Johnson stated that each of the ships 
was to be built at a cost of a half 
million dollars, exclusive of labor, 
which will total between $150,000 and 
$200,000 on each of the ships. 

The five-mast schooner "Martha P. 
Small," 1903 tons reg., built at Bath, 
Me., in 1901; five-mast schooner 
"Cora F. Cressy," 2089 tons reg., 
built at Bath, Me., in 1902, and 
four-mast schooner "Camilla May 
Page," 567 tons reg., built at Bath, 
Me., in 1905, are reported sold to 
New York owners on French Gov- 
ernment account. The "Martha P. 
Small" and "Cora F. Cressy," owned 
by Percy & Small, Bath, Me., real- 
ized $180,000 and $202,500, respect- 
ively. For the "Camilla May Page," 
owned by J. S. Winslow & Co., 
Portland, Me., $100,000 was paid. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

IV1ISS10N BRANCH, S. E. Corner IVlission and 21st Streets 

RICHIV10ND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Cor. Haiglit and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1917 
Assets ..--.-. 
Deposits ....... 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ... 

Employees' Pension Fund ..... 

Number of Depositors ..... 



$64,566,290.79 

61,381,120.63 

2,185,170.16 

259,642.88 

65,717 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Leiit-rs at the San Francisco Sailors' 
rnion Otflcc are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 



Post Office at the expiration of four [ Hermansson, C. P. Horton, Bert 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aanensen, Amen Andersen, K. P. 

-Vagaard, A. M. Andersen. Martin 

Abiding, Matias Andersen, Nils 

Abrahamsen, A. E. Andersen. O. -1118 

Abrahamson, Alfred Anderson, C. A. 

Abrahamson, WernerAnderson, Frank 
Alilquist, Kvert J. -332 

Adain.son, Johan Anderson, Fred 

1144 Anderson, L. -1854 



Ahokas, Ilmari 
.\lbers, Geo. 
Albert, J. C. 



Anderson, Jonny 
Anderson, Nils 
Anderson, P. 



Albertsen, Peter S. Anderson, Wilford 



Albrecht. Chas. 
Allen, James 
Allen, W. A. 
Alto, Johan -1349 
Altonen, Karl 
Anderinod, Pletro 
Andersen, Carl 
Amundsen, Oscar 
Andersen, Emil 
Andersen, H. -1526 

Baach, A. 

Baak, M. 

Baker. C. 

Handel. Kurt 

Barry. William J. 

Behrendt, Paul 

Beint, R. J. 

Benson. Helge A. 

Berggren, Oscar 

Hergstrom. Axei 

Bergstrom, Paavo 

Berk, E. W. 

Bernhard. Thorsten Bryning, Walter 

Bertelson, Oskar Buck, August 

-2184 Buhler, Karl 

Bertiielsen, Charles Buntie, Paul 
Beselin. Ed. Burgess, Robert 

Biederstedt, Fritz Bushman, John 



Andersson, A. -1060 
Anshmit, Martin 
Antonsson, G. -2077 
Apple, August 
Askloe, Knut A. 
Asmu.ssen, Wage 
Aspe. T. 
Auzin, A. -363 
Aylward, James 

Blomgren, M. A. 
Blom, John A. 
Blumberg, Gustave 
Borg, Anthony 
Borgwardt, Kurt 
Boswell, J. W. 
Bower, Gosta 
Breien, Hans 
Brennan. P. 
Brott, Walfrid 
Brown, C. H. 
Bryant. William 



Billings, George 
Bindberg, Oscar 
Bindling, O. -2291 

Campbell. Martin 
Camfiel, W. H. 
Carey, Arthur 
Carlsen, Pete 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlson, Ed. 
Carlson, Gust 
Carlson, Kenning 



Bye, Oscar M. 
Byers, A. 
Byglln, Oiva O. 

Cash in, Jolin Ben 
Casslmos, C. 
Cederlof, Knut 
Christensen, Alfred 
Christensen, Oscar 
Christianson, Sam 
Christoffersen, G. 
Clausen, Christian 



Carlson, Victor -576 Clipper. Mike 
CailBson, S. -1474 Comstedt, Oscar 
Carmeli, G. Cooistra. Sam 

Carr. W. D. Crawford, — 

Carsten, Alfred 

Dahlgren, W. A. Diamus, W. 

Danielsen, Louis M. Dinkeren, John 

IJanlelson. J. 

Davey, Chas. 

Decoe, Eugene 

Degroot, George 

Dehler. A. M. 

Deswert, Robert 

Dettloff, W. C. 

Deur. Henry 

Dexter, Arthur 

Eaton, Isaac N. 
Eck, Chas. 
Edlund. Konrad 
Edmann, O. -557 
Ekholm, Frank 
Eklund, Gus. 
Ekstrom, George 
Ellerman. T 
Ellingsen, Eling 



Doering, Julius 
Dracar, E. 
Dukatz, H. 
Dumas. C. 
Dunkel, Charley 
Dunn, Walter 
Dutra, Anthony 
Dybdai, Olaf 

Ellingsen, Eriing 
Elward. Jim 
Emkoft, Otto 
Ertman, Eskil 
Espedal, Jolin 
Evan, Stanley 
Evensen, Andrew 
Evensen. TxjuIb 
Evenson, E. V. 



Fahnke, Paul 

Farcum, Andrew 

Farrell, Bernard 

Farrell, Harry 

Fereire, Jos. 

Fesch. W. 

Fergerson. Thomas Krick, H. C. 

Flnck, John 



Forsberg, Sven 
Fredholm, Chas. J. 
Fredriksen, Birgier 
Fredrickson, Martin 
Freiberg. Peter 
Fricke. Wm. 



Gallenburg, M. 
Garden. Crist 
Gardener, Ed. 
Gasch, Wm. 
Gasman. Georee 
Gonarshang, G. 
Gent, Adam C. 
Gerard, Albert 
Gerber, Leland K. 
Gibbson. Chas. 
Grabower, Martin 



Gray. Hamilton 
Green, J. 
Gregg, R. O. 
Gregory, Antonio 
Grelr. A. 
Gulliksen, G. M. 
Gunder.son. George 
Gundersen, Kristian 
Gunder.son, John 
Gunther. Ted 
Gustafson. Chas. 



Granstrom. Nestor Gustafsson, Valter 
Grantz, John 

Hackensmith, R. C. Hansen. K. -2292 



ITagberg. Gust. 
Hagen, Georg 
Hahne. Wilhelm B. 
Halbeck, Oscar 
Hale. Kinglev 
Halvorsen, Olaf 
Hondriksen. John 
Handlon. Paul E. 
Hannus, Alex 
Hannus, Mike 
Hannus. P. 
Hansen, A. -2542 
Hansen, Axel A. 
Hansen, E. -2R.11 
Hansen, Fredrick 
Hansen, J. -2166 
Hansen, John 



Hansen, M. -SfiS 
Hansen, Nikolay 
Hansen, Pagaard 
Hansen, W. C. H. 
Hanson, Charley 
Hanson, E. 
Hanson, Rudolph 

-927 
Haraldsen, Alf 
Halt, R. Karl 
Harrington, Michael 
Hartog, J. 
Harburg, Walter 
Hedlund. O. 
Hecg, Birger 
Hein, M. 
Heinonen, Kusta 



Heis. J. S. 
Hellsten, Axel 
Hendersen, H. 
Henke, Ernest 
Jlenkelnian, H. J. 
llenriksen, Harald 
Herman, David 



Hering, Alfred 
Hoff, Axei 
Higgins, H. 

Isaacson, J. 
Isackson, Karl 

Jacobs, August 
Jacobsen, Chas. 
Jacobson, Edward 
Jacobson, Emil 
Jaiobson, Joakim 
Jakobsen, M. 
Jakoske, Paul 
Janson, Brandrop 
Jarzombeck, J. 
Jensen, Erns 
Jensen, Henry 



Hoiberg, Olut 
Ilohensang, George 
Holm, C. 
Holm, O. 
Holmstrom, Hjal- 

mar 
Hopp, Carl 



Hubert, Harry 
Hull, H. 
Hunter, G. H. 

Isberg. Wlcktar 
Ivertsen, Slgvald B. 

Johansen, Louis 
Johansson, Bernard 
Johansson. E. A. 
Johnsen, Norman 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, Frank 
Johnson, G. M. 
Johnson, John H. 
Johnson. Walter 
Johnsson, C. J. 
Jonsen, Konrad 



Jeppesen, Christian Jonsson, P. W. 



Johannesen, J. 

-1441 
Johansen, Gunner 
Johansen, H. V. 
Johansen, Ole 
Joliansen, T. A. 

Kaasik, August 
Kallas, A. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
ICaliiin, J. 
Karslen. Hugo B. 
Kaskinen, Kalle 
Katz, Fred. 
Ki-ppel. Job. 
Kerr, Will 
Kilgour, Jack 
Kline. Walter C 
Klinteberg, Stenof 
Knitzer, A. 
Knoppe, Wm. 

Laine, Frank L. 

Larsen, C. A. M. 

Lamer, Oscar 

Lampe, Fred 

Larsen, Hakon 

Larsen, Hans 

Larsen, John 

Larsen, Peter 

Larsen, Rogner 

Larson, Axel 

L-irson, Carl 

Larsson, Adolf 

Larsson, Alfred R. 

i.,ast. Paul 

Laursen, Niels 

Leamey, W. 

Lehtonen, J. O. 

Leidecker, EL 

Leitlioff, Charles 

Lfctchford, Ale.xanderLundquiat, C. A. 



Jordan, O. 
Jorgensen, Carl W. 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 

-2074 
Jorgensen, Rasmus 
Joyce, W. 

Knudsen, Carl 
Knute, A. 
Koferd, George 
Ivornelius. Martin 
Krause, Frank 
Krishjau, K. 
Kristensen, K. D. 
Kristiansen, Jakob 
Kroft, Harry 
Kroon, R. W. -1142 
Kuhn, John 
Kuliborn. O. 
Kurki, Emil 
Kvalvlk. — 

Lindroos, A. W. 
Lindberg, Wm. 
Livendahl, Gus 
Loberg, B. N. 
Lofgren, Richard 
Lohue, Evan 
Loland. Louis 
Lonugoen, Carl W. 
Lorensen. Nick 
Lorln. Christian 
Lovgren, Otto 
Lowland, L. 
Luckner, A. 
Lundeen, Eric F. 
Lund, Christoffer 
I^und, Erie E. 
Lunderwold, F. 
Lundmark, Helge 
Lundqulst, Axel 



Palii. G. 

Faulsson, Herman 
Pearson, Sigfrid 

Pedersen, Chas. 

I'edersen, George 

Pedersen, Louis 

Pederson, R. S. 



Peterson. C. -1493 
Peterson. Robert L. 
Petter, G. 

Peterson, Viktor 
Pettersson, Eugen 
Pettersson. Konrad 
Petterson, Oskar 



Pennanen, Leopold Petrow, A. 



V. 

Person. N. P. 
Pestoit, S. 
Petersen, A. -1551 
Petersen, Chris 
Petersen, Oiav 



Pihistrom, Ragnar 
Phllman. George 
Pope, H. -1464 
Porter, Henry 
Pottage, Chas. E. 
Poulsen, Emil 



Petersen, Walter Poysky, Jahlmar 



G 
Petersen 



Wilhelm 



Funis, Anton 
Pusner. W. T. 

Rohde. Fritz 
Rollo, R. 
Rommerdahl, A. 
Ronger, Henry 
Rosenblad, E. A. 
Ross, W. A. 
Rou. Gustav 
Ruekmieh, Anton 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Ryan, Patrick 
Rytko, Otto 



Ranistad, Andreas 
Rand, J. 
Rapson, E. 
Kasanen, Yrjo 
Hasmussen, Axel 
Rasmussen, Jacob 
Rector. T. 
Reen, R. A. 
Reinke, Herman 
Rehs, Paul 
Reith. K. C. R. 
Riiwe, Karl 

Saalmann, Jooseph Sigwartsen, Arthur 
Sahlberg, Waldemar SImonsen, Sigvard 
Sahlin. Nils Skotvik, Ole M. 

Salminen. Karl W. Smedsvlg. Oluf B. 



Sander, Otto 
.Sunder, Robert 
Sanne, Rudolph 
Sassi, Wilhelm 
Saunders, Chas. 
Savage, Roland 
Schamm, Charles 
sichikore. Otto 
Sehlrman, Konrad 
Schmidt, B 
Schmitt, Hans 
Schooten, G. J. 
Schroder, Paul 
Schroder, Willy 
Schultz. Albert 
Schwendt, Walde. 

mar 
Seiffert, .Johannes 
Sleffert, Leonhard 
Seike, C. 
Seike. Paul 
Semon, Joseph 
Tamison, Peter 
Tamisar, Peter 
Tamanen, Erland 
Tanum, Helge 



Smith. Edward F. 
Smith, Geo. W. 
Smith. John 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Samuel C. 
Spencer, Harry 
Spets, Karl 
Sprogae, Theo. 
Stauftt, Roy 
-1670 St. Clair. Chris. 
Sterenson, A. 
Stennesen, Harald 
Stenroos. Frans 
Stohr, Erich 
Stoltzerman. E. 
Strandberg, Olaf 
Svensson, W. -2591 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Swanson, B. 
Swanson, J. -1013 
Swenson, L. V. 

Thompson, Olie 
Thorsen. Hans K. 
Thorsen. Herman 
Thorsen, Tor. 



Lidsten, Charles 
Linder. V. 
Lindblom, Edw. 
Maas. Joseph P. 
Macchi, Willy 
Mackey, Harry 
Madsen, Ludvip 
Magnuson, Carl 



Lunstedt, Chris. 
Lyngaard, Jorgen 

McKeon, Thos. 
McManus. P. 
McNeill, Ross 
Meinjohanns, C. 
Meiander, G. L. 



Magnusson, Sigurd Melgand, R. 



Maki, Ivar 
Malmin, T. 
Malmstrom, E. 
Manifold, Joseph 
Mardson, A. 
Marckwardt. Carl 
Markman, Harry 
Martinesen, L. 



Melgand, Richard 
Michaelsen, John 
Mikkelsen, C. P. 
Mlkkelsen, Jack 
Miller. R. E. 
Mertheus, H. 
Mohr, Charles 
Monsen. Birger 



Martin, J. F. -2604 Monteiro, Joe 



Martin, Jos 
Martinson, Ere 
Matheson, Alex 
Matson, Alick 
McCarthy, P. J. 

-2210 
McDermot, William Myrhoi, J 
McGilllvray, F. B. D. 



Moore, Maclyn 
Moore, M. H. 
Morris, O. R. 
Mortensen, I. I 

-2191 
Moypl. W. 



Tonnesen, Andreas Tingberg, Axel 

Tham, Alec Tjersland, Sverre 

Thee, Rudolph Tompson, Fritz 

Thomas. Henry Tomsen. Harrv 

Tliomscn, Peder Tellefsen, N. Emil 
Thompson, BenjamlnTorrance, John 

Thompson, G. E. Trovlck. Harold 

Thompson, G. F. Tweedale, D. S. 
Tliompson, John 

Ultman. Th. 

Valarias, L. 
Valkanen, Veda 
Vallianos, Splros 
V'annkvist, Ernst 
Vejooda, F. 

Wall, Alfred 

Wallin. Berger 

Walter, John 

Wank, Roman 

Ward, Jack 

Wasserloos, Rudolf Wilson, C. J. 

Weiss. Vaidemar Wlrkkl, Reinhold 

Wezwagar, Andrew Wlssmann, F. W. 

Westvik, I. 

Zarb, Walter J. Zlrnbauer, Chas. 

Ziehr, Ernst Zunk, Bruno 

PACKAGES. 



Uppit, Walter 

Verney, A. 
VIckery. Curtis 
Von Dyke. Harry 
Vriki, Silas 



Wiik, Frank 
Wilier, Carl P. 
Whiteside, Fred. 
Wicklund, Wictor 
Williams. Charlie 



Andersen, Andov 
Backm.in, — 
Berling, J. B. 
Carlson, John 
Dettloff, W. C. F 
Grenne, O. H. 



Lawberg, A. W. 
Murray, Con. P. 
Myers. W. 
Neumann, H. J. 
Olsen, H. C. 
Olsen, R. B. 



Gunvaldsen, Ingvald Oslund, O 

Heidenburg, Gus Olsson. C. G. - 

Jacobsen, Alfred Philips, J W. 

Jansson, A. L. Sahlin. Nils 

Jensen, Hans Sander, Otto 

Johansson, Werner Smedsvik, O. R. 

Larsen, C. A. Straiten. H. B. 

Larsen, Ed. Thorsen, Thor. 
Laurlsen, Niels 



1101 



Nelsen. C. -936 

Nelsen, Olaf 

Nelson, A. 

Nelson, Adolph H. 

Nelson, Harry 

Nelson. Karl C. 
Niejahr, Oskar 



Nilsson, F. H. 
Noble, Fred 
Nolan, James 
Nolen, Axel 
Nopo, — 
Norberg, J. A. 
Nordling. Sven 



Nielsen, E. S. -1116Norris. Norman A 
Nielsen, llarald J. Nurminen, John G. 



NIelson. S. 
Nillson, Josef 

Ohlsson, E. W. 
Ojeda, Leonardo 
O'Leary, John 
Olesen, Chr. 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, Amund 
Olsen, Anskar 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, C. M. 
Olsen, E. F. -1280 
Olsen, F. -1249 
Olsen, Fred 
Olsen, Harry -885 
Olsen, John 



Nurken, H. 
Nurm, John 

Olson, Morten 
Olsen, Nick 
Olsen, Oswald 
Olsen, Peder 
Olsen. R. B 
Olson, Gus. F. 
Olsson, A. W. 
Olsson, Ivar H. 
Olsson, J. 
Olsson, Vaidemar 
Orcesausky, Leo 
Osolix, Oskar 
Osten, William L. 
Osterhoff, H. 
Overgaard. Peter 



INVESTIGATE Cll|e|p = 

= ;;Tl)f?in<.|e Tit Whjl Ills.' H^nruGeorge ""'WLU- 
^ "The Sini;lc Tix and liie Farmer." Sffarman T t V " 
— 'The Single Tax and(he6us!Des«irail."y\u26i/ I A A "' 
2 All three booklels and Ihe Pullit, the paper n #i - 

— with Ihe Siasle Tax point of view, 1 weeks 25c. Z 

E THE PUBUC, 122 East 37th Street, New York S 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Phone Douglas 4290 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

BANKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 

Rooms 448-450, Fourth Floor 

Two Entrances: 

742 Market Street 49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourtli and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 
400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6348 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's OQ Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



HOTEL MELBA 

Connected with Falstaff Restaurant 

UP-TO-DATE FURNISHED ROOMS BY 

THE DAY, WEEK OR MONTH 

Rooms, 25c to $1.00 per Night 

$1.50 to $3.50 per Week 

Hot and Cold Water in Each Room 

Free Bath 

Phone Kearny 5044 214 JACKSON ST. 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Offlce Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN!! 



Owing to the Destruction by Fire of the 
Building he Formerly Occupied 

Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

Will Move into New and Permanent Quarters 
in the Southern Pacific Building 

STEUART AND MARKET STREETS 

About September 1 5 th 



ENTIRE NEW STOCK 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



^n ^m^^mk^ ^ 



\ 
*Ale 

AND 

Porter 

. It ■ejgs 

^S>o Of America r-Qxr* 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



Union 

NADE 

Beer 




THIS IS OUK LAi.,iii. 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources . .$7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Glnty 

S. Blssinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozlo Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 
SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 
Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Onlv. 
103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 2518 

HULTEN a RUDOLPH 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Williams 



UNION TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



PACIFIC NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Study for your license with a practical Shipmaster and 
Up-to-Date Navigator 

Pupils studying with me will receive personal attention 

CAPTAIN A. B. SOWDEN, 

Rooms 340-41 Montgomery Block 
Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets San Francisco 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 



SUITS TO ORDER, 
$30.00 TO $50.00 

Union Made 
in Our Own Shop 




Weekly Wages 
No Piece Work 



Eight-Hour Work Day 




JACOB PETERSEN ft SON 

Proprietor* 
Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and ^— 

17 STEUART STREET 
IAN FRANCISCO 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



News from Abroad 



The accommodation for officers in 
the standard ships building for the 
British Government is arranged so 
as to secure the most favorable con- 
ditions. The principal features are 
as follows: The officers are berthed 
in a deckhouse situated on the bridge 
superstructure, the rooms are elec- 
trically lighted and provided with 
efficient heating and ventilation ar- 
rangements, each executive and engi- 
neer officer is provided with a sep- 
arate cabin, and a smoking room is 
provided for the general use of the 
officers. 

Gaston Pellerin de la Touche, Di- 
rector of the Compagnie Generale 
Transatlantique (French Line) and 
the Paris-Lyons-Mediterranean Rail- 
road, has been named as a delegate 
of a group of French shipbuilders 
to visit the United States. He will 
also represent the Government, 
which will furnish him with creden- 
tials to Andre Tardieu, head of the 
French mission in the United States. 
The object of M. De la Touche's visit 
is to complete an understanding with 
American constructors and financiers 
for ship purchases, full powers for 
which have been given him. 

Paul Loil, 30, a German seaman 
passing himself off as British and 
sailing in British vessels, was sen- 
tenced to six months' hard labor at 
Swansea and ordered to be interned 
at the conclusion of his sentence, 
for landing and living at Swansea 
without permission. He had been 
sailing in and out of British ports 
for the last two years under the 
.name of Charles Howell. He was 
arrested aboard a schooner at Swan- 
sea, when, after giving his name as 
Howell, he admitted he was Ger- 
man. He told the police he had lived 
in Germany till he was 14, and had 
since been around the world. 

The decision of the U. S. Govern- 
ment to take over ships under con- 
struction in American yards elicits 
favorable comment in the Norwegian 
press. The newspapers agree that it 
is to Norway's interest if the tonnage 
is used under the American flag, be- 
cause the taxation then is more fa- 
vorable than under the Norwegian 
flag. For this reason several Nor- 
wegian ships already have been 
transferred to American registry. 
Norwegian concerns also arc estab- 
lishing branches in the United States 
and incorporating them with Ameri- 
cans as directors, and it is hoped 
that some of these firms will get the 
management of newly-built Norwe- 
gian ships. 

The demand for engines for stand- 
ard cargo steamers building on ac- 
count of the British Government is 
affecting progress in the works and 
the equipment of British engineer- 
ing shops. In most of the larger 
establishments the tendency before 
Ihe war was to develop the plant in 
the direction of turbine manufacture. 
This tendency became quite pro- 
nounced when the general adoption 
of mechanical gearing showed that 
the turl)ine promised to become the 
best prime mover for cargo steam- 
ers, and some of the big firms began 
to look upon their plant for the 
making of reciprocating engines as 
almost obsolete. They now have 
had to furbish up this plant, and 
the result is that now British shops 
are much better equipped all round 
than they were before the Govern- 
ment's standard program was pro- 
mulgated. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



An Industrial Beginning. — As the 
result of lectures administered to 
him by both his father and the young 
woman of his choice, a certain young 
man decided to turn over a new leaf 
and show some interest in business. 

-Well, Molly," said he to the girl 
one evening, "I am really going 
into business in earnest. Made a be- 
ginning already to-day." 

"Good!" exclaimed Molly. "And 
what was the nature of your start?" 

"I ordered my tailor to make me 
a business suit."— Philadelphia Led- 
ger. 



Wife Didn't Count.— He was par- 
ticularly polite to women and usually 
made a good impression on them. 
A young woman who was visiting 
at the family hotel in which he re- 
sided grew enthusiastic about his 
manners. 

"Oh, he's such a perfect gentle- 
man!" she exclaimed. "He always 
remembers the little things which 
mean so much." 

"Yes," agreed her hostess. "For 
instance, he and his wife were com- 
ing down from the roof in the ele- 
vator last evening. I boarded the 
elevator at the fourth floor, and the 
instant I entered he removed his hat 
and held it in his hand all the rest 
of the way down." — Life. 



A Celestial Rebuke.— Charles B. 
Towns, the antidrug champion, spent 
some time in China several years 
ago with Samuel Merwin, the writer. 
In a Hongkong shop-window they 
noticed some Chinese house-coats of 
particularly striking designs and 
stepped in to purchase one. Mr. 
Towns asked Mr. Merwin to do the 
bargaining. 

"Wantum coatee," said Mr. Mer- 
win to the sleepy-eyed Oriental who 
shuffled up with a grunt. He placed 
several of the coats before them. 

"How muchee Melican monee?" in- 
quired Mr. Merwin. 

"It would aid me in transacting 
this sale," said the Chinaman, "if you 
would confine your language to your 
mother tongue. The coat is seven 
dollars." 

Mr. Merwin took it.— Pittsburg 
Clironicle Telegraph. 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two Individuals, for Instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Do you like a good, long, cool 
smoke? If so, get a package of 
Bagley's Lime Kiln Club Cut 
Plug for your pipe. Manufac- 
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for over fifty years. 



Union 
Made 




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Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cai. 
THIS OI^D AND NOTEWOKTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
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teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, Iceeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
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There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-Informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




HENRY HEINZ 



Phon* Douglai 67S2 



ARTHUR HEINZ 

Original Size 




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GOLD FILLED .50 



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Watches ^ 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



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Silverware, Cut Glass and Clocks for Wedding 

Presents 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Qames Je. Sorensert 

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Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 
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WHEN 

THE TOY SEASON 

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Remember that, de- 
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the slogan that has 
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will apply just as here- 
tofore. 




FOR TOYS 



Market at Fifth 



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CLOTHING a GENTS 

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676 Third Street 

NEAR TOWNSEND, S. F. 



I want you 
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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of AmerJca. 






A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXI, No. 2. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1917. 




Whole No. 2452. 



U. S. CREWS FOR U. S. SHIPS. 



Methods by Which an American Personnel Can be Trained. 



Following is the official stenographic report 
of the recent Washington Conference: 

A conference between the Departments of La- 
bor and Commerce with certain shipping in- 
terests throughout the United States, was called 
to order by Hon. William B. Wilson, Secretary 
of Labor at the Auditorium of the Interior De- 
partment on August 1, 1917, at 10 o'clock a. m. 

Opening Remarks by Secretary of Labor. 

Secretary Wilson: — Gentlemen: I have just 
been advised that Secretary Redfield is busily 
engaged in another conference and will not be 
able to be here until about 10:30 o'clock, which 
accounts for his absence at the time when this 
Conference was called for. 

Several gentlemen have said to me this morn- 
ing_ that they were here with credentials and 
desired to present their credentials to me. May 
I call your attention to the fact that this is not 
a convention; it is a conference, and that cre- 
dentials would therefore only be necessary as 
showing who the person bearing them is. 

It is not expected that there will be any vot- 
ing power exercised in this conference for the 
purpose of imposing anyone's viewpoint upon 
somebody else. Our thought has been to get 
the advantage of the experience of those who 
have given their lives to the shipping indus- 
tries of our country, in an effort to meet the 
problems with which we are confronted. 

One of our greatest problems will ultimately 
be the supply of a sufficient amount of skilled 
labor to man our vessels. For the moment we 
have an ample supply. That is due to the fact 
that while a large number of vessels have been 
destroyed the bulk of the crews have been 
saved, and we have not been rebuilding vessels 
as rapidly as the vessels have been destroyed. 
That gives us a larger number of seamen in 
proportion to the vessels we have than we had 
prior to the breaking out of the war, but we 
are undertaking a tremendous building program. 
In the course of six or eight months we will 
be turning out vessels rapidly. It will require 
seamen to handle those vessels and man them. 
It is essential to safety that we should have 
not only a sufficient number of skilled men to 
handle vessels but that those skilled men should 
be sufficiently experienced in utilizing their skill 
so that they may do almost automatically and 
in proper sequence, the things that arc neces- 
sary for safety. If we are to be prepared to 
man our vessels that we expect to turn out, 
with a proper complement of skilled men, we 
should begin a considerable period in advance 
of the turning out of those vessels. But that 
is not the only phase of the problem confront- 
ing us. Our American merchant marine has 
been manned by a personnel that is not en- 
tirely .'\merican. A comparatively small propor- 
tion of our personnel has been American per- 
sonnel. There is possibly in the neighborhood 
of 30 per cent, of the seamen engaged on Ameri- 
can vessels, while natives of, and in many in- 
stances subjects of Holland, Denmark, Sweden 
and Norway. They are generally very skilled 
men. For centuries the people of those countries . 



have followed the seas, and the men who come 
to our vessels from those countries, as a rule, are 
good seamen. But, as I have said, we have 
about 30 per cent, from those countries, and 
those countries lie in close proximity to the seat 
of war. There is a possibility that even against 
their own desires they may be dragged into 
the conflict and if they are dragged into the 
conflict, if they do engage in the war, and their 
fortunes are thrown on the other side of the 
contest — from the side that we are on — then it 
will be impossible for us to utilize that thirty 
per cent, in manning the vessels engaged in over- 
sea trade, and it will be doubtful as to whether 
it will be advisable for us to utilize their ser- 
vices in manning our vessels in the coastwise 
trade. It will be necessary for us to prepare 
for such a contingency for the possibility of 
losing that portion of the personnel of our sea- 
men. 

We have asked the representatives of the ship 
owners, the representatives of the seamen, to 
come into this conference so that we might 
get from them such suggestions as they may 
have to offer growing out of their experience 
in dealing with the problems. We have asked 
the Shipping Board to be present because it is 
engaged not only in the great ship building 
program, but may ultimately be engaged in the 
great shipping program. We have asked the 
State Department to be represented because 
through the State Department those governments 
engaged in the same side of the contest, that 
we are engaged in, may make any complaints or 
any suggestions that they have to make relative 
to our shipping affairs. 

It is not only necessary that we should be 
able to properly man American vessels, but it 
is also necessary that the Allies in this contest 
shall have their vessels properly manned also. 
The representatives of the British shipping in- 
terests have suggested that changes take place 
in the existing law because they find that Brit- 
ish seamen when they arrive in American ports 
desert in large numbers and reship in American 
vessels, and they are asking that the conditions 
that make that possible be changed. They arc 
making those suggestions through our State De- 
partment, and so in this conference we have 
asked that the State Department be represented 
so that the viewpoint of the allies may find 
expression through that department. 

The Department of Commerce and the De- 
partment of Labor are both interested in the 
solution of the problem, the Department of 
Commerce because of the duty devolving upon 
it to look after the commercial interests of 
tlie country; the Department of Labor because 
of the duty devolving upon it to look after the 
labor interests of the country. We have also 
asked the representatives of the longshoremen, 
of the stevedores, to be present in this con- 
ference because the loading and unloading of 
the vessels is an important factor in our over- 
seas shii)ping. These have been asked to come 
to this conference with the hope that out of 
the multitude of counsel some method may be 
devised by which an American personnel can be 
trained, and thoroughly trained, for our Ameri- 
can vessels, and trained in sufficient quantity 



to meet any emergency which our Government 
may be confronted with. 

Briefly stated, gentlemen, that is the purpose 
of calling this conference, and the form in which 
it has been constituted. I may add that of 
course the legislative branch of the Government 
is interested in the entire subject-matter, and 
we have asked the committees of the two 
Houses of Congress dealing with the merchant 
marine to be represented in this conference. 

I shall be pleased to have any suggestions 
of methods that may be pursued, with respect 
to the methods that you may have in your 
minds of accomplishing the purpose for which 
the conference has been called. 

Address by Captain James S. Gibson. 

Captain Gibson: Mr. Chairman, myself and 
my associates represent the maritime committee 
of the .'\ssociated Chambers of the Pacific Coast. 
I have with me representatives from Southern 
California, San Francisco, and from Puget Sound. 
I think it was at the request of the Pacific Coast 
that this meeting of this conference was post- 
poned from the 18th of July to the 1st of 
August, to enable us to get together and come 
east on this measure, and we have with us 
representatives of the various organizations 
which go to make up the personnel of the 
crews — masters and mates, engineers, firemen, 
coal passers, seamen, boatsmen and stewards. 

This meeting is one of patriotism brought 
about by a condition which has been forced 
upon us, and I think you will all agree that 
it is a pretty strong evidence of our patriotism 
when we come 3,000 miles to a climate like 
Washington from a climate like Puget Sound 
and the Pacific Coast. 

The object of this conference, as described 
in the communication of yourself and the Sec- 
retary of Commerce, is for the establishment 
of harmonious relations between seamen and 
sliip owners, the removal of the obstacles, real 
or imaginary, that stand in the way of main- 
taining the present forces of seamen and adding 
to the number as the necessity may require. 
There is nothing in the minds of the ship 
owners to-day that suggests any changes, any 
repeal or amendment of any law, but there is a 
strong feeling that in order to meet this eiu- 
crgency there must be some elasticity allowed 
in this conference. It is the suggestion, as 
far as myself and my associates are concerned, 
that we should recommend to the -Administra- 
tion tlie suspension of any laws which create 
any kind of a burden or which throw any ob- 
stacles in the way of finding a ])ersonncl for 
this immense fleet which is now being con- 
structed. 

It is all very well, Mr. Secretary, for rep- 
resentatives of associations to say that we have 
plenty of men, but we have not, sir. The 
Shipping Board to-day is beginning to feel the 
scarcity of seamen. There were ships lying 
at San I'Vancisco, when I was leaving there, 
ti:at had been tiiere six or seven days. Those 
ships are available but they cannot move 
promptly because we are unable to get crews 
for them. There are ships at Puget Sound, lying 
at the mouth of the Sound at Port Townsend, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



that have been there for weeks in order to 
comply with the laws, and even those are per- 
mitted to go to sea under some special dispen- 
sation. 

Now, in order to create a sufficient number 
of seamen tliere must be some elasticity to the 
time of service. There must be some schools 
established. I understand the Shipping Board 
has now in operation a certain number of 
schools on the Atlantic Coast, and they are 
working toward tiie Pacific. Speaking for Cali- 
fornia and for Puget Sound, we have been 
for some time previous to the declaration of war, 
endeavoring to get established training ships for 
seamen, officers and engineers. The State 
Legislature of Washington at its last session 
enacted a law appropriating $25,000 a year to 
be used in connection with a certain appropria- 
tion made some time ago by the Feedral Gov- 
ernment, 1 think for the Navy Department, 
whereby the Government was to provide a ves- 
sel and set aside an appropriation of, I think, 
something like $25,000 for six of those train- 
ing vessels to be running on the Atlantic, the 
Gulf and the Lakes, and two on the Pacific, 
one at California and the other at Puget 
Sound. We have been trying to encourage our 
young men to go to sea, anticipating that now 
is the psychological moment for the up-build- 
ing of the merchant marine, and W'e do feel, 
Mr. Secretary, that there never was a time 
in the history of this country when it was 
so necessary to forsake partisanship and make 
for patriotism. I assume that there is no 
man here representing the organizations that 
form the personnel that does not feel the same 
degree of patriotism in this country as you 
and I feel, but they hold with tenacity to 
the strength of their organizations. They fear 
and anticipate that any changes now may re- 
sult in weakening their organizations. It is 
a mistaken idea, sir. It will tend to strengthen 
their organizations. When this war is over, and 
we drop back, as we certainly will, into the 
routine that we have been in for quite a while, 
there will be a splendid personnel for those 
leaders to take hold of, and they will take 
hold of them, we know that, and we are not 
offering any objection, or any suggestions. We 
feel that if we have to deal with organizations, 
that the stronger the organizations and the 
better they can comply with the requirement, 
the more satisfactory it will be to deal with 
them. But at this time let us bury partisan- 
ship; let us stand back of the President with- 
out any personal feeling whatever. Let us be 
patriots, if we arc going to be patriots, and 
not four-flushers; let us get back of the Ad- 
ministration heart and soul and join hands, 
every man offering himself and offering his 
services to the Government. 1 know the ship- 
masters, sir. 1 spent my days with them 
in the days when the American merchant ma- 
rine was something that we were proud of, 
and I think the time is coming when we are 
going to be proud of the coming merchant 
marine, and I feel also that there is an oppor- 
tunity for everyone of us to go in and do our 
best. 

I am offering my services, sir, to-day, to take 
command of any transport going into the 
Atlantic for the purpose of carrying troops 
to the front, and I feel I am qualified. 

I should like to say, Mr. Secretary, that the 
men representing the organizations from the 
Pacific Coast are able leaders, and influential 
men among their organizations. What an ex- 
ample, sir, it would be if those men would 
come to the front and say to the men of 
their organizations out there, "I am going into 
the service." Why, sir, 80 per cent of the 
men would follow the leader, and they would 
be proud of their leaders when their services 
are offered through patriotic motives. 

We have not much to say that you and the 
President and the rest of the Administration 
are not fully aware of. The creation of this 
merchant marine is sudden, but we must not 
overlook the gravity of this situation. It 
means a great deal. We have got to devise 
ways and means of keeping these ships mov- 
ing, and the fact that we say we have got 
plenty of officers, plenty of engineers, plenty 
of seamen, plenty of cooks and stewards, docs 
not produce the men. If these organizations 
had those men I would suggest that a record 
of those men, their obligation, their present 
situation as to whether they are employed or 
seeking employment, be placed in the hands 
of a representative of the Council of National 
Defence, or the Shipping Board for the pur- 
pose of drawing from those names men to 
command and to equip the vessels. A man 
in these days should not stand too much on 
the position that he wants, but take the posi- 
tion that is offered to him, and he should 
take it in a spirit of patriotism. 

God grant that this war is not going to last 
long, but let us get in while it is lasting and 
make it as short as possible. (Applause). 
Statement of Mr. Andrew Furuseth. 

Mr. Furuseth. Mr. Secretary, the real ques- 
tion here is, as we see it, first are the men 
to be found and, secondly, how can they be 
found and induced to do the work required? 
In order to be able to have some conception 
of the number of men available, specifically 
among the licensed officers in the deck and 
engine department, it seems to me, sir, that 
it would be well now to hear from those rep- 
resenting the deck department and the engine 



department as to the number they know are 
available at the present time for employment 
such as has been described. I suggest that 
some one representing the deck department be 
called upon for a statement as to what their 
position is in reference to that matter. 

I want to say at this time that there are 
three organizations here representing the deck 
department, one is the Masters, \Iates and 
Pilots, another made up very largely of men 
in the inside work and a third composed of 
men representing the ocean-going men, so we 
ought to hear from the representative of the 
Masters and Pilots and then from the rep- 
resentatives of the ocean-going men. In or- 
der to reach some method I suggest that that 
be the proceeding and then call upon the 
Engineer Department afterwards. 

Secretary Wilson. I shall be very glad to 
hear from any representative of the Masters, 
Mates and Pilots who desires to make a state- 
ment. At this time, gentlemen, let me pre- 
sent Secretary Redfield. 

Address by Mr. Hollister Davis. 

Mr. Hollister Davis (representing the Am- 
erican Association of Masters, Mates and Pi- 
lots). Mr. Secretary, we come here a little 
bit handicapped, but we come in a patriotic 
spirit and we want to be considered so first, 
last and all time. Many of our men now 
who would be available for sea-going vessels 
have been drawn in the Naval Reserves and 
other branches of the Government — men who 
could be used on sea-going vessels and other 
men who hold inland licenses to perform their 
services. 

As near as we can estimate we have 700 
men available on the Great Lakes, who, with 
a little tuition, w-ould be available to go to 
sea. We have appro.ximately 2,000 men on the 
Atlantic Coast, and possibly 1,500 on the Pa- 
cific Coast who hold masters' and mates' li- 
censes. Many of our men on the Atlantic 
Coast hold licenses who are working with the 
masters, mates and pilots. It is our intention 
to take a census of our men so that we may 
know just what we have. 

We are opposed to the alien first, last and 
all the time. We believe that if American 
citizens had manned the vessels which have 
been torpedoed on the seas within the last 
three years, that the casualties would have 
been less. I cannot conceive, as an American 
citizen, of an incident like that which hap- 
pened off Nantucket when six or seven ships 
were torpedoed and the master of the U-boat 
said, '"You lay there," and "You lay there, I 
am going to torpedo this fellow." I cannot 
imagine Yankee skippers being in charge of 
those boats waiting there for a stiletto being 
jabbed into their bow. Those vessels were in 
charge of aliens and if they had been in 
charge of Yankee skippers one would have 
gone one way, another would have gone an- 
other way and they certainly would not have 
gotten them all. Lately there have been 
cases where they dodged the torpedoes and 
dodged them by a zigzag course and manipu- 
lation of the vessels. 

I believe that while aliens might be citi- 
zens of the United States and have American 
licenses, their sympathies are with the other 
side and we are, therefore, opposed to them. 
W^e believe in manning our ships by American 
citizens. 

We have approximately 900 men on the At- 
lantic Coast employed on barges in coastwise 
trade up and down the Atlantic Coast w^ho 
are holding foreign licenses now. There are 
also American citizens who hold foreign li- 
censes. We are not especially opposed to 
those men if they can be educated. We would 
like to see our young American boys edu- 
cated. 

Our Deck Department we admit is handi- 
capped, but there are reasons for it and the 
same reasons obtain to-day. A boy goes aboard 
a ship, goes into the Deck Department, works 
there a little while and in a short time he 
finds out he can get from $15 to $20 more 
down in the hold, he does not have to buy 
a uniform, he does not have to buy anything 
but a pair of overalls and an undershirt and 
the result is he goes into that department and 
that is the reason we have not more American 
boys with licenses to-day. 

As to the clacticity of the law, perhaps if 
there had been more elasticity and the laws 
were not so stringent, we would have more 
of a surplus to-day than we have. We are 
not prepared to-day to tell you just how many 
men we have, but we certainly will take a 
census and supply you with the number of 
officers we have. 

Statement of Mr. Walter P. Miller. 

It has been prophesied that the end of the 
war would find the United States with a great 
Merchant Marine, and a great Navy. Proph- 
ecy, however, does not exercise the wizard's 
wand and bring to pass that which is only 
accomplished by securing the necessary factors 
essential to its particular end. 

The one great factor that is uppermost in 
men's minds today is the necessity for having 
men to man the ships that are now being 
built, and those that will be built. 

In talking to a very dear friend on this 
subject, a man whose forebears were captains 
of the clipper type of vessels, that so proudly 
maintained the supremacy of the. United States 



on the sea at that time, he told me that the 
men holding the positions of captains of ves- 
sels, and their immediate subordinates were 
looked up to by the people of their home 
towns as being gentlemen of first rank, and 
highly esteemed for their honorable calling. 
That in those days young men were taken into 
the navy and their superior officers consid- 
ered them wards for whom they were re- 
sponsible. 

They were trained in all the arts and mys- 
teries of sea craft; they were given a liberal 
education and the way was made possible for 
them to reach any berth for which they were 
fitted. 

Unfortunately for the nation we failed to 
maintain our high place in naval supremacy, 
and it was lost to the successful invasion of 
the steam built carrying craft that moved 
faster and were manned by a class of labor 
at a greatly reduced cost of wages. 

Seamen have fallen to a place of disrepute 
in men's minds. They should and ought to 
be welcome to every place enjoyed by brother 
workmen in other crafts. 

This being so, the necessary steps should be 
taken toward securing a higher grade of ef- 
ficient, capable young men to enter the navy. 

First. To remove the stigma that hangs 
over the profession of sailor. 

Second. To give him the opportunity to se- 
cure an education. 

Third. To make the surroundings and living 
as good as he could have on land. 

Fourth. AN'ages that would be attractive. 

Fifth. The opportunity for advancement. 

I know that it has been said that the re- 
cent laws which were passed made it impos- 
sible for the ship owners in this country to 
compete with foreign vessels because their 
cost of manning them was so great as com- 
pared with the cost abroad, where they em- 
ploy Asiatic labor. 

In addition to this there may have been 
other restrictions militant against the employ- 
ment of domestic labor. 

I have been told that it was because of 
these laws that the Pacific Mail sold its fleet 
and went out of business. 

This seems unusually hard as these vessels 
would be of more value now to our Govern- 
ment than at any other time. 

It may be that it will of necessity require 
Governmental assistance either as subsidy or 
in some other more practical way to meet the 
competition that will have to be met in order 
to maintain the high degree of service suit- 
able for our .American youth. 

With the brains and the mechanical inge- 
nuity and the wonderful loyalty that spurs men 
on to do the best that is in them we are 
able to create wonderful results in the build- 
ing of boats, and under Mr. Hurley's direc- 
tion we will, in a few short months have a 
fleet that will surprise the world. 

Then it is that we will need the men for 
tiieir guidance from our shores to foreign 
shores, men of fitness and capacity. 

To make the service sufficiently attractive 
is the problem that I believe is before this 
conference for its consideration. 

There is another very important point that 
I would like to bring to your attention, and 
that is the employment of the alien of whom 
there are millions in this country. We have 
sons of Norwegians, and sons of Scandina- 
vians to whom the inherited call of the sea 
still comes. 

In 1872 there was passed a revised statute 
covering the Merchant Marine, and giving to 
the alien the rights of citizenship if he had 
served for three years on vessels of American 
registry subsequent to his declaration of in- 
tention, and been honorably discharged. 

It was evidently the intention of the law 
to reward the alien for his service in this 
way. Many recruits might be secured to the 
service if this fact were properly exploited 
among the people we want to reach. 

With the possibility of securing to the navy 
aliens who would be desirable citizens, having 
respect and loyalty to the Government to- 
gether with sufficient inducements for the 
younger men to take up the profession as one 
worthy of their best efforts, would seem a 
stepping stone to the accomplishment of the 
purpose of this conference. 

I would like to ask this question of Mr. 
Furuseth: Is it true that .American boys can- 
not get a chance on .\merican vessels unless 
the union authorizes or agrees to it? 

In asking this question I am not taking any 
exception to the attitude of the union on this 
point. Patriotic duty has the right of way 
to-day. America is in this war to establish 
her principles of righteous living. It is un- 
thinkable that our boys could be brought to 
the level of coolie labor, and that is what 
it means if we lose. We will win and the 
standards of the world will be .\merican stan- 
dards, and every organization is going to do 
its very best in helping the President in his 
great work. 

I hope for the good of the country at large 
that careful consideration will be given these 
suggestions, and that the results of this meet- 
ing will mark another step forward in the 
great cause of Democracy. (Applause). 

Secretary Wilson: Gentlemen, I wish to 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Thinking Citizens Uphold Governor. 

The Non-Partisan Leader, of Fargo, 
North Dakota, official magazine of the 
Farmers' Non-Partisan League, is in hearty 
accord with Governor Frazier's proclama- 
tion to peace officers that they must 
check "law and order" mobs or be re- 
moved from office. 

"The proclamation expresses the views 
on labor troubles held by every thought- 
ful citizen who is not swayed by prej- 
udice or unreasoning bitterness," says 
this paper. 

"Any person burning or attempting to 
burn crops, destroy harvesting machinery 
or commit disorderly acts of any kind 
against employers of labor will be attend- 
ed to under the law, the Governor says. 

"On the other hand, the Governor says 
that any attempts by peace officers to 
violate the law on the other side, will 
likewise be suppressed. Laborers are 
not to be clubbed and driven out of the 
community because they ask wages higher 
than peace officers may think justified ; 
they are not to be mobbed because they 
assemble peacefully to hold meetings, or 
because they are 'broke.' 

"In other words, the Governor knows 
that labor riots, lynchings and other dis- 
graceful proceedings are usually the re- 
sult of enforcing the law against one side 
of the controversy and failing or refusing 
to enforce it against the other. We have 
laws to take care of persons attempting 
to destroy property and it should be en- 
forced vigorously against them, says the 
Governor. But it is not for peace officers, 
or mobs or 'vigilance' societies to take 
the law into their hands. When they 
do, they can not blame the laborer who 
thinks he has a grievance, when he takes 
the law into his hands. We do not want 
civil war in the United States, now of all 
times." 



"Loyalty" Leagues Rampant in Arizona. 

John Murray, of the Typographical 
union, and Richard G. Rigg, of the Globe 
(Ariz.) Miners' union, are in Washing- 
ton as representatives of the Arizona State 
Federation of Labor to acquaint the 
American Federation of Labor with the 
work of Arizona "Loyalty" leagues, which 
are running rampant in that State and 
overthrowing all semblance of law. 

Following the deportation of over 1,000 
workers from Bisbee, on July 12, last, the 
Arizona State Federation of Labor, at 
its annual convention at Clifton, appointed 
a committee of five to go to Bisbee and 
report on conditions. The committee car- 
ried credentials from the Governor of the 
vState. When the committee arrived at 
Bisbee it was met by a band of armed 
vigilantes in five automobiles who stopped 
the unionists in full view of a regiment of 
federal troops and commanded them to 
"get out of Bisbee." The committee re- 
turned to Clifton and the convention as- 
signed Murray and Rigg to go to Wash- 
ington, after declaring against L W. W. 
tactics, but demanding the protection of 
the law for every citizen. Every Arizona 



official, from the Governor down, has ac- 
knowledged that the stand of the unionists 
is correct, but refuses to do anything. 

The Bisbee strike started a short time 
prior to July 12. The men demanded 
safety conditions, higher wages, and pro- 
tection against a blacklist which operates 
through physical examination. The men 
were put on trains and deported to Co- 
lumbus, N. M. A large percentage has 
no affiliation with the L W. W. Bisbee 
is under armed guards to stop them from 
returning. The guards are members of a 
so-called "Loyalty" league, financed by 
the copper interests. Every worker must 
join the league or lose his job. 

The league gives permits to work and 
has branches in almost every town and 
city in the State where there is a mine. 
Its officers are mine managers and bosses. 

The Phelps-Dodge Corporation, ac- 
knowledged to be in the control of Stan- 
dard Oil interests, dominates Arizona and 
extends from Sonora, Mexico, through 
Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado into 
one vast copper mine combination. 

At Globe, Arizona, recently 42 members 
of the Miners' Union were picketing on 
the county road and were arrested for 
"rioting" by members of the "Loyalty" 
league. Among these were all the officers 
of the union, except Recording Secretary 
Rigg. who is now in Washington. These 
men are under $1,000 bail. Their trials 
are in September and they expect to be 
railroaded to the penitentiary unless the 
labor movement comes to their protec- 
tion. The Arizona committee now in this 
city says the plan of the Phelps-Dodge 
corporation is to jail the most active 
trade unionists and then blacklist them 
on the ground that they are "criminals." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Trouble for Wages by Law. 

Labor's dissatisfaction with State arbi- 
tration proceedings has increased because 
of a ruling that a wage award by a ma- 
jority of a board is not sufficient unless 
that majority is a majority of the whole 
board. The decision is considered so 
serious that unionists are urging it be 
immediately tested. 

The Daily Herald, Adelaide, South 
Australia, has this to say of the arbitra- 
tion laws in this State : 

"When the wages board system was 
first introduced it was supposed to be a 
panacea for all industrial ills. The sequel, 
unfortunately, has proved how unreliable 
was this expectation. Instead of simpli- 
fying matters wages boards have com- 
plicated them. Even at best, as they are 
now constituted, wages boards are more 
representative of the employers' interests 
than they are of the employes. 

"If the strike is, as is contended by 
many, a barbarous method, it has some 
recommendations on the score of simpli- 
city, definiteness, and directness that are 
not possessed by other schemes. Legal 
action may be more refined, but, without 
saying anything on the question of the 
rights or wrongs of striking, when it 
comes to a climax, the less refined way 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page S.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY, 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodcrnes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbciterinncn Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 3SS Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World^s Workers 



Tlie August issue of the British 
Labor Gazette reports that at nearly 
all the ports in Great Britain and 
Ireland the supply of seamen and 
firemen for mercantile ships during 
July was about equal to the de- 
mand. 

The forty-eighth annual congress 
of the co-operative, distributive and 
productive societies of the United 
Kingdom was held at Lancaster, 
England, June 12 to 14, 1916. About 
1350 delegates were in attendance. 
The societies had at that time a 
membership of 3,310,724, the trade 
done during the year amounting to 
£165,634,195 ($806,058,810). Approxi- 
mately 30 per cent, of the employes 
of the societies are members of the 
Amalgamated Union of Co-operative 
Employes, formed in 1891 as the 
Manchester District Co-operative 
Employes' Association and amalga- 
mated with other associations a few 
years later. Disputes with this or- 
ganization, together with the allied 
conciliation boards, hours and wages 
boards, and a co-operative defense 
committee, were the subject of a 
considerable part of the debate of 
the congress. 

Several items in the New Zealand 
yearbook (published at Wellington 
March 1, 1917) are of interest to la- 
bor. The number of old age pen- 
sioners on March 31, 1916, was 19,- 
804, an increase of 452 or 2.3 per 
cent, over 1915, and the amount paid 
out in pensions during the year end- 
ing on that date, was £479,339 
($2,332,703.24), an increase of 4 per 
cent, over 1915, the cost per head of 
population being 8s. 9d ($2.13) as 
against 8s. 5d. ($2.05) in 1915. The 
number of widows' pensions in force 
on March 31, 1916, was 1890, an in- 
crease of 5.7 per cent, over the pre- 
ceding year, and the amount paid to 
them was £36,357 ($176,931.34), an 
increase of 15 per cent, over 1915. 
There was but one strike of any im- 
portance, involving 233 workers who 
asked for an increase of 10 per cent, 
in wages. This had not been settled 
on March 31, 1916. Of 177 disputes 
dealt with by the commissioners and 
councils of conciliation, 134 (75.7 per 
cent.) were settled or substantially 
settled by them. 

France's losses at home, through 
the death of infants and children, 
together with a birthrate for last 
year estimated at only 8 per 1000, 
against a death-rate of perhaps 20 
per 1,000 (exclusive of death from 
mi-litary causes), has led to the ap- 
pointment of a Red Cross commis- 
sion to look into the situation on 
the ground and to recommend ways 
in which this country can help. 
The work is financed by Mrs. Will- 
iam Lowell Putnam, of ' Boston. 
The head of the commission is Dr. 
William P. Lucas, professor of pedi- 
atrics at the University of Califor- 
nia. Associated with him are Dr. 
J. Morris Siemens, of the Yale 
Medical School; Dr. Julius Parker 
Sedgwick, of the University of Min- 
nesota; Dr. N. O. Pearce, of Clover- 
ton, Minn.; Dr. John C. Baldwin, 
of Pittsburgh; Dr. Clain F. Gclston, 
assistant to Dr. Lucas at California; 
and the following, described in the 
announcement as "experts in sociol- 
ogy and child-welfare work": Mrs. 
Siemens, wife of Dr. Siemens; Mrs. 
Lucas, wife of Dr. Lucas; Elizabeth 
Ashe, head resident of Neighbor- 
hood House, San Francisco; and 
Rosamond Gilder, daughter of the 
late Richard Watson Gilder, the 
poet. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BROWN &L SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florshcim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 
109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

122 Sixth Street, San Pedro 

PROPRIETORS OF 

STANDARD BOTTLING WORKS 

Manufacturers and Bottlers of All Flavors Union Bottler 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 
531 Front Street 
Two Entrances 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cat. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 
STATIONERY 

Lob Angeles Sxaminer and All San 

Fi-ancUco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



SEATTLE, WASH., DEEP SEA 

FISHERMEN'S UNION 

LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, Jens 
Arne.son, Peter 
Brennan, S. 
Burton, H. 
Berkey, Ole 
Backstrom, C. 
Chrtstensen, John 
Collins, G. 
Condradsen, Julius 
Carroll, James 
Carravan, Walter 

Wm. 
Campbell, Daiiiely 
Degerstrom, Arthur 
Dahl. Alfred 
Dragland, F. O. 
Ehler, Geo. 
Eriksen, Magne 
Rngdal, Isak 
Edvords, C. 
Ford. C. F. 
Fowler, Henry 
Kjellestad, Thomas 
Gustafson, 0. J. 
Giske. Lewis 
Grenkvist, Oscar 
Gorgensen, G. 
Greene, Ben 
Howlett, James 
Hanson, John 
Hedlund, Pete 
Hansen, Gilbert 
Johnson. Ole 
.Iohan.«en, John 
.lolinsen. Olaf 
Kelly, Mike 
Kaalheinsen. Alfred 
Larsen, Chas. 



Larsen, Olaf 
Larson, Peder 
Larentzen, Harrold 
Lindkvist, Karl 
Morgan, William 
Moldver, A. 
Munroe, Wallace 
Nelson, Henry 
Nilson, N. A. 
Nilson. Adolf 
Nilson, Carl J. F. 
Ness, John 
Olsen, Oliver 
Olsen, Servin 
Osmundsen, Olaf 
Ongstad, P. J. 
Olsen, Garnett 
Petersen, Hans 
Pedersen, John A. 
Pedersen, Nils 
Petersen, "V. 
Petersen, Julius 
Petersen, Lars 
Pedersen, J. R. 
Pedersen, Chas. O. 
Rocs, Christ 
Sjosvold, Joe 
Shanahan, Benedict 
Swerdrup, Walter 
Sandberg, Oto 
Thompson, Alf. 
Thomasen, Peder 
Turner, Ruben 
Torkelsen, Fred A. 
Vaagen, Kristoffer 
Winter, Edvard 
White, A. 
Walters, G. P. 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE— S. G. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and have no solicitors 
out. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



REGISTRATION CARDS AT 

SAILORS' UNION OFFICE, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Members whose names appear in 
this column, should call for their 
card at once: 



Aboling, Mattlss 
Baerner, P. F. 
Carlson, Carl 
Dablin, Harry 
Fischer, P. A. E. 
Geisendorfer, Eniil 
Gregg, Oliver 
Gustafsson, T. S. 
Hansen, R. F. 
Hohensang, Max G. 
Holmgren, Relnhold 
Hunonen, Cust 
Jacobson, Joaklm 
Jensen, Lorents 
Johannsen, A. 
Joyce, William 
Meek. Ole J. 
Mickelson, Julius 
Moss, A. W. 
Mullen, Harry P. 



Nelson, Axel 
Neumann, John 
Nielson, Waliniar 
Narton, Karl 
Olsen, Dial 
Ozezerski, Paul 
Paavilainen, A. 
Patterson, John S. 
Quiroga, Juan 
Rinne, Hjalmar 
Schramm, Albert 
Svendsen, Henry 
Treho, George 
Vinx, Henry 
Wall. Alfred 
Wehr, Fred 
Westorlk, Ingalf 
Wez wager, Andrew 
WUhelmson, Carl 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain 2md readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absenc* 
of the UNION STAMP, 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine. Sec-TrMt. 



The Anglo- GalMa Trust Gompanij 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 

offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCH K.S; 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS.. $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 16,000,000 

COMMERCI.AL SAVINGS TRUST 



San Pedro Letter Lut. 



-Viiderson. Otto 
Adier. H. 

Andree, E. A. -1410 
Abrahamson, A. 
Anderson, Oskar 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andersen, Frank 

-332 
Ale.\andersen, Paul 
Bergesen, Sivert 
Brown, G. 
Bertelsen, Bertel 
Blllington, Martin 
Bulander, B. 
Brien, Hans 
Bentsen, Hans B. 
Christenseii, A. 
Carlson, R. C. 
Carlson, Gustaf 
Christensen, E. 
Dahlstiom, Ernest 
Pougal, A. 
1 )reger. Jack 
Dalberg, O. 
ICklund, Swen 
Kmkow, Otto 
E.iton, Isaac 
Folvig, John 
Friberg, Peter 
Fosberg, Leonard 
Folvig, Ludvig 
Grigolit. Erd 
Gerliardt, John 
Gundersen, K. 
Gvmnerud. Thorvald 
Gerard. Albert 
Giinvvald. John 
Gusek. Ben 
Ilcoshe, Henry 
Hoek, A. 
Hunter. Ernest 
lloglund, J. A. 
llelinius, Elnar 
Ilagger, F. W. 
Ilillman, Max 
Hedm.an, John M. 
Jakson, John H. 
Jolianson, N. A. 
Johnson. John A. 
.lohnson. Gunnar 
Joliansen, Fred 
Jansson, Bernhard 
Karre, M. V. 
Kron. H. 
Kr\iBer. Gustaf 
Kallas, M. 
Kristensen, Niels 
Kallio, Franz 
Kind. H. 
Lorontzen, Karl 
Lundquist, Ralph 
I-und, J. W. M. 
Livendahl, Gus 
Leideker, E. 
Lauritzon, Ole 
Labrentz, Max 



Laakso, P. E. -14H 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Letchford, A. 
Mokew. W. 
Magnussen, Sigurd 
Morris, Oscar 
MIchaelsen, Mattt 
Marion, J. 
Malmberg. Ellis 
Martensson. A. 
Mamers, Carl 
Miller, R. E. 
Metz, John 
Mlnners, Herman 
Moberg, Karl G. 
Nelson, Oscar 
Neskanin, Gus 
Nicolaisen. Hana 
Olsen. Tollcf 
Olsson, O. S. 
Olsen, Ole W. 
Pera, Gusti 
Petersen, Olaf 
Peterson, K. E. 

-903 
Paul, Peter G. 
Petersen. C. -1493 
Paulsen, James 
Pederson, John 
Peterson, Alfred 
Pedersen, Alf. -1323 
Palmquist, A. 
Peterson. Hugo 
Petterson, C. V. 
Petersen, N. -1234 
Petersen, John -1136 
Raaum, Harry 
Rivera, John 
Rahlph, Th 
Retal, Otto 
Raun, Einar 
Swanson, James 
Sanders, Chas. 
Selewskl, Franz 
Schulze. Max 
Schroeder, Alfred 
Stcnsland, Paul 
Strahle, Chas. 
Seiander. W. 
Thirup, C. 
Tahtlnen, HJ 
Tamml, E. 
Thompson, Maurice 
Thaysen, Arthur 
Thoren, G. A. 
Thompson, Alex 
Wichnian, C. 
Warkala. John 
Warkkala. John 
Ysberg. .Vdolf 

Packages. 
Bluker, John 
Kruger, Wm. 
Rasmussen, Svend 
Novak, Andy 
Kramer, George 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



.\nderson. Gust II. 
Bolim, Frank 
Brandt, Arvld 
liohni, Franz 
Carlbon, Chas. B. 
Cariera, Peter 
Dully, Alexander 
Elliot, Austin E. 
Fisher, Fritz 
Guidersen, E. 
Gngory, W. 
(ieigcr. Joe 
Harding, Ellis 
llylander. Gust 
Hartman, Fritz 
Iiiney, Fred 
.lorgensen, Robert 
Jones, H. 
Jtliansson, Charles 

-2407 
Johnson, Karl 
.Jensen, H. T. 
Kaskincn, .Mbcrt 
ICristenson, Wni. 
Kroon, Al. 
Kelly, AVm. 
Knofsky, E. W. 
I.:ialzt'n. Hugo 
Larson, Hans 



Mitchel, J. W. 
Melirtens, H. 
Nielson, Carl O. 
Nelson, A. S. 
Olson, David 
Okvist, Gust 
Oglive, Wm. 
Paulson. Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Paul. George 
Peterson, M. 
Palmqvlst, Albert 
Petersen, Anton 

-1675 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rasmussen, O. 
Rubins, Carl A. 
Samuelson, Sam 
Stinesson, Harold 
Siebert. Gust 
Swanson, Oskar 
Swanson, John L. 
Tuhkanen, Johan J. 
Westengren, C. W. 
Wagner, W. M. 
Welllnger, L. 
Warren, Geo. 
AVilling, -.Vni 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter Liet. 



.Anderson, Chris. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andeson, A. P. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Bordwlnen. Bob 
Bleasing, W. 
Bohm. Gust 
Browen. Alexander 
Brngard. N. 
Brun, Mattla 
Brant. Max 
Carlson, Adolph M. 
Crentz, F. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Dltrich 
Christensen, Louis 
Davis, Frank A. 
Donaldson, Harry 
roknian. Gust 
Ellingsen, Erllng 
Eliassen, John A. 
Fattinger, August 
Fisher, Charley 
Frohne, Robert 
Gerard, Albert 
Gold, Herman 
Graf, Otto 
Grant, August 
Gray, William 
Gran, Aksel 
Gronlund, Oskar 
Gronros, Oswald 

-414 
Gwcno, Pife 
Gran, Axel 
Grag. William 
Hansen. Thorlelf 
7'>'>i9en, .TacK 
Hansen, Max Owe 
Harlev. Alex 
High, Edward 
Holniroos, Alin 
Hedrlck, Jack 
Jensen, L. 
Johansson, Arvo 
Johanssen, John F. 



Johnsen, Carl 
Johnson, Hans 
Johnson. Hllmar 
Kessa, Theo. 
Kord, Hjalmar 
Kreander, WIctor 
Kuldsen, John 
Ligoski, Joe 
Lohtonen, Arthur 
Longren, Charley 
Malkoff, Peter 
Melners, Herman 
Meyers, George 
Nelson, Aug. 
Newman, I. 
Nielsen, Alf. W. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nilsen, Harry 
Olsen, Alf. 
Olsson, C. 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Peterson, Nels 
Pettersen, Carl 
Rahfl, J. 
Risenius, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Sandquist. Gunnar 
Semlth, Ed. 
Schenk. Albert 
Shemwall, Sigurd 
Sckultz, Bernt. 
Teuber, Rolf. 
Thom. Alek. 
Thornland. .Tohn 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Waales, Edgar 
Wagner. Ed. 
Wedequlst. Axel 
Williams, T. C. 
Williams, .Tohn 
Wolf, R. G. 
Zoerb. W. 

Packages. 
Billings. George 
Ellingsen, Eriing 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



A contract for a $300,000 lumber carrier has 
been placed with the Matthews yards of Ho- 
quiani, Wash., by the Hartwood Lumber Com- 
pany of Raymond. The vessel is to be 250 feet 
long and will have capacity for carrying 1,500,000 
feet of lumber. 

The Pacific Coast Fishing and Canning Com- 
pany of Sonera, Mexico, has bought the schooner 
"Frolic" at Portland, Ore., and has started her 
down the coast for service in southern waters. 
According to officials of the company, other 
vessels are to be bought for the service. 

A new ferry service between San Pedro, 
Wilmington and Fish Harbor is being con- 
sidered by the Harbor Commission to overcome 
the demand for a drawbridge over the west 
basin channel and a road to the Fish Harbor 
wharves. Requests have been made to the 
Commission to install a municipal ferry. 

The Metal Trades Council of Seattle has re- 
ceived advices from its representatives at Wash- 
ington which resulted in the cancellation of the 
pending steel ship yards strike. The scale sub- 
mitted by the unions has been granted by the 
Shipping Board to January 1, following which 
another agreement is to be made. 

The steam schooners "Mukilteo," "Port An- 
geles," "Multnomah" and "Nome City," hitherto 
engaged in carrying lumber to San Francisco, 
will be temporarily withdrawn from the lumber 
trade and employed in carrying coal from Puget 
Sound and British Columbia ports to San Fran- 
cisco, according to an announcement just made 
at Seattle. 

Extensive improvements to the Aberdeen ship- 
yards, owned by Grant Smith & Co., of Boston, 
including increasing the capacity of the yards 
from a three to a five ship yard, will be made 
in the coming few months. Manager Andrew 
Peterson announced recently. Instead of three 
launching slips there will be five, and the crew 
employed will be increased from 250 to 500. 

W. F. Turner, vice-president of the Great 
Northern Pacific Steamship Company, announced 
that the company has been notified that the 
steamers "Great Northern" and "Northern Pa- 
fic" will not be taken by the Government until 
May next year, and meanwhile they will be 
kept in regular service. The "Great Northern," 
as usual, will make several winter trips to 
Hawaii. 

Chief Officer K. Matsudo and thirty-one other 
survivors of the crew of the Japanese freight 
steamer "Kotohira Maru," which was wrecked in 
Alaskan waters on July 27, have arrived at Se- 
attle on a passenger steamer from Seward, and 
will be sent to Japan. Nothing has been heard 
of Captain Shioga and sixteen men who left the 
wreck in a lifeboat, and it is believed they 
perished, the weather having been stormy. 

During the month of August twenty-eight 
vessels loaded at the mills in the lower Colum- 
bia River district and their combined cargoes 
amounted to 23,429,252 feet of lumber. Twenty- 
six of these vessels, carrying 20,992,000 feet, 
went to California. Other shipments of lumber 
products included 16,531 bundles of box shooks, 
1140 bundles staves and 300,000 shingles. Ship- 
ments of flour by water to California amounted 
to 1230 tons. 

Two, and possibly three, four-masted wooden 
schooners are to be built at Bandon, Ore. The 
Pacific Steamship Company of San Francisco 
has purchased the old Price shipyard site. The 
Price yard was operated about eight years ago 
when a number of steam and sailing vessels 
were built. The ])lant was later destroyed liy 
fire. Hans Reed, a draftsman of Marshfield and 
George Ross, a ship builder of San Francisco, 
will have charge of the yard. 

At the present price of sugar, the cargo 
burned at sea on the "R. P. Rithet" while en 
route to San Francisco was $266,000. The value 
of the vessel is placed .at $400,000. She was 
l)uilt at Glasgow during 1892 and was specially 
designed for the Hawaiian Island sugar trade. 
She had been a familiar figure in these waters 
for the past twenty-five years. For some time 
she was in the fleet operated by the Planters' 
Line from Atlantic Coast ports and return. 

The Wilson Shipbuilding Company of As- 
toria has the keels laid and two frames par- 
tially up for three of the largest wooden 
steamers ever built on the Columbia River. 
Fach of the vessels is to be 286'4 feet long, 
with forty-six-foot beam and a thirty-foot deptli 
of hold. The craft will register 3500 tons. The 
new vessels will go into the Federal merchant 
marine. This yard now employs 150 men and 
has a payroll of approximately $18,000 monthly. 

William Chisholm, formerly engineer in Pa- 
cific Mail ships and marine superintendent of 
the Pacific Mail, and in later years superin- 
tendent of the Southern Pacific ferryboats, has 
been appointed to the engineering department 
of the San Francisco offices of the P'ederal 
Shipping Board. Captain A. F. Pillsbury, Coast 
representative of the Shipping Board, had the 
appointment made in keeping with his policy 
of employing local men in the Board's busi- 
ness. 

Rail lumber shipments from Gray's Harbor for 
the three months ending September 1 totaled ap- 



proximately 301,830,000 feet and were moved in 
10,061 freight cars. This breaks all records for 
rail shipments for any three months prior in the 
harbor's history, and this despite the fact that a 
mill and camp strike has gripped the harbor 
during two of these three months. Water ship- 
ments for the same period amounted to about 
64,000,000 feet, thus making a total shipment of 
about 365,000,000 feet for the three months. 

United States District Lighthouse Inspector 
H. W. Rhodes issued announcements last week 
asking for bids on the recovery of lost buoy 
moorings along the coast of California. The 
announcement was made following Captain 
Whitclaw's offer to take the Government into 
partnership on this venture. The bids will be 
estimated upon the pounds of mooring chain 
and sinkers recovered and the Government will 
not take any risk on the undertaking. At the 
present prices of scrap metal, the lost moor- 
ings are worth close to $1000 each and there 
are at least fifty of them that might possibly be 
recovered. 

A tale of hardship and danger is unfolded in 
a suit filed in the Federal District Court at San 
Francisco against Libby, McNeil & Libby, by 
Francisco Diaz and seventeen fishermen on 
the bark "Standard," owned by the company. 
The -fishermen seek aggregate damages of $36,- 
000. According to the complaint, the fishermen 
shipped for a salmon voyage to Alaska on the 
"Standard." The master and first- and second- 
mates, it is charged, were intoxicated most of 
the time, and when the vessel sprung a leak 
and the men were forced to take to the boats 
were unal^le to describe their position, and took 
provisions consisting mostly of whisky. The life- 
boats were defective, according to the complaint, 
and the men lost their clothes and were suli- 
jected to exposure for two days before being 
rescued. 

Changes in the steamship "Nanking," for- 
merly the "Congress," now being made at a 
Sound shipyard will transform the big vessel 
into a transoceanic craft of up-to-date model. 
According to Captain N. E. Cousins, her for- 
mer commander, the ship has been made al- 
most completely over and is practically new. 
The China Mail Steamship Company, which 
purchased the "Nanking" from the old Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company, expects to dispatch 
her from this port to the Orient early in the 
new year. She will have space to accommo- 
date 120 first-class passengers, 100 second- 
class passengers and 636 Asiatic steerage pas- 
sengers. The "Nanking," when known as the 
"Congress," while on the way from San Fran- 
cisco to Puget Sound, took fire above Coos 
Bay and under great difficulty with decks burn- 
ing Captain Cousins put back into Coos Bay, 
where the liner dropped anchor and all the 
passengers and crew were landed in safety. 
Later the vessel was towed to Seattle. 

San Francisco has an opportunity not only to 
gain the establishment of a steamer line with 
several vessels plying regularly between San 
Francisco and Alaska, but also to wrest from 
Seattle a large part of the trade which followed 
the transfer of outgoing Alaskan mails to that 
city, according to Jesse W. Roberts, Superin- 
tendent of Railway Mail Service. This oppor- 
tunity, Roberts said, lies in the Government's 
recent publication of an advertisement for bids 
to carry mails between San Fancisco and 
Alaska. If San Francisco merchants are able to 
interest shipping men in the proposition and 
obtain satisfactory bids, Roberts said, the mail 
service would not even consider Seattle in the 
competition. "If San Francisco gives acceptable 
prices," he wrote to the Chamber of Commerce, 
"bids will not be asked for in Seattle." All 
mails for Alaska were at one time routed out of 
San Francisco. At that time local merchants 
held a large part of the trade with the north- 
ern territory. But later Seattle successfully ended 
a campaign for the outgoing mails, with tlic 
result that thirteen vessels are now regularly 
plying between Seattle and Alaskan ports. All 
these vessels carry mails. Mail routes from San 
Francisco to Skagway, Anchorage, Cordova and 
Nome will be established if San Francisco figures 
arc right, Roberts stated. "Postmaster Fay and 
myself have been working on this thing for 
two years," he said. "Recently, while I was in 
Washington, I got the department to agree to 
advertise for bids." 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Mercliants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sut- 
ter 5807. (Advt.) 

"Silas R. Axtell (attorney for Seamen's Unions 
in New York), formerly attorney for The Legal 
Aid Society, announces that he has opened an 
office for the practice of law and for the ex- 
clusive use of seamen. Consultation and advice 
free of charge. Suits under the La FoUette Act 
for half wages; actions for damages for injuries 
on account of accident, etc., given prompt atten- 
tion." (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 
FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JOHN BERG, Agent 

400^ Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHRODER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY 12 South Street 

Telephone 2107 Broad 

New York Branch 514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass 6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La 228 Lafayette Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 806 South Broadway 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 206 Moravian Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 231 Dock Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 220 Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass 168 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 54 Commercial Place 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 

Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Nintli Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

'telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 47 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, Mich 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAU I. SOMA RRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - J2.00 | Six months - . - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be tn by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Rusiness Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
S9 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOITRNAL. provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the p.Tper, and accompanied bv the writer's name 
.nnd address. The .IGT'RN.'Vrv is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1917. 



"SINK WITHOUT TRACE." 



Much has been said and more has been 
written anent the question, "Why are we 
at war with Germany?" 

President Wilson, in several state papers, 
uncqualcd for clarity of cx])rcssion, has 
surely made it perfectly clear why we arc 
at war with Germany. As time ,s;ocs on, 
however, additional wcis;;hty reasons arc 
coming to the surface. 

Revelations just made by Secretary Lans- 
ing show that the Swedish legation in 
Buenos Aires has been acting as the agent 
of Germany in sending information concern- 
ing Argentine ships at sea, and has sent mes- 
sages advising that certain ships be sunk 
so that no trace would remain of them. 
These messages, originally in the German 
language, bore the signature of the Ger- 
man charge, Count Luxburg. 

There may be some Americans who still 
entertain doubt about our country's justifi- 
cation to declare war upon Germany. But 
there surely will not be many when the full 
significance of that ghastly recommenda- 
tion to "sink without trace" is fully under- 
stood. 

Following are English translations of the 
German text: 

May 19, 1917, No. 32. This Government has 
now released German and Austrian ships in 
which hitherto a guard had been placed. In 
consequence of the settlement of the Monte 
CProtegido) case there has been a great change 
in public feeling. Government will in future 
only clear Argentine ships as far as Las Pal- 
mas. I beg that the small steamers "Gran" 
and "Guazo," thirty-first January (meaning 
which sailed thirty-first), 300 tons, which are 
(now) nearing Bordeaux with a view to chang- 
ing the flag, may be spared if possible, or else 
sunk without a trace being left "spurlos ver- 
senkt." (Signed) Lu.xburg. 

Another message read : 

July 19, 1917. No. 64. Without showing any 
tendency to make concessions, postpone reply 
to Argentine note until receipt of further re- 
ports. A change of ministry is probable. As 
regards .Argentine steamers, T recommend either 
compelling to turn back, sinking them without 



leaving any traces, or letting them through. 
They are all quite small. (Signed) Luxburg. 

The mind that can calinly perceive the 
results of the "sink without trace" policy is 
indeed beyond redemption. 

In the days of the buccaneers the mariner 
had at least an opportunity to defend him- 
self before being made "to walk the plank." 
But the seamen on these Argentine vessels 
were in the position of lambs led to slaugh- 
ter. By recommendation of a high German 
diplomatic official they were to be denied 
even the one last chance of surviving death 
by swimming. They were to be cruelly and 
cold-bloodedly murdered. 

To forever stop such brutal murder upon 
the high seas ; to re-establish a seinblance of 
man's humanity toward man of whatever 
color, creed or race, that surely is one good 
and sufficient reason (if others were lack- 
ing") for our country's entry in the war 
upon the German autocracy. 



"IT ALL DEPENDS ON—" 



What is sauce for the goose should be 
sauce for the gander! But it is not in San 
Francisco. The striking street carmen 
have expressed their willingness to submit 
all points of diflfcrcnce (except the right 
to organize) to arbitration. The company 
will neither consent to arbitration nor con- 
cede the men the right to organize. As 
usual, the boughten press has shrieked its 
hearty approval of the company's atti- 
tude. 

During the week the shipyard workers, 
employed in the big plants bordering on 
San Francisco bay went on strike for an 
increase in pay proportionate to the ever 
increasing cost of living. In this instance 
the companies are willing to arbitrate but 
the men refuse. 

Now note the results. 

The same miserable, lying i)ress tliat 
has applauded the Czar-like attitude of the 
traction company in its refusal to arbitrate 
is viciously condemning the shipyard work- 
ers for doing the same thing. 

Mr. Lilienthal, the President of the 
United Railroads, is pictured as a great 
and noble patriot because he defies the 
labor unions and refuses to arbitrate any- 
thing. 

The shipyard strikers, on the other hand, 
are called a lot of disloyal slackers, un- 
worthy of any consideration because, in 
so far as arbitration is concerned, they 
have followed in the footstejis of that 
pillar of society, Mr. Lilienthal. 

And this is the kind of bunk the sons 
of toil are expected to swallow, "honk, line 
and sinker !" 



FREE SCHOOLS FOR SEAMEN. 



The I'nited States Shipping Board has 
just issued a 22-page pamphlet giving de- 
tailed information to American sailors, fire- 
men, oilers and watertenders who wish to 
avail themselves of the free classes in navi- 
gation and marine engineering established 
in all the principal ports of the country. 

.\s is well known to readers of the Journai, 
the L'^nited States Shipping Board is creating 
a new National fleet of merchantmen, con- 
trolled by the United States Government. 

According to the pamphlet the Shipping 
Board needs for these ships 5,000 new deck 
officers and .^,000 new engineers. 

To fill these positions inen of proper ex- 



perience will be trained free of charge to 
lake examinations for Hcenses in either 
branch of the service. 

The Shipping Board is not basing its plans 
for the new Merchant Marine on war con- 
ditions. It is taking a look ahead, to a time 
when thousands of Ainerican seamen will 
be employed where there are now hundreds, 
and in permanent jobs. 

It is claimed that not less than 4,000,000 
tons of new shipping will go into commis- 
sion under the American flag in the next 
two years. The figures may be slightly ex- 
aggerated but there can be no denying that 
shipbuilding is expanding in this country 
as never before. It will continue to expand 
for years after the return of peace, as a 
result of orders now in sight. 

Applicants for admission to the free 
schools must be American citizens (either 
native or naturalized) not less than 19 years 
old. 

They must be in good health and must be 
able to read English readily, and to do ordi- 
nary figuring correctly. 

For a deck officer's berth applicants must 
pass an examination by a surgeon of the 
United States Public Health Service, as to 
"color sense and visual acuity," — that is, to 
.show whether they have color blindness and 
a proper range of vision. Fireinen, oilers 
and watertenders must show that they are 
able to hear bell signals under all norinal 
conditions. 

The schools are not for landsmen. No 
man without two years' seagoing experience 
or its equivalent will be taken into a Free 
Government School. 

Men experienced in seafaring or engineer- 
ing, who may have been at sea in earlier 
life, and want to come back, are eligible to 
enter the schools. 

Under the rules of the United States 
Steamboat-Inspection Service, which govern 
the admission of students to the Free Gov- 
ernment Training Schools, applicants fall 
into two classes, as follows: 

Those who have had two years' sea service. 

Those who have not had two years' sea serv- 
ice, but have had sufficient equivalent service 
to enter. 

Full details as to the exact sea service 
requirements may be obtained by a perusal 
of the pamphlet issued by the Shipping 
Board, or upon application to any United 
States Steamboat Inspector. The Rules and 
Regulations of the Steamboat-Inspection 
Service have been materially modified and 
copies of these amendments may be ob- 
tained from the offices of the nearest Board 
of Inspectors. 

Seamen entering the Free Government 
Schools are not paid while studying ashore, 
and are expected to find themselves. There 
is, however, no expense to the student for 
tuition, books or instruments. 

The ordinary school term in a navigation 
school is six weeks. In an engineering 
school the term is four weeks. At the end 
of his school term, the student, on passing 
his examinations for a license, must, if se- 
lected, ship on an ocean-going steam vessel 
for special sea training as an extra junior 
officer, for a period not to exceed two 
months, at $75 a month. 

To date, the United States Shipping 
Board has established Free Navigation 
Schools at the following seaboard ports: 

Mobile, Alabama; San Diego, San Pedro and 
San Francisco, California; Jacksonville, Honda: 
Savannah. Georgia; New Orleans. Loiiisiana; 
Machias, Rockland, Boothbay Harbor and Port- 
land Maine; Baltimore and Cnsfield, Maryland; 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge (2), New Bedford and Provincetown, 
Massachusetts; Atlantic City and Cape May, 
New Jersey; Portland and Astoria, Oregon; 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Providence, Rhode 
Island; Charleston, South Carolina; Galveston, 
Texas; Norfolk, Virginia; Taconia, Washington. 

On the Great Lakes Free Navigation 
Schools have been established in the follow- 
ing cities : 

Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago and Duluth. 

The Board has also established eight Free 

Engineering Schools, at the following places: 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.; 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; Armour Institute of Technology, 
Chicago, 111.; Case School of Applied Science, 
Cleveland,.©.; Stevens Institute of Technology, 
Hoboken, N. J.; The Tulane University of 
Louisiana, New Orleans, La.; The Bourse, Phil- 
adelphia, Penn.; LIniversity of Washington, 
Seattle, Wash. 

For any further information prospective 
applicants for enrollment should go direct to 
the Instructor at the school nearest to their 
home, or their home port ; or apply to the 
Local Inspector of Steam Vessels at any 
American port. If it is not convenient to do 
either, write a letter to Henry Howard, 
Director of Recruiting, U. S. Shipping 
Board, Boston, Mass. 

In writing him state your age, whether an 
American citizen, what grade you wish to 
study for, and what your experience has 
been. You will then be informed whether 
or not you are fitted by experience to enter 
a Free Government School, and if so, where 
to apply for admission. 



IN THE LAND OF "NO STRIKES" 



Another terrific industrial struggle com- 
menced in Australia, "the land of no 
strikes," on August 2. From reports at 
hand it appears that some 60,000 men went 
on strike against the introduction of the 
"American speed-up system" in the Gov- 
ernment-owned railway workshoiis of New 
South Wales. 

The "Australian Worker" of August '', 

])uts it this way: 

In the United States, owing to tlic introduc- 
tion of the Taylor Card System, a working man 
is "scrapped" at 40 years of age. The speeding 
up that results from this pernicious system 
wrecks his physique, dulls his brain, and breaks 
his spirit and heart. It is this sanie system 
that the anti-Labor and anti-trade union Gov- 
ernment wishes to introduce in the railway 
workshops of New South Wales. The workers 
refused to he sent along the same Calvary road 
that is now being trod by their less fortunate 
American brothers, and struck work as a pro- 
test against this infamous system of industrial 
Prussianism. 

TVior to calling of the strike the men 
had agreed that if the Commissioners in 
charge of the state-owned railway system 
would suspend the obnoxious card system 
for a week, and during that period have it 
investigated by an independent tribunal, 
they would give an undertaking to abide 
by that tribunal's decision. But the Gov- 
ernment officials refused "to consider such 
an oficr for a moment." 

Only meager details of the great struggle 
are at hand. Yet, the fact that the Aus- 
tralian workers have again struck "en 
masse" should be sufficient evidence for 
some of our own "can't-strike-law" cham- 
pions that strikes cannot be prevented by 
long-winded statutory enactments. 



A sentinel that always stands on duty in 
the labor movement is the union label, and 
to win victories it is but necessary to take 
advantage of its watchfulness. Demand the 
union label on your purchases and in a short 
time your troubles will be few. It is up to 
you. 



EVOLVING BANTAMS FROM MEN. 



Andrew Furuseth's Labor Day Message Deals 

With the Penalty Which Follows a 

Violation of Nature's Laws. 



Labor Day is the day specifically set aside 
for and dedicated to the better understanding 
of labor — of its importance to humanity; its 
fundamental necessity; that it must be honored 
and practiced in order that humanity may live. 
Life demands labor — healthy, natural labor, suit- 
able to age and sex. All our hopes, all our 
struggles must be directed toward producing 
conditions which shall make such labor possible. 
Labor Day emphasizes this necessity anew. 

There can be no real life without labor. Men 
or animals who shun labor become parasites. 
They remain undeveloped, incomplete, helpless. 
When deprived of their filched sustenance they 
perish. Labor is indispensable to the health 
and development not only of the individual, but 
of the race. Where life is easy, development is 
either arrested or very slow. Deformity of 
body or mind frequently results from labor 
power unused, misdirected or overstrained. 
Labor power must be used. Tliere must be 
effort and activity or the faculties decay; but it 
must be natural activity, such as will preserve 
and further develop body and mind. Activity 
of this character is possible only to frecdoni. 

Huntsman's Life Produced Strong Race. 

The so-called historical period of humanity 
has apparently failed to further the evolution 
of man. His body is no stronger, more supple 
or enduring than at its beginning. His senses, 
there are excellent reasons for believing, have 
decayed rather tlian developed. We are told 
that Kuropeans of tlie stone age were at least 
our equals in physical development, and that 
their heads contained a brain at least equal to 
ours in weight. These people lived and had 
developed by hunting. 

There is no life so free as that ot the hunter 
— free to follow impulse, to struggle, to move 
about, to measure strength and wit against 
obstacles of all kinds. Only those of the 
greatest courage, endurance and skill survive; 
the deficient die early and leave few offspring. 
The hunting period was the development period 
of humanity. The hunt furnished all the condi- 
tions essential to development. It necessarily 
developed keenness of judgment and caution, 
strength of muscle and swiftness of motion, 
because upon those qualities life depended. It 
was a life which set its indclibie mark upon 
man, for man is a hunter still, though he stalks 
a different game. 

Man Provided the Home; Woman Kept It. 

The male trailed tlic game and finally brought 
it home. Cave or hut, it was still his home. 
For it he hunted; in defense of it he fought and 
died. He provided for the women and children 
and defended them. That was his labor. Tlie 
woman was, first of all, a mother to her 
children. She fed them from her breast in in- 
fancy; she prepared food from the game brought 
home — food, and to some extent clothing for 
herself, the children and the man. The chil- 
dren, in play, learned the labor which was later 
to be theirs. There was an honest division 
of labor, each doing that for which nature best 
fitted them. Thus they labored and lived and 
developed, and from this free life has come 
all that humanity really is or has in physical 
perfection and mental endowment. Man may 
have learned many new ways of using his 
faculties, but the faculties are the same. There 
is polish, but it brightens the same metal. 

In the early period of agricultural develop- 
ment, while freedom remained, wliile the work- 
was diversified and in the open, man retained 
his vigor of body and mind and lost none of his 
strength. He managed to preserve his stature 
and strength even during the period of serfdom. 
It was commonly admitted that none but an 
Englishman could bend the bow of an English- 
man. 

Artificial Light Destroys Life Balance. 

The male was still the provider for the fami- 
ly. The female was still first of all the mother, 
second, the preparer of food and clothing. Wliile 
the man's work was in the open and diversified, 
and the woman's work was in the home, where 
she could rest when necessary and pass from 
one task to another — in itself a rest — the race 
kept fairly healthy. The hours were long and 
the labor exhausting in the summer, in seed 
and harvest time, but the hours of labor in the 
winter were short and brought recuperation. 

This balance between labor and rest was 
maintained until cheap artificial light was in- 
vented. With artificial light and machine manu- 
facture humanity entered the present. Now the 
male has very largely ceased to be the sole 
provider for the home. We now have the 
family wage. Man cannot, with all his hours 
of labor, earn sufficient to take care of a 
family. Marriages are becoming less numerous 
and are entered into later in life, very often 
not at all. Promiscuity, abandoned early in the 
hunting period, and pairing marriages, aban- 
doned at the close of barbarism as unhealthy 
and destructive of life, are returning. 

Boys and girls who should be in school and 
on the playground, or in pride and play hclp- 
(Continued on Page 10.) 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



lleadtiuarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 11, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 p. 
m., K. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair, more men coming around 
the hall. Inill shipwreck benefit was awarded to 
5 members of the crew of the ship "Standard." 
Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 17, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 p. 
m., Joe Faltus presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping fair. A number of Alaska fishing ves- 
sels arrived in port during the week. It was 
decided to send three delegates to the twenty- 
first annual convention of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America, to be held at Buffalo, 
N. Y., next December. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. ^ 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 11, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

WILLIAM HASTINGS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 11, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 11, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 11, 1917. 
Slii])piiig medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 11, 1917. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 11, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects good. 
JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88;/^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. II, 1917. 
Sliipping good; men scarce. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 11, 1917. 
Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 4, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping good. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



IIead(juarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 13, 1917. 

Tlie regular weekly meeting was called to or- 
der at 7 p. m., luigene I'.urkc in the chair. Sec- 
retary reported shipping good. Nominated 
delegate to the California State I'ederation oi 
Labor convention. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 6, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 5, 1917. 
No meeting. Sliipjiing .good; few men idle; 
hard to obtain for offsliore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128j^ 6th St. Phone Home 
115, Sunset 335. 



Portland .'\gency. Sept. 10, 1917. 
No meeting No men ashore. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



DIED. 

Oscar Amundsen, No. I.i94, a nati\-e of Nor- 
way, age 40, drowned from the steam-schooner 
"Cleone," off Pigeon Point, Sept. 6, 1917. 

I-'ritz Johnson, No. 1110, a native of Sweden, 
age 42, died at San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 6, 
1917. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



Government control and operation of all 
industries in which the private employers 
fail to come to a harmonious understand- 
ing with nrganizcl labor is one of the out- 
standing |)r()posals in the program adopted 
at Minneapolis by the American Alliance 
for Labor and Democracy. 

Another important demand is that for 
direct representation of organized labor in 
all of the boards and committees and ef- 
fective subdivisions of authority in the 
management of the industries and of the 
war and peace policies of the nation. 

While the Alliance is unofficial, so far 
as the labor movement is concerned, its 
program will doubtless be brought to the 
Buffalo convention of the American Feder- 
aton of Labor for endorsement there. 
Government operation of the great indus- 
tries, and democratic representation of la- 
bor in their management, are doctrines 
which thus far have had only the minority 
backing. It is possible — indeed, it is 
probable — that this year they will be 
adopted with scarcely a dissenting vote. So 
far has six months of war brought the 
l)ublic o]>ini()n of American wage workers 
around. 

One of the immediate results of the 
showing of American loyalty made by Mr. 
Gompers and his associates at Minneapolis 
may be the strengthening of the inclination 
of President Wilson to take hold of the 
copper mining tangle and straighten it out. 
Both in Arizona and in Montana the issue 
is the companies against unionism. In 
both cases the presence of a few of the 
I. W. W., due to the aggressions by the 
companies, was made the pretext for a 
claim that the I. W. W. had caused the 
strikes and were running them. The sin- 
cerity of this charge may be tested by the 
fact that in .Arizona all union men arc 
being deported by the Loyalty Leagues, 
while in Montana the Anaconda Copper 
Mining Company refuses to deal with any 
union under any conditions, nor to abolish 
the "rustling card" which guarantees that 
the applicant for work is non-union. 

^liss Rankin, Congresswoman from 
Montana, is just back from a visit to 
Butte, where 10,000 of the striking copper 
miners met her at the train, and 16,000 
heard her speech of encouragement for 
their fight. She says that the men will 
never be beaten — that if some of them get 
so hungry that they are forced back into 
the mines this winter, they will come out 
next spring with a still greater determi- 
nation to get the union re-established. She 
says that the miners, to a man, endorse 
the proposal that the Government must 
own and operate the metal mines in order 
to bring industrial peace. 

Robert G. Rigg, Secretary of the Globe 
Miners' Union, is visiting locals of the 
United Mine Workers in Illinois, this 
month, asking funds with which to defend 
the forty-two members of his union who 
are under arrest for "rioting" while legally 
and peacefully ])icketing the Old Dominion 
mine at Globe. Meanwhile, 10,000 strikers 
from the copper mines in Arizona are get- 
ting hungry, and need help. 

President Wilson has delayed for some 
weeks the naming of the committee to 
visit .Arizona and Montana and report on 
these strikes, but it is understood that he 



will name the men by the middle of this 
month. Their investigation and report will 
have much to do with the determination of 
the fate of the mines — their future opera- 
tion by private owners or by Uncle Sam. 
* * * 

J. ;\. Taylor of Seattle and Portland, re])- 
rescnting the Machinists; Dan P. McKillop 
of Seattle, rei)rcsenting the Boilermakers, 
and George Sanfarcon of San Francisco, 
representing the Carpenters, arrived in 
Washington recently as spokesmen of the 
crafts employed in shipyards along the 
Pacific Coast from San Francisco to Se- 
attle, in the attempt to adjust their wage 
scale and prevent discrimination against 
union membership. They have already 
been in conference with the national ad- 
justment board for the shipyards, consist- 
ing of V. Everit Macy, representing the 
Government; Alfred J. Berres, Secretary 
of the Metal Trades Department of the 
American Federation of Labor, and Mr. 
Carry of Chicago, representing the em- 
ployers. Vice-Chairman Stevens of the 
Shipping Board was also there. 

The dispute involves about 100,000 men, 
all of them union members. It was be- 
cause these men had taken a vote to 
strike, and were to have gone out on 
August 14, that the "labor treaty" cover- 
ing all work in shipyards during the war, 
was hastened to signature by the Shipping 
Board. The members of the national ad- 
justment board for this industry realize, 
and the heads of the international unions 
also believe, that the extension of the field 
of agreements between organized labor and 
the Government, during the war, will de- 
pend on how well the board can dispose 
of this first big case. 

No immediate decision is expected. The 
board is informally meeting to hear the 
side of the crafts in the yards. It will also 
hear the side of the em])loyers. It will 
then hear from tlie Shipping Board as to 
the public interest involved. .After some 
discussion it will hold a formal meeting 
and try to reach a decision as to what 
conditions and what rates of pay shall 
be maintained in the industry. 

Similar hearings have been given the 
representatives of the 12.000 strikers and 
their former employers in the shipyards 
along the New York waterfront, and the 
ship fitters and riveters from a shipyard 
at Wilmington. Del., who have been on 
strike for three weeks jiast. Decisions have 

not yet been made. 

* * * 

Once more the Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion has given an unfavorable reply to the 
request of the Departments of Labor and 
Commerce that they reach a settlement 
with organized seamen and licensed of- 
ficers on the Lakes. At a conference held 
here on September 6 President Livingston 
of the Lake Carriers, and Harvey Goulden. 
their attorney, insisted that they would 
"not permit any strangers to come aboard 
their vessels," and that they "oppose col- 
lective bargaining." 

The Government's plea that they "do 
their bit" to increase the nation's supply 
of trained seamen ready to go upon the 
vessels now building for the emergency 
fleet, was met by the claim that they could 
furnish non-union men from their present 
supply, if necessary. 

This seems to close the door of hope 
for any change of heart in the policy of 



the Lake Carriers, who are dominated by 
the L^nited States Steel Corporation. Fed- 
eral mediators are looking for possible de- 
velopments toward a strike. 
* * * 

Appeal has been made to the Labor De- 
jiartment by the Secretary of the Pan- 
American Federation of Labor Committee, 
for inquiry into the deportation of twenty- 
two Mexican laborers from California to 
Mexico, on August 27, because they were 
suspected of being labor agitators. They 
had been imported to work in the beet 
fields only, and their employers are re- 
ported to have shipped them back like so 
many cattle, at the whim of these anti- 
union employers. 

Secretary of Labor Wilson is beginning 
his annual struggle to get sufficient money 
to develop the bureaus of his department 
to meet immediate needs. He is having 
his usual ill-luck with Chairman Fitzgerald 
of the House Committee on Appropriations. 
The report of the hearings given by the 
committee, during the summer, to the 
heads of departments asking for items in 
the big appropriation bill that is now 
before the House has just been made pub- 
lic. It shows that Secretary Wilson is 
asking for $750,000 for a national employ- 
ment service, and $150,000 for commission- 
ers of conciliation. 

The work of the conciliators during the 
jiast year has been remarkably effective. 
It is to be credited with the settlement, 
on terms satisfactory to the men, of scores 
of important disputes. One in Central 
Pennsylvania, involving 75,000 coal miners, 
and one in Alabama, involving 30,000 coal 
miners, may be credited chiefly to the 
Secretary, as direct spokesman for this 
conciliation service. There was also set- 
tled the dispute of 40,000 shopmen with 
the southeastern railways, and the strike in 
the fishing industry at Gloucester, Mass. 
These are hut a few of the prominent 
ones. 

Whether the employment service will be 
given sufficient funds this year is doubtful. 
Labor is scarce now, and your average 
CongressYiian will argue that it is useless 
to spend money on hunting jobs for men 
when employers are fairly ready to kidnaj) 
them to get them to work. Later, when 
labor is plenty, they will argue that the 
Government "can't make work." 

Secretary Wilson admitted in July that 
his conciliation commissioners had been 
unable to settle the troubles in Butte and 
in Arizona, but he was still hopeful that 
they might succeed. 



WHY WOMEN DON'T FIGHT. 



\\'hat did American women win in the 
revolutionary war? The right of American 
men to choose their government. 

What did American women win in the 
war of 1812? The right of men to trade 
as they chose. 

What did American women win in the 
Civil War? The right of negro men to 
vote. 

What are American women going to win 
in the great war? Child labor, long hours, 
scant food, high prices, lowered standard of 
living, loss of constitutional guaranties of 
freedom, martial law, syphilis, infant mor- 
tality, bereavement, and desolation. — Four 
Lights. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



I. W. W.S VS. STRAIGHT UNIONISM. 

(By Jay Fox.) 



"Listen," said the dub. "Last week you 
didn't give me a look-in on the I. W. W. 
talk. You seem to be chuck full of it, so 
I want you to answer a question. If you 
don't mind, enlighten me a little more on 
the subject. You said the I. W. W. is a 
mistake, a disaster, that it never should 
have happened and all that ; and while 
you were spielin' this question came to my 
mind. After all, ain't they soldiers in the 
army of Labor, fighting in the Labor war, 
and if so why don't you recognize them as 
allies?" 

"Your question is a good one," said the 
union man. "It is the first time it has 
been sprung on me. I am very glad you 
asked it, because in answering it I hope to 
be able to clear up a lot of sentimental rub- 
bish that has gathered around the subject 
of the I. W. W. these years back, with 
reference to its place in the labor world. 

"In the first place, the I. W. W. is not 
a part of the army of Labor, no more than 
Villa's followers are part of the regular 
army of Mexico. Like Villa, the I. W. W. 
repudiated the regular army and turned 
all its guns upon its former comrades-in- 
arms. Far from being a part of the army 
of Labor, the I. W. W. was organized on 
the theory that the army of Labor should 
be put out of commission, and it is working 
on that theory yet. Its aim is to re])lacc 
the regular army of Labor, and it stoutly 
maintains, all evidence to the contrary, that 
no progress can be made until the I. W. 
W., by its conquering forces, shall have 
reduced the regular army of Labor to 
vassalage. 

"And if we were to view the question in 
the broader sense and say: 'Well, suppose 
all this is true, why not forget that those 
who started the I. \V. ^V. were mistaken 
and buckle up to the work of routing the 
common enemy by mutually supporting 
each other in the fight?' The answer to 
the question put in that most liberal light 
is simply this: The I. W. W. has chosen 
to depart most radically from the methods 
pursued by the regular army and pursues 
a line of tactics that only indirectly inter- 
ests Labor on its economic side. 

"Their so-called speech fights are not 
direct Labor fights. Free speech fights are 
more of the nature of political contests. 
And, while organized Labor wants to see 
the fullest liberty of speech, it contends 
the victories of free speech are not of the 
first importance to Labor and therefore 
Labor would better conserve its energies 
and concentrate its forces on the economic 
field than to dissipate its powers trying 
conclusions with the enemy on less im- 
portant issues. 

"While it denounces politics and i)olitical 
action most vehemently, the I. W. W. is 
itself a quasi-political organization. It dif- 
fers from other political bodies in the 
means more than in the ends. It uses so- 
called direct action instead of the ballot 
box. ]\Iost of its big fights have been with 
the political authorities, on the political 
field, without any economic significance to 
the working class. 

"The Spokane Free Speech fight placed 
the I. W. W. on the map as a direct action 
political body, and it has upheld that 
reputation in dozens of contests of like 
character down to the recent Everett afifair 



in which five of its members were killed 
and several crippled. 

"Let me review briefly the Everett fight, 
it will illustrate my point and bring out 
more clearly than any mere abstract argu- 
ment the reason why the I. W. W. is not 
a part of the Labor army and cannot be so 
regarded. 

"The shingle weavers of Everett were 
on strike. The I. W. W., considering that 
a desirable time to spread its propaganda, 
sent speakers from Seattle and began hold- 
ing meetings on the principal street corner 
of Everett. The city passed a law pro- 
hibiting speaking within a block of the 
main street. The I. W. W. ignored the 
law, were arrested and some of them 
handled roughly. 

"One afternoon about forty, arriving by 
boat, were met at the dock by the sheriff 
and gimmen, who took them to the city 
limits, beat them up and turned them loose. 
Then they declared a free speech fight 
against Everett ; called for volunteers and 
advertised a meeting at the forbidden corner. 
This was done in Seattle, from which place 
about 300 took the regular boat on the day 
appointed. The sherifif and gunmen with 
rifles met the boat and ordered them not to 
land. Shooting started with above re- 
sults; also two of the gunmen were killed. 

"Seventy-four were arrested, charged with 
killing the two cops. After a long and 
expensive trial, a verdict of not guilty was 
returned and the whole thing was over. 

"What did all that have to do with the 
strike of the shingle weavers? Absolutely 
nothing. What problem of economics was 
involved? None. For the I. W. W. it 
was a sacred political problem of free 
speech. For the shingle weavers it meant 
nothing. They didn't want to speak from 
the street corner. And if speaking from 
these corners would have helped their eco- 
nomic cause they would have found it out 
during the fifteen years they have been 
organized. 

"Still the weavers came to the aid of 
the I. W. W., as did the entire labor move 
ment of the West, and made a common 
cause of the defense of the I. W. W. ar- 
rested. After the trial was over the 
labor unions promptly repudiated the I. W 
W. as an unnecessary, interloping organiza- 
tion and warned the unorganized against it. 

"The labor movement don't want to be 
involved in disputes of the above char- 
acter. They are economic unions and wise- 
ly wish to direct all their energies on the 
economic problem. The right to stand on a 
street corner and tell an indififerent crowd 
how a union ought to be organized is not 
of nearly so much importance as the right 
to picket a strike of a union already or- 
ganized on the job, 

"Strikes are not won by peddling pam- 
phlets on downtown street corners. The big 
issue before Labor today is not the right 
to speak on particular street corners, but 
the right to eat, and organized Labor is 
buckled up to the task of making that 
right secure for all times; and if these very 
well-intentioned workers who compose the 
I. W. W. will quit their foolishness and 
come back we will welcome them. But 
recognize that organization as an ally, 
never !" 



Notice to Seamen 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

Labor's Economic Platform 



Those parents who are forced to depend 
for support upon their children do not nec- 
essarily love them the more on that account. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



U. S. CREWS FOR U. S. SHIPS. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



present Secretary Redfield. (Loud applause). 

Address by the Secretary of Commerce. 

Secretary Redfield: Mr. Chairman and gen- 
tlemen, I took part in the calling of this con- 
ference for two reasons, or, rather, three rea- 
sons — future reasons, and present reasons — 
and the latter because it directly affects the 
work of tiie Department of Commerce. I am 
not very greatly interested in indirect discus- 
sion, but the practical fact that this week we 
are laying up three ships upon the Pacific 
Coast because we cannot get men to run them 
interests me. Three vessels of the Coast Sur- 
vey have been ordered laid up because wc 
cannot get men to operate them. Now, when 
I say we cannot get men to operate them, 
perhaps I should qualify it, because what I 
am very anxious to do is to make the exact 
facts very plain. We have succeeded up to 
this summer in getting men who will stay 
for a few days, but we have not been able 
to get any assurances at all, at any price, of 
a crew that would work so that we could 
keep the vessels moving, and we have, there- 
fore, laid them up. That is one set of facts 
that we face to-day. It is a fact that the ships 
are idle. Another fact that I have in mind 
is that we sent a vessel to sea at Norfolk a 
few months ago. I am not prepared to say 
how many different crews she had had, but I 
can say that although the men were willing 
to do all they could, the vessel had to put 
back because, within six hours, some of the 
men if not all of them, were so desperately 
seasick that the ship could not be operated. 

The Commissioner of Lighthouses is here 
and is ready to give the actual reports from 
the diflfercnt lighthouse districts concerning the 
constant difficulties wc are having in securing 
qualified seamen even at the greatly advanced 
wages we are willing to pay in order to keep 
these vessels in motion. We have been unable 
to do so. 

We have four maritime services. One of 
them is a very small one in that respect, and 
in every one we arc facing the same prob- 
lem—inability to get men to keep the ves- 
sels moving. 

Speaking of the other side of that problem, 
as to how to get men, I need hardly speak 
of the efforts which the Shipping Board is 
making through nautical schools. 

I think you know that the Steamboat In- 
spection Service has, at my instance and with 
my approval, modified the requirements, so as 
to afford more rapid promotion to the higher 
grades than has been possible heretofore. We 
are quite ready to meet seamen or officers in 
frank and helpful discussions in regard to mat- 
ters that relate to advancing them more 
rapidly and making opportunities more largely 
for them. 

The whole question, gentlemen, it seems to 
me, has to be considered from the point of 
view of a condition which never faced this 
country before, and in which the lessons of 
the past cannot be used altogether for the 
future. We are facing an evolution in our 
maritime life. 

I am not going to impose my views upon 
you further than to say that the officers of 
our maritime service will be here ready at 
any time to answer questions and give state- 
ments and reasons. 

General Uhler is not able to be here this 
morning. If he is wanted, he will be here 
this afternoon or to-morrow. 

At this time I want to point to one case. 
Perhaps I should not reason from it, and yet 
I am inclined to believe it speaks a truth 
which will, in some measure, and in so far as 
it is pos'sible of hearing, have to be heard. 

We have a new vessel of our department 
lying at a dock in W^ashington. On that ves- 
sel every man has his own iron bunk in a 
room just as wide as the ship, and it is quite 
separate from the quarters in which he eats. 
The men have a dining room and a mess room 
entirely separate and apart from the place in 
which they sleep. Every man has his own 
personal full-sized metal locker for his clothes, 
and a bath is provided for the seamen and a 
separate bath for the petty officers who have 
their own mess room, as well as the other 
officers. In other words, in this vessel which 
is intended to keep to sea for three or four 
months at a time there has been a distinct 
effort made to give to every man the right 
of privacy in his own life on board that ship. 
His sleeping quarters are detached from his 
eating quarters, so that he may have a sense 
of freedom on board the ship. 

I noticed, a few days ago. when the ship 
was in motion, that although it was a pleasant 
day most of the men were not upon the deck. 
I found them more comfortably located in the 
rooms where they could live, rooms separate 
and distinct from their sleeping quarters, and 
where they could, by choice, engage in per- 
sonal tasks without falling over each other, 
and have abundant light and air. We have 
had no difficulty as yet, I think, in obtain- 
ing crews for that ship. I think we have 
had none. 

The chance of getting these men into the 
naval service, and the type of men who are 



ready to go may be gathered from the fact 
that I believe all the petty officers in this 
particular case voluntarily enrolled, and are 
ready to go with their ship into the service 
of the country. I do not offer that as a so- 
lution of this problem. After all is said, this 
is really a human problem. The problem of 
ship officers, and the problem of ship sailors, 
is, in my judgment, first a human problem. 
You must approach it from the human side. 
Further than that, we must continue to ap- 
proach it from the human side, if we are go- 
ing to work it out properly. I do not think 
that means necessarily that we can accomplish 
it in one month, six months, or six years, but 
that is the line of approach, the line from 
which there should be no retreat. That prob- 
lem seems to me to be worthy of the effort. 

Now, we are building in this country some- 
thing like 700 ships at this minute, not count- 
ing, I think, the ships which the Shipping 
Board is about to undertake to build. They 
are going to ask for a very much larger num- 
ber of ships than we have ever seen in any 
fleet which we have had in this country; and 
it is in view of this coming fleet that we 
have asked you to come here this_ morning. 

I thank you for your kind attention. (Loud 
applause). 

(To be continued.) 



SPREADING DEMOCRACY. 

(By Scott Nearing.) 



r.cforc the United States entered the 
world war, the Minimum Wage Commis- 
sion of IMassachusetts made an investiga- 
tion into the wages of women employed in 
hotels and restaurants and in the manu- 
facture of rain coats, men's shirts, overalls, 
neckwear, suspenders and other elastic 
goods, and women's muslin underwear, 
petticoats, aprons, kimonos and neckwear. 
The results of this study prove beyond 
any shadow of doubt that all of the 
despotism and oppression in the world is 
not to be found in Germany and Austria. 

The wages of these women workers were 
studied during the year 1916 — a year of 
very high prices. Four years before, when 
prices were fully 50 per cent, less than they 
were in 1916 this same Commission decided 
that the least that a girl could exist on in 
the cities of Massachusetts was $8 plus a 
week. The same figures w-ould put the 
limit at not less than $10 in 1916. Let 
that pass for the moment, and note some 
of the facts discovered by the Commission. 

There were women in Massachusetts, 
working in the factories during 1916 whose 
average weekly wages were less than $5 a 
week ! 

Take one illustration, — the manufacture 
of men's clothing. There were 1132 women 
engaged in the work on men's clothing. Of 
these women 43 received average weekly 
wages of less than $3 a week ; 67 were in 
receipt of $3 but not over $4, and 152 were 
getting $4 but under $5. In other words, 
262 women — one quarter of all the women 
covered by the study, were receeiving less 
than $5 a week. 

Among these 1132 women, only 258 (one 
quarter) were receiving average weekly 
wages of more than $8 a week. Eight 
dollars a week is no longer a living wage 
for women in the cities of Massachusetts. 

Some of the other industries were even 
worse than men's clothing. Four-fifths of 
the women who were working on muslin 
underwear were receiving less than $8 a 
week. On aprons and kimonos there were 
84.7 per cent., and on women's neckwear 
87.6 per cent, of the women receiving less 
than $8. 

Democracy? Democracy for the Ger- 
mans! 

For the working women of Massachusetts 
— thousands of them — underpay, misery, 
want and shame. 
America ! America ! 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



generally proves to be more effective. 
The worker, however, does not wish to 
be compelled to resort to the strike. He 
wants legislation made simple and effec- 
tive, so as to compel every industry to 
pay a living wage and provide decent 
working conditions." 



Unionists to Ignore "Can't-Strike" Law. 

A flag of defiance was raised against 
Colorado's "can't-strike" law by the con- 
vention of the Colorado State Federation 
of Labor, which called on affiliates to ig- 
nore the State Industrial Relations Com- 
mission. This law is similar to the In- 
dustrial Disputes act of Canada, except 
that it applies to all classes of workers, 
who are prohibited from striking before 
they submit their grievances to the com- 
mission and for 30 days thereafter. 

This denial of the right to quit their 
employment has been bitterly contested 
by Colorado organized workers and in 
Denver many unions make no pretense of 
obeying this section which is referred to 
as "involuntary servitude." This view- 
point was accepted by the State conven- 
tion, which adopted the following: 

"Whereas, The Industrial Relations Com- 
mission of Colorado abridges the consti- 
tutional rights guaranteed by the Constitu- 
tion of the United States; and 

"Whereas, No one knows better than 
the commission itself that there is no 
court which would uphold the law; and 

"Whereas, We believe the people direct- 
ly connected in labor disputes are better 
able to handle the affairs of their partic- 
ular crafts than is a commission which 
may have no knowledge whatever of the 
matter they would pass upon ; therefore, 
be it 

"Resolved, That the Colorado state fed- 

"Resolved, That the Colorado State Fed- 
eration of Labor encourage all local unions 
to absolutely ignore the Industrial Rela- 
tions Commission of Colorado in the set- 



EVOLVING BANTAMS FROM MEN. 
(Continued from Page' 7.) 



ing father or mother with their work, are 
sent into the factory, where the boy is stunted 
tending a machine and the girl is robbed, first, 
of that girlishness of mind that later makes 
the real woman, then of the physical develop- 
ment and strength that alone can make a 
vigorous mother. She is compelled by condi- 
tions to continue in the factory until married, 
and then still oji and on until she becomes a 
mother, often remaining, doing the same thing 
over and over, while every bone and muscle is 
aching from fatigue, until taken with "labor 
pains." 

Before she has recovered her strength we 
send the mother back to the factory and her 
child to a day nursery, where it sucks cow's 
milk from a bottle. The mother becomes ill 
because she cannot give the child its natural 
food; without it, the child sickens or dies. 
This process is repeated over and over until 
the race is crippled and healthy human life 
threatens to become nonexistent. 

Men Once Stalwarts Now "Bantams." 

The English were the first people to he driven 
into this life. They were five feet nine, with 
forty-five inch chests, when their factory life 
began. In the factory districts they arc now 
more often five feet two, with thirty-five inch 
chests. They are given the hideously descriptive 
name of bantams, and are organized into ban- 
tam battalions and sent to defend the factories 
which, by reversing the processes of evolution, 
robbed them of the health, strength and stamina 
which were theirs by divine right. 

And still we turn deaf ears to the lessons 
taught by science, by experience, by religion. 
And still the deforming, life-destroying business 
goes merrily on. And the end is not yet. For 
we cannot persistently violate Nature's laws and 
remain in health. We cannot persistently com- 
pel woman to live an unnatural life and have 
a healthy people. Woman is the race. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



NO ENEMIES. 

(By Chas. Mackay.) 



You have no enemies, you say? 

Alas, my friend, the boast is poor; 
He who has mingled in the fray 

Of duty, that the brave endure, 
Must have made foes! If you have none, 
Small is the work that you have done. 

You've hit no traitor on the hip, 

You've dashed no cup from perjured lip, 

You've never turned the wrong to right, 

You've been a coward in the fight. 



CONVENTION CALL. 

International Seamen's Union of America. 



To all Unions of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America, Greeting: 

The Twenty-first Annual Convention of 
the International Seamen's Union of Amer- 
ica will convene in Buffalo, N. Y., Monday, 
December 3, 1917, at 10 a. m., and will 
continue in session from day to day until 
its business is completed. All District 
Unions are urged to be fully represented. 

There are many grave questions of press- 
ing importance to the seamen of our coun- 
try which must be considered and acted 
upon and each District Union should be 
represented by its most able, experienced 
and faithful members in order that the 
best recommendations and actions from 
the Convention may be decided upon and 
brought before the membership for en- 
dorsement. To accomplish this, each dis- 
trict union should send its full quota of 
delegates and economy should not be a 
hindrance to bring this about. 
Representation. 

The following sections of the Constitu- 
tion of the Internationa] Seamen's Union 
of America govern representation at the 
Convention : 

Article III, Section LL. Representation 
at the Convention shall be based upon the 
average Per Capita Tax paid during the 
year. Organizations shall be entitled to 
one delegate for two hundred members or 
more, three delegates for five hundred or 
more and one delegate for each additional 
five hundred or majority fraction thereof. 

Section III. Affiliated Unions shall be 
entitled to one vote for each one hundred 
members or majority fraction thereof. 
When more than one delegate represents 
an organization, the vote of their unions 
shall be equally divided among such dele- 
gates. 

Section IV. Delegates shall have the 
same qualifications as the elected officers 
of the organization represented and shall 
be elected by a general vote of each or- 
ganization provided, no one shall be seated 
as a delegate who is also a member in any 
Labor Organization not affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America, 
etc. 

Credentials. 

Duplicates of credentials should be 
mailed not later than November 15, 1917, 
to the International office in order that 
the Committee on Audit and Credentials, 
which meets prior to the Convention, may 
have ample time to complete its work and 
be ready to submit its report when the 
Convention convenes. 

It is suggested that District Unions or 
delegates having matters they desire to 
submit to the Convention will do so by 
forwarding copies of resolutions which 



they desire to introduce, to the Interna- 
tional's Secretary-Treasurer at least one 
week in advance of the Convention. This, 
for the purpose of facilitating the work of 
the Convention. 

You are res])ectfully requested to take 
up the matters herein mentioned with your 
Lhiion in order that the Convention Call 
may receive careful consideration by the 
largest number of members possible. 

With best wishes, I am, 
Fraternally yours, 

T. A. HANSON, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

Chicago, III., Sept. 11, 1917. 



LABOR "SPEAKING FOR ITSELF." 



The "war committee" of the Central 
Labor Council of Seattle performed a most 
important service when they submitted a 
report to the effect that labor could well 
be left to speak for labor in matters af- 
fecting us connected with the present war, 
without the interference of any outside 
agencies, either pro-war or anti-war. So 
many organizations have lifted up their 
voices to "speak for labor" and so many 
individuals have come forward to "explain 
labor's attitude" before the public that it 
was time to call a halt and to remind one 
and all that labor has organizations and 
officers and the ability to speak for itself 
on .all questions. 

The groups of pacifists on the one side 
and the everything-for-war advocates on 
the other are to-day getting what small 
comfort they may from the resolutions of 
the Central Labor Council, but the fact is 
that body, representing labor, is plugging 
along, day after day, taking care of all 
the little inroads on the liberties and rights 
of the workers and edging nearer and 
nearer to the goal of complete industrial 
democracy as a fitting concomitant to the 
political democracy for which the nation 
is fighting. — Seattle Union Record. 



OLD THRONES. 



According to a press dispatch from 
Helsingfors the Finnish throne of the late 
Russian dynasty has been placed in the 
National museum there. 

This is only one of many thrones that 
are going to be discarded. Soon the mu- 
seums will be crowded anad rummage 
sales are not very profitable, after all. If a 
throne is new and in good condition it can 
be easily turned into a Gloucester ham- 
mock or if of the older type may be made 
into a comfortable rocking chair with arms 
and an antimacassar. 

Old croAvns may be used as cake baskets, 
and scepters as back scratchers. With the 
cost of living so high, every little economy 
counts. — Four Lights. 



William Corbett was firmly convinced 
that the potato and prosperity could not 
exist side by side, and he quotes with ap- 
proval the opinion of Sir Charles Wolseley 
that on the Continent "in whatever propor- 
tion the cultivation of potatoes prevails the 
working people are wretched." He is in- 
deed constantly girding at the vegetables, 
and, in his "Rural Rides," recounts noting 
with satisfaction, in the course of a journey 
from St. Albans to Chesham, that he did 
not see "three acres of potatoes in this 
whole tract of fine country." 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, HI 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

Headquarters: 

406 N. Clark Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 3637. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 19 Main Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 1-2 Ferry Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 47 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND. O 



Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, VVls. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Stations: 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaultee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusl^y, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 



59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash...: 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

EUREKA, Cal 227 First Street, P. O. Box 64 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash... 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal... 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C.) Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C.) Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
\STORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 10 East Street 

SACRAMENTO, Cal Labor Temple 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Organized glass workers employed 
by W. P. Fuller & Co., of Taconia, 
Wash., have secured the 44-hour 
week, a 20 per cent, wage increase 
and a weekly pay day instead of 
semi-monthly, as formerly. 

The Fore River Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration of Quincy, Mass., has 
averted a general strike by agree- 
ing to pay prevailing rates, time 
and one-half for overtime and double 
time for Sunday and holiday work. 

Butcher Workmen's Union has se- 
cured a union-shop agreement with 
the several packing plants in Peoria, 
111. Wage increases range from 10 
to 18 per cent. The agreement will 
run for six months and benefits over 
200 workers. 

The first strike of oil-field workers 
in Oklahoma was won when the Sin- 
clair Oil and Gas Company granted 
the demands of 300 employes. Wages 
are raised IS per cent., except clean- 
ers, who will be paid $150 a month. 

Committees representing federated 
shopmen employed on the New 
York, Ontario and Western Rail- 
road have signed a six months' 
agreement and raised rates 4 cents 
an hour. The company wanted a 
longer agreement but the workers 
refused. 

At the Central Labor Council 
meeting it was stated tliat a firm 
in Seattle, Wash., circulated a paper 
with two columns, one side reading: 
"Patriotic Employes Sign Here (10 
hours)," the other reading, "Those 
Who are Not Patriotic Sign Here 
(eight hours)," and that more than 
200 signed for the eight hours, not- 
withstanding the stigma the company 
endeavored to place on their de- 
mand. 

At the seventeenth convention of 
the Stove Mounters' International 
Union, held in Detroit, Mich., it 
was voted to increase dues to 35 
cents a week, making the per capita 
25 cents per week. Delegates agreed 
that the membership has made sub- 
stantial gains during the past three 
years and that it is good policy to 
stiffen the financial resources of the 
union and to also maintain an ef- 
fective organization agitation that 
the menace of non-unionism may be 
removed. 

Reports to Labor Commissioner 
Morrissey from the State free em- 
ployment bureau of Grand Junction, 
Colo., in the western part of the 
State, show that all over the western 
side of the Rocky Mountains a huge 
surplus of labor is found and that 
wages, especially in the orchards, is 
only nominal. Commissioner Mor- 
rissey says there are no requests 
for labor in the hay fields of Gun- 
nison County, where wages range 
from $3 to $3.50 a day, and that in 
the northern part of the State no 
labor shortage is reported. 

Officers of the Lehigh Valley Coal 
Company of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., have 
notified John P. White, president of 
the United Mine Workers, that the 
miners' invitation to discuss the 
union shop has been accepted. The 
unionists are hopeful that the con- 
ciliatory attitude of the operators 
will result in an agreement that 
will end petty strikes and enforce 
discipline in the anthracite fields. At 
present the miners' organization has 
no control over probably 100,000 
workers and some operators are con- 
ceding that the union shop will check 
many disputes. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Offlco Phon* Elliott 11M 



Bstabllshcd 1890 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Dat« Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamahip Inapectora' Offlc* 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEIATTLB, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Fumltur* 

26 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORB, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wa»h., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 



Alton, N. 
Anderson, H. -822 
Andersen, Julius 
Andersen, K. P. 
Andersen, Frank H. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, Gust 
Anise. Johan 
Andersen, John 
.\nderson, Martin 
Abrahamsen, W. 
Berg, John 
Bertelsen, B. 
Bensen, Helge 
Broundi. F. 
Buhman, H. 
Busch, H. 
Bywater, C. 
Bjurnson, J. 
(package) 
Blomberg, Gust 
Benedict, Joe 
Berglin, G. H. 
Borvik, C. Eliasen 
Cadogan, J. 
Carruthers, M. 
Chamberlain, L. C. 
Checkan, B. 
Connery, Matt 
Corty, C. 
Carlson, Gus 
Caravan, W. W. 
Christoffersen, B. 
Danielsen. O. J. 
Dehler, F. M. 
Droje, II. 
Darrow, H. 
Drotningbaug, O. 
Elia-sen, H. O. -837 
Eliasen, John E. 
Ekholm, Gus 
Ettrup, Jens 
Erikscn, Alfred 
Eriksen, E. 
Erikson, John 
Engebretsen, J. 
Fogel, O. 
Franzell, A. 
Forrest, Wide 
Fallbom, J. A. 
Gabrlelsen, Gust 
Glace, G. 
Gronbock, Theo. 
Groth. Karl 
Gaupeseth, S. 
Gill, Harry 
Gilbert, A. J. 
Grau, Axpsel 
Hanson, Andrew 
Hansen, Marlu.s 
Hansen, Ole 
Hunter. G. H. 
Hannelius, Ragnar 
Hosset, C. 
Hammond, Chas. 
Hansen. U -1314 
Hendrlksen, John 
Holmes, C. A. 
Isaksen, A. W. 
Isaksen, O. 
Jensen, H. P. A. 
Jypesen, Peter 
Johnson, A. 
.lohnson, Alex 
Johnson, J. -343 
Johnson, Andrew 
Jorgensen, Fredrik 
Jullson, C A. 
Jensen, Hans 
Jargenbeck, J. 
.Tohanson, J. R. 
Johansen, Karl 
Johnson, Chas. 
Karlson. Gustaf A. 
Karlson, Johan E. 



T>ackey, C. 
Larsen, Nils 
Larsen. Emll 
Larson, Lars 
Larson, E. 
Lausson, Jack 
Laursen. Nils 
Llndstrom, T. 
I/undberg, A. C. 
Lauresen, Hans 
I>indwall, Richard 
T^arsen, M. E. L. 
Lindecker. C. 
Larsen, Ejernd 

(package) 
Larsen, C. -1516 
Magi. John 
Marko. H. 
Mathisen. Joreen 
McNirol, G. C. 
Madsen, Johannus 
McNeill, Ross 
Mathesen, Nils 
MacLeod, John 
McManlgal, Thos. 
Mikkelsen. K. -1630 
Mostad, Leonard 
Mikkelsen. P. 
Madsen, C. H. 
Mathiesen. Jorger 
Matson, Eric 
McLaughlin, Dan 
Nelsen. N. P. 
Nielsen, Even F. 
Ness, L. 
Nilsen, N. 
Nord, F. 
Norton, Emil 
Nyhagen, Julius 
Nelson. M. -1330 
Nelson, John 
Nielson, Christen 
Newman, John 
Newland. E. 
Naro, M. 
Nilsen, J. G. 
Nelsen, L. 
Ohman, H. 
Olsen, C. Otto 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, Johan S. 
Olsen, Olsen 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen, .Tohan 
Olsen, HJalmar Fr. 
Olsen, Henry 
Olsen, J. H. 
Ovvall, Johan 
Olsen, B. -r,97 
01.=en, A. M. 
Olsson, Frank 
Olsson. C. M. -6S24 
Olsen, Ole -1020 
Owens, J. H. 
Petterson, Chr. 
Petterson, O. N. 
Federsen, Carl 
Pederson, H. -1,560 
Perkins, Floyd 
Powers. James 
Petersen, Hans L. 
Paterson. P. 
Plant, W. 
Rehnstrom. A. G. 
Renberg, Ed. 
Roos, A. W. 
Roos, B. 
Rosenqulst, G. 
Rasmussen. L. 
Riscossa, John 
Ron, Gus 
Ruckmlck, Anton 
Rosnes, C. B. 
Russel, Arthur 
Runstrum, Albert 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER «. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIO STORES 

Store No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer. In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Taconia Letter LUt. 



Andersson, Alberto 
Carlstrand, G. 
Darbarog, Martin 
Hodson, H. I. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
.Tacobson, Gustaf 
Kalberg, William 
Keinanen, Emil 
Magnusson, Ernest 

W. 
Martlnsson, E. 
Marx, Thorvald 



-751 



Nelson, C. W. 
Nielsen, Niels 
Palken, G. 
Pearson, Fred 
Petterson, HJalmar 
Pettersen, Charles 

-472 
SImonsen, Sam 
Stewart. Wm. H. 
Suemlnen, Oscar 
Swansen, Carl 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8S93 



Renstrom, P. 
Salonen, John 
Sandberg, John 
Slgvartsen, A. 
Simonsen, A. S. 
Smith, Emil 
Stalzerman, Emll 
Svard, C. P. 
Svansen, Ben 
Saunders, Oscar 
Schmidt, Emil -1520 
Seibert, Henry 
Slgvartsen, Arthur 
Sorensen, Carl 
Stein, J. 
Strasdin, A. W. 
Swansen, Axel 
Saxley, C. H. 
.Sivertsen. Karl 



Smith, G. -893 
Svard, C. P. 
Them, Arvld 
Thai, Richard 
Tingburg, Axel 
Tergersen, A. N. 
Tiechert. G. 
Telkert, K. H. 
Valentlnsen, G. 
Venema, H. 
Williams, T. C. 
Walker, H. W. 
Walker, J. H. 
Woodley, Clifford 
Wellbrook, Henry 
Wlnstrom, Oscar 
Woodbury, G. W. 
Wold. J. J. 
Zilenk, A. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Q M OK' P R ^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
O IVl W IV IL IV O ^j^^ j^ ^j^j^^ y^^ 3j.g served. 



Union-made Cigars. 

HlM ([nMlV$. 'nji (V C«iMs co"ij«d .nihil bo. nj.e ben mat by* fllSCliSS WorKlBIl 

aMiUeCROf TKEQCUMMEU'lHURNATIO'UlUNIONor Affltncj. jn orOinilJtioa devotM tbthiad 

•dnaniMi of iiit MO»Ai MATWUdjna mmilt'iJAi «( JsBt OF TXt CSaTT. TttrifonmiKonaen 

tlKM Cioirs to 411 vnAir^ Ihrounhoul lh« wortd 



v ctriUof 



Eureka, CaL 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

812 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers tn Enterprise 
Imager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

A square"meal 

- Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTER 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING SHOES, HATS, RUBBER 

AND OH, CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
126 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 

Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 

Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tol>ac- 

cos, and notions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

S04 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATg, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everjrthing Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 



"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors Rest" 

cigars. Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST.. HOQUIAM, WASH. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 









Photo by Terkelson & Henry 



SEAMEN! 

Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

Invites All Seamen to His Up-to-Date Store in 
the New Southern Pacific Building 

20 and 22 STEUART ST., S. F. 

MERCHANDISE COVERING THE WANTS 

OF ALL SEAMEN 

Uniforms, Hats, Caps and Shoes 

WATERPROOF OIL SKINS 
and RUBBER BOOTS 

Come In and Inspect My Entire New Stock of 
UNION MADE GOODS 



Home News 



The beet sugar producers have 
come to an agreement with the Food 
Administration to limit the price of 
their sugar to a basis that is ex- 
pected to result in a reduction of 
one and a half cents a pound from 
the present price. This will save 
the consuming public $30,000,000 be- 
tween now and the first of next 
year. 

Fayette County, Kentucky (the 
city of Lexington and its environs), 
has raised $3,000 more than the 
$55,000 required to pay for the build- 
ings of its tuberculosis sanitarium. 
Popular vote two years previously 
authorized the sanitarium, but ex- 
penditures for roads used up the 
county funds, and rather than wait 
indefinitely, the citizens decided to 
raise the money by contribution. 

The advance in prices of book 
paper last year was excessive and 
unwarranted, reports the Federal 
Trade Commission. It is stated 
that the average profits of 39 prin- 
cipal book paper mills were nearly 
100 per cent, higher in 1916 than in 
1915. The average increase in mar- 
gins on current sales of machine- 
finished book paper for one quarter 
last year advanced 492 per cent, for 
Boston jobbers and 203 per cent, 
for Chicago jobbers. 

Hawaii displays devotion to the 
cause in which the nation is enlisted 
out of proportion to the size of the 
Territory, but well within the 
bounds of its patriotism and its 
enthusiasm for democracy. On the 
basis of its population, the gross 
military quota of Hawaii was 2403. 
On April 1 the islands were repre- 
sented by 4237 in the National 
Guard, or nearly double the number 
required to fill the quota. Since that 
date other additions have been made, 
bringing the net contribution of the 
Territory to the United States army 
up to 4397 men. And word comes 
from Honolulu to the effect that 
this is not the best that Hawaii can 
do, or is willing to do. 

The recent temporary closing 
down of the entire subway trans- 
portation system in New York City 
because of the nonarrival of a barge- 
load of coal for the power plant, 
seriously inconvenienced several hun- 
dred thousand people, to say nothing 
of the interruption of business. The 
incident, though it perhaps serves 
no other useful purpose, illustrates 
the close interdependence of present- 
day industries and other activities. 
Every link in the chain must stand 
its share of the strain. Every man 
must do his bit. But this does 
not explain just why the fuel supply 
of a great public service utility 
should have been allowed to get 
down to the last shovelful. 

As a result of a clash between 
negro soldiers of the Twenty-fourth 
United States Infantry stationed at 
Houston Texas, and the police of 
that city, a number of mutinous 
troops, estimated at 125, seized guns 
and ammunition, and engaged in a 
riot that resulted in the death of 
seventeen persons, and the wound- 
ing of several others. The city was 
immediately placed under martial 
law. The men have been taken 
to Columbus, New Mexico, where 
they will be tried by court martial. 
Major General George Bell, Jr., is in 
charge. The mutinous soldiers have 
been indicted for murder by the 
civil authorities, but the army of- 
ficials insist upon trying them. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The new schooner "William Tay- 
lor" has been launched at Bruns- 
wick, Ga. Length 225 ft., beam 43 
ft., 2100 tons deadweight. 

The oil tanker "O. B. Jennings," 
of 10,900 tons gross register, was 
launched at Newport News, August 
25, for the Standard Oil Co. of 
New Jersey. She will have a speed 
of lOH knots. 

Two keels for two 430 ft. steamers 
are laid at the Texas Steamship 
Company's yard, Bath, occupying the 
places vacated by the steamers 
"Maine" and "Rhode Island" recent- 
ly put overboard. 

The barge that the Kelley, Spear 
Company of Bath, Me., is construct- 
ing for the J. B. King Transporta- 
tion Company of New York, will be 
named "Samuel W. Fancher" and 
will have a carrying capacity of 3600 
tons. She will be ready for launch- 
ing in October. 

Captain Pearson, a South African, 
has purchased at Liverpool, N. S., 
the schooner "Kernwood." It is 
the Captain's intention to send her 
to South Africa, to engage in fishing 
in those waters. The schooner is 
being overhauled and fitted with 
auxiliary engines at Liverpool. It 
is understood that it is Captain 
Pearson's intention to purchase 
other schooners of similar size and 
type to be used for the same pur- 
pose in South African waters. 

The Shipping Board is formulating 
plans for the diversion of the major 
part of food shipments abroad from 
New York and other North Atlantic 
ports to the principal ports of the 
South. It is expected that this plan 
will only relieve congestion at the 
northern ports and enable the rail- 
roads to increase their efficiency 
greatly during the winter. Conges- 
tion at northern ports during the 
last two years has often caused 
ships to remain at the docks for 
eight or ten days awaiting cargoes. 
The recent successful voyage of 
coal-laden barges up the Mississippi 
River to St. Paul, the promised 
shipments of ore cargoes from Min- 
nesota iron mines, by the same route 
downward to the Ohio River, and 
the recently declared purpose of 
those behind the project to equip 
another fleet for the shipment of oil, 
all combine to restore to the great 
river at least some of its lost pres- 
tige as a burden-bearer. It is not 
the fault of the river that it has 
not always been a greater factor 
in equalizing freight rates in the 
wonderful basin to which it has 
given its name. It has invited com- 
merce since the days of De Soto, 
but the appeal has long been un- 
heeded. 

The big twin-screw steamship 
"Kronprinzessin C e c i 1 i e," which 
slipped quietly from dry dock at 
"An Atlantic Port" a few days ago, 
to receive the finishing touches 
which will make her ready for duty, 
is another of the German vessels, 
interned at the outbreak of the war, 
soon to enter the world campaign to 
prevent the further spread of "kul- 
tur." Those who will command, 
those who will man, and those who 
will be transported overseas on this 
ship are not, it is presumed, greatly 
interested in any peace plan based 
on "condonation." Rechristened and 
"naturalized," the craft bids fair to 
carry back to Europe a cargo very 
different from any her former own- 
ers intended her to bear. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

IVIISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Cor. Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1917 
Assets ....... 

Deposits ....... 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ... 

Employees' Pension Fund ..... 

Number of Depositors ..... 



$64,566,290.79 

61,381,120.63 

2,185,170.16 

259,642.88 

65,717 



San Francigco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall Is advertised In 
these coluHins should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
IKjrt of their destination. 

Abaling, Matias Anderson, A. 

Abrahanison, Alfred Anderson, A. -2031 
Abrahamson, WernerAnderson, Andrew 
Ahlquist, Kvert J. Anderson, J. A. 
Adamson, Johan Anderson, Fred 

-1144 Andersen, M. -1661 

Albers, Geo. Anderson, Nils 

Albert, J. C. Anderson, P. 

Albertsen, Peter S. Anderson, Victor E. 
Albrecht, Chas. Anderson, Wilford 

Allen. James Andersson, A. -1060 

Allen, W. A. Andreasen, Hans 

Aito, Johan -1349 -1477 

Altonen. Karl Anshmit, Martin 

Andersen, Carl Antonsson, G. -2077 

Andersen, Emll Apple, August 

Andersen. H. -1526 Askloe. Knut A. 
Andersen, K. P. Aspe, T. 

Andersen, Martin Auzin, A. -363 
Andersen. O. -1118 Aylward, James 



Hohensang, George Hubert, Harry 



Hjal- 



Baach. A. 
Baardsen, T. 
Baker. C. 
Bandel, Kurt 
Barry. William J. 
Beckford, David 
Behrendt. Paul 
Beint. R. J. 
Benson, Helge A. 
Bentin, Paul 
Berggren, Oscar 
Bergman, Werner 
Bergstrom. Paavo 
Berk, E. W. 
Bertelson, Oskar 
-2184 



Bindlintr. O. -2291 
Bjorkhoim, A. M. 
Bjorn, Christ 
Bodker, Niels L. 
Blom, Nils 
Blomgren, Marcus 
Blumberg, Gustave 
Borg, A. 
Boswell, J. W. 
Bower, Gosta 
Bratt. Walfred 
Breien,- Hans 
Brennan, P. 
Brynlng, Walter 
Buck, August 
Buhler. Karl 



Holm, O. 
Holmstrom, 

mar 
Hopp, Carl 
Horton, Bert 

Isaacson, J. 
Isberg, Wicktar 

Jacklin, Chas. 
Jacobs, August 
Jacobsen, Chas. 
Jacobsen, H. P. 
Jacobson, Edward 
Jacobson, Joakim 
Jakobsen, M. 
Janson, Brandrop 
Jarzombeck, J. 
Jensen, Erns 
Jensen, John F. 
Johannesen, J. 

-1441 
Johansen, Gunner 
Johansen, H. V. 
Johansen, Jolian 
Johansen, Ole 

Kaasik, August 
Kallas, A. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kalniii, J. 
Karsten. Hugo B. 
Katz, Fred. 
Keilaman, T. 
Kilgour, Jack 
Kiiidlund, Otto 
Kipste, Charley 
Kline. Walter C. 
Kirkhani, George 



Hughes, W. 
Hull. H. 
Hunter, G. H. 
Hunter, J. L. 

Iversen, Ivar 
Ivertaen, Slgvald B. 

Johansen, T. A. 
Johanson, Axel 
Johansson. Bernard 
Johnsen, Norman 
Jolinson, Arnold 
Johnson, Aug. K. 
Johnson, G. M. 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, John H. 
Jolinson, M. 
Johnsson, C. J. 
Jonsson, P. W. 
Jordan, O. 
Jorgensen, Carl W. 
Jorgensen, Waither 
Joyce, W. 
Jungbeig, H. L. 

Knoppe, Wm. 
Knudsen, Carl 
Knute, A. 
Koferd. George 
Kornellus. Martin 
Kostcr. Walter 
Krishjau, K. 
Kristensen, K. D. 
Kristiansen, Jakob 
Kroft, Harry 
Krooii, R. W. -1142 
Kuhn, John 



Petrow, A. 
Phllman. George 
I'ollock. T. 
Porter, Henry 
Pottage, Chas. E. 

Ramstad, Andreas 
Rand, J. 
Rapson, E. 
RasmuEsen, Axel 
RasmuKsen. Jacob 
Rehs, Paul 
Relth, K. C. R. 

Saalmann, Jooseph Sigwartsen, Arthur 

Sahlberg, Waldemar Simonsen. SIgvard 

SamllicrK, Niel Skoglund, Harrv 

Salminen. Karl W. Skotvik. Ole M. 

Sander, Otto Smedsviff. Oluf R. 

Sander, Robert Smith, Edward F. 

Sanne, Rudolph Smith, W. -707 

Sassi. Wilhelm Spencer, Harry 



Poulsen, Emil 
Poysky, Jahlmar 
Punls. Anton 
Pusner, W. T. 



Rollo, R. 
Rommerdahl, A. 
Ronger, Henry 
Rosenblad, E. A. 
Ross, W. A. 
Rou. Gustav 
Ruekmieh, Anton 



Saunders, Chas. 
Savage, Roland 
Scanlon. Jolm 
Schamm. Charles 
Schlachte, Alfred 
Schlkore, Otto 
Schmidt 
Schroder, 



Spets. Karl 
Sprogae. Theo. 
St. Clair, Chris. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stennesen, Harald 
Stenroos, Frans 
E. -1570 Sfogren, John 
Paul Stoltzerman. E. 



Schultz, Albert Strandberg, Olaf 

Schultze, Johannes Strand, Emll 



Schulze, John 
Schwendt, Walde- 
mar 
Seiffert, .Tnhannes 
Suferd. John 
SiefCert. Leonhard 
Semon, .Toseph 

Tamanen, Erland 
Telander, Helder 

Tonnesen, Andreas Tlngberg, Axel 

Tham, Alec Tiersland. Sverre 

Thee, Rudolph Toby. Jolin 

Thomsen, Peder Tonis.oen, I', G. 
Thompson, BenjaminTompson, Fritz 

Thompson. G. E. Tnmsen, Harrv 

Thompson. G. F. Tellefsen, N. Emll 



Straiten, H. B. 
Svensson, W. -2591 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Swanson, B. 
Swanson, J. -1013 
Swenson, !>. V. 
Swinka, Albert 

Thorsen, Herman 
Thorsen, Tor. 



Klinteberg, Stenof Kurki, Emil 



Berthelsen, Charles Burgess, Robert 



Beselin. Ed 
Bindberg, O. F. 
Blederstedt, Fritz 



Bushman, John 
Byers, A. 
Byglin, Oiva O. 



Campbell, Martin 

Carlsen, Pete 

Carlson, Bennie 

Carlson, Gust 

Carlson. Charles 

Carlsson, S. -1474 

Carmell, G. 

Carr, W, n. 

Carsten, Alfred 

Cashin, John Ben Conolly, Frank 

Casslmos, C. Cooistra, Sam 

Cederlof, Knut 

Dahlgren, W. A. Didrickson. Martin 
Danielsen, Louis M. Doering, Julius 



Chariot, George 
Chrlstensen, Alfred 
Christensen, O. G. 
Christensen, Oscar 
Chrlstianson, Sam 
Christoffersen, G. 
Clipper, Mike 
Corcoran, C. I,. 
Comstedt. Oscar 



Knitzer, A. 

Lanureuer, Hcli 
Larsen, C. A. M. 
Larsen, Hakon 
Larsen, Hans 
Larsen, Herman 
Larsen, Henry 
Larsen, J. 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, Rogner 
Larson, Axel 
Larson, Carl 
Larsson, Adolf 



Kvalvik, Oscar 

Lind, Gustaf A. 
Lindh, N. W. 
Lindroos, A. W. 
Liverdal, G. 
Lofgren, Richard 
Ixjline, E\'an 
Lorensen. Nick 
Lorentzeen, Krist 
Lorin. Christian 
Lovgren, Otto 
Luckner, A. 
Lundeen, Eric F. 



Larsson, Alfred R. Lund, ChrlstofEer 
Larsson, Ragnar Lund. Eric E. 



nanielson. J. 
Davey, Chas. 
riavis, Frank A. 
Decoe, Eugene 
Degroot, George 
Dehler, A. M. 
Deswert, Robert 
Dettloft, W. C. 
Deur. Henry 
Dexter, Arthur 

Eck, Chas. 
Rckhoff. Otto 
Edmann, O. -557 
Ekholm, Frank 
Ekiund. Qua. 
Ekstrom. Georgre 
Kkstrom, Viktor 
KUerman, T. 
Ellingsen, Erling 

Fabruoski 



Dracar, E. 
Dracar, Ivan Z. 
Drager, Otto 
Dukatz, H. 
Dumas. C. 
Dunkel, Charley 
Dunn, Walter 
Dutra. Anthony 
Dybdal, Olaf 

Einardt, John 
Elward, Jim 
Emkow, Otto 
Kngbloni, John 
Erifkson, Alf. 
Ertman. Eskil 
Evan, Stanley 
Evenson, E. V. 



Fahnke, Paul 
Farcum, Andrew 
Farrell, Bernard 
Farrell, Harry 
Kelsch, Harry 
Felsch, W. 



TheodoreFJellman, George E. 



Forsberg, Sven 
Fredholm, Chas. J. 
Fredrlksen, Birgler 
Fredrickson, Martin 
Frelherg. Peter 
Frlcke. Wm. 



Fergerson, Thomas Frick, H. C. 



Grantz. John 
Gray. Hamilton 
Grath, J. 
Green, J. 
Gregg, R. O. 
Gregory, Antonio 
Greir. A. 

Gunderson, George 
Gundersen, Kristlan 
Gunderson, John 
Gunther, Ted 
Oustafson, Chns. 
Gustafsson, Valter 



Gallenburg, M. 
Ganser, Joe 
Gardener. Ed. 
CJardell, Charlie 
Gasch, Wm. 
Gasman, George 
Gassner, Joe 
Gonarshang, G. 
Gent, Adam C. 
Gerard, Albert 
Gerber, Leland K. 
Gerner, Hans 
Grabower, Martin 
Granstrom. Nestor 

Hackensmith, R. C. Hanson. Chas. -927 
Hagberg. Gust. Hanson, Rudolph 

Hagsteilt. Charles Haraldsen, Alf 
Hahne. Wilhelm B. Harner, Ambros 
Halbeck, Oscar Ilartog, J. 

Hale. KIngley Harburg, Walter 

Haivarten. O. -116"Hegg, Blrger 
Handlon. Paul E. Heln, M. 

Heinonen, Kusta 
Helgesen. George 
Heliman, H. W. 
Hendersen, H. 



Last. Paul 
Leamey, W. 
Lehtonen, J. O. 
Lolit, I'eter 
Lidsten, Charles 
Liiider, V. 
Llndblom, Ekiw. 

Maais, Joseph P. 
Maas, Rudolp 
Maalta, John 
Macchl, Willy 
Madsen, Ludvig 
Magnuson, Carl 



Lundiiiark, Helge 
Lundquist, Axel 
Lundqulst, C. A. 
Lunstedt, Chris. 
Lundquist, R. A. 
Lynd. C. 
Lyngaard, Jorgen 

McDermot, William 
McKeon, Thos. 
McManus. P. 
McNeil, D. R. 
Meinjohanns, C. 
Melgand, R. 



Magnusson, Sigurd Mersman, A. 



Thompson, John 
Thompson, Olle 
Thorsen, Hans K. 

Ultman, Th. 

Vallianos, Splros 
Vannkvist. Ernst 
Vejooda, F. 

Walenhis, Karl K. 

Wall. Alfred 

Wallin, Bereer 

Walter. John 

Wank, Roman 

Ward. Jack 

Wasserlooa, Rudolf Wilson. C J. 

Wene, Karl Johan Wirkkl, Relnhold 

Westergaard, L. Wissmann, F. W. 

Ziehr, Ernst 

PACKAGES. 



Torrance, John 

Trovlck. Harold 

Tweedale. D. S. 

Upplt, Walter 

Von Dyke. Harry 
Vrikl, Silas 



Wezwagar. Andrew 
Wiik. FYank 
AViller. Carl F. 
Whiteside, Fred. 
Wlcklund. WIctor 
Williams, Charlie 



Laurlsen, Niels 
I>awherg. A. W. 
Murray, Con. P. 
Myers. W. 
Neumann, H. J. 



Andersen, Andov 
Berllng. J. B. 
Carlson. John 
Dettloft. W. C. F. 
Grenne. O. H. 

Gunvaldsen, Ingvald Olsen. H. C. 
Heidenburg, Gus Olsen. R. B. 
Jacobsen. Alfred Oslund. O. 
Jensen, Hans Olsson. C. G. - 

Johansson, Werner Sander. Otto 
Larsen. C. A. Smedsvlk. O. B. 

Larsen, Ed. Thorsen. Thor. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Maki, Ivar 
Malmin. T. 
Malmstrom, E. 
Mardson, A. 
Marckwardt. Carl 
Markman, Harry 
Martindale, John 
Martinesen, L. 



Metge, Gus 
Mikkelsen, Jack 
Mikkelson, Peter 
Mertheus, H. 
Mohr. Charles 
Monroe, John 
Monsen. Blrger 
Monteiro, Joe 



Martin, J. F. -2604 Morris, O. R. 



Martin, Jos. 
Martin, R. F. 
Matheson. Alex 
Matson, Alick 

Nelsen. C. -936 

Nelsen. Olaf 

Nelson, A. 

Nelson, Adolph H. 

Nelson, A. W. 

Nelson, c'lias. 

Nelson, Harry 

Nelson. Karl C. 
Niejahr, Oskar 



Moyel, W. 
Muller. Nilly 
Myrhoi, J. P. 

Nielsen. Harald J. 
NielsoD. b. 
Nillson- Josef 
Noble. Fred 
Nolan, James 
Nolen, Axel 
Norberg, J. A. 
Norrls. Norman A. 
Nurmlnen, John G. 



Olansen, Christian Olsen, John 
OJeda, Leonardo Olsen, Oswald 



Hannus, Alex 
Hannus, Mike 
Hannus. P. 
Hansen. A. -2542 
Hansen. -August 
Hansen, Axel H. 
Hansen. Fredrick 
Hansen, J. -2354 
Hansen. .T. -2156 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, M. -948 
Hansen, Pagaard 
Hansen, W. C. H. 



Hendriksen. John 
Henke. Ernest 
Henkelman. H. J. 
Henrlksen. Harald 
Herman, David 
Hf-rmansson. C. P. 
Herlng. Alfred 
Hoff. Axel 
Holberg, Oluf 



O'Leary, John 
Olesen, Chas. 
Olesen, Chr. 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, Amund 
Olsen, Anton 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, C. M. 
Olsen, Ed. J. 
Olsen, F. -1249 
Olsen, Fred 

Paludan, Chas. 
Palu, G. 

PaulsBon. Herman 
Pedersen. Chas. 
Pedersen. George 
Pedersen. Louis 
Pederssen, Conrad 
Peise, G. 
Person. N. F. 
Pestoft, S. 
Peterer, Joseph 



Olsen, Peder 
Olsen. R. B. 
olsun, Siegfiiod 
Olson, a. F. -5G2 
Olson, Thomas 
Olsson, Ivar H. 
Olsson, J. 
Olsson, Valdemar 
Osterhofl, H. 
Overgaard, Peter 

Petersen, Olav 
Petersen, Walter 

G. 
Petersen, Wilhelm 
Peterson, Axel 
Peterson. C. -1493 
Peterson, L. 
Peterson. Robert L. 
Petter, G. 

Peterson, Viktor 
Pettersson, Eugen 



T. Miller, Fritz Ruf, M. Griebert 
and W. Wagner, formerly of the 
S. S. "Ardmore," are wanted at once 
in the matter of salvage claims 
against the S. S. "Ardmore" by mem- 
bers of the crew of the S. S. "Prince- 
ton." Kindly communicate at once 
with S. B. Axttil, 1 Broadway, New 
York. N. Y. 4-11-17 



CONTROL 

"THE TONIC OF THE AGES" 

Gives power, health and success. By 

toning, regulating and purifying the 

vital organs. At all Drug Stores. 

Only in Bottles, 75c 

REFUSE SUBSTITUTE 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Petersen, A. -1551 Pettersson, Konrad 
Petersen, Chris Petterson. Oskar 



Phone Douglas 4290 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

BANKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 

Rooms 448-450, Fourth Floor 

Two Entrances: 

742 Market Street 49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 
Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and l\/larl<et Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL. L.UNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

60 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate .Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union IVIade 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 IVIIsslon Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1416 San Francisco 



HOTEL MELBA 

Connected with Faistaff Restaurant 

UP-TO-DATE FURNISHED ROOiVIS BY 

THE DAY, WEEK OR MONTH 

Rooms, 25c to $1.00 per Night 

$1.50 to $3.50 per Week 

Hot and Cold Water in Each Room 

Free Bath 

Phone Kearny 5044 214 JACKSON ST. 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




NOTICE TO SEAMEN!! 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

is now located in Permanent Quarters 

— at — 

20-22 STEUART STREET 

in the new Southern Pacific Building 



ENTIRE NEW STOCK 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 






"Ale 

AND 

Porter 

II -EUga 

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tJnion 

MADE 

Beer 



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THIS IS OUR LABEL 



DEMAND 

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IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



News from Abroad 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources ..$7,700,000 

iVIember of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 
DIRECTORS 
G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Bisslnger J. 8. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 
O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 
SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 
Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 
103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 2518 

HULTEN a RUDOLPH 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Wlillams 



UNION TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near IVIarl<et 



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advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



PACIFIC NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Study for your license with a practical Shipmaster and 

Up-to-Date Navigator 
Pupils studying with me will receive personal attention 

CAPTAIN A. B. SOWDEN, 

Rooms 340-41 Montgomery Block 
Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets San Francisco 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 



716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 

SUITS TO ORDER, 
$30.00 TO $50.00 

Union Made 
in Our Own Shop 




Weekly Wages 
No Piece Work 

Eight-Hour Work Day 



JACOB PETERSEN ft SON 

Proprietors 
Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 
— and — 
17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



German occupation of Belgium 
thus far has cost in money raised 
from the Belgian people by the so- 
called "war contributions," and de- 
struction more than $1,600,000,000, ac- 
cording to the compilation of the 
American Committee of American 
Engineers. 

The sliding scale of maximum 
prices to be paid for live cattle 
has been fixed by the British Food 
Controller as follows: For Septem- 
ber, $17.76 per hundred pounds; 
October, $17.28; November and De- 
cember, $16.08; and for January, 
$14.40. 

The Japanese House of Repre- 
sentatives has a Reprimand Com- 
mittee that recently compelled a 
member to present a written apology 
for language used in a speech in 
which he said: "The pro-govern- 
ment members talk so much that 
they are a nuisance." 

The former German steamship 
"Cincinnati," which has been placed 
under the American flag, has been 
renamed the "Covington" by the 
Navy Department. The change was 
made to avoid possible confusion of 
the former German liner with the 
U. S. cruiser "Cincinnati." 

The sinking at sea ofif Cape Town, 
through striking a mine, of the City 
liner "City of Athens," bound from 
New York for Indian ports, shows 
the reality of the mine danger in 
South African waters, which have 
been strewn with these death-dealing 
contrivances by neutral steamers 
chartered by the Germans. 

A ship of 200 tons has been built 
of iron and concrete in Christiania 
according to a new plan. The time 
required was three weeks, but it is 
expected that suceeding vessels will 
require only half the time. It is in- 
tended to start a wholesale building 
of iron and concrete ships of 200, 
500 and 1000 tons. 

The New South Wales Govern- 
ment has offered a reward of £1000 
in connection with the explosions on 
the Federal steamer "Cumberland." 
The "Cumberland," of 9471 tons, 
Sydney for Great Britain, was seri- 
ously damaged July 6 by two inter- 
nal explosions in one of her holds, 
and had to be beached on Gabo 
Island. 

The recent destruction by explo- 
sion of the British battleship "Van- 
guard" recalls that three earlier 
"Vanguards" all met a violent end, 
one being scuttled in the Mcdway 
in 1667, another sunk in the great 
storm of 1703, and a third, one of 
the early ironclads, sent to the 
bottom in collision with the "Iron 
Duke" in 187.'^. 

Sensations, military as well as dip- 
lomatic, were the order during the 
past week. In Russia a week of ex- 
citing events was capped by the issu- 
ance of a proclamation by Premier 
Kerensky declaring Russia a Repub- 
lic. This followed the attempt of 
General Korniloff to set up a dicta- 
torship. The movement began au- 
spiciously with the support of the 
Cossacks and a number of the Rus- 
sian armies, and for a time it looked 
as though Korniloff was really a 
strong man and a patriot, whose 
chief point of difference with Ker- 
ensky was the desire for a more 
rigorous application of the death 
penalty for traitors; but the coun- 
ter revolution suddenly collapsed and 
its leader stood revealed as a weak- 
ling. Kerensky came out of the or- 
deal with flying colors. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



"Washington was a truthful man." 
"I've got the habit myself now. I 
think it is the best plan if you marry 
a widow." — Louisville Courier-Jour- 
nal. 



Irishman (in drug store)— Oi want 
a hunk av soap. 

Clerk— Will you have it scented or 
unscented? 

Irisman— Oi'll take it wid me.— 
Dallas News. 



She (tearfully)— You said if I'd 
marry you, you'd be humbly grateful, 
and now — 

He (sourly)— Well? 

She— You're grumbly hateful.— 
London Answers. 



Envious Pa.— Young Johnny . had 
been reading the evening paper, and 
paused contemplatively for a few 
moments. "Father," said he, "what 
is 'inertia'?" 

"Well," replied the father, "if I 
have it, it's pure laziness, but if 
your mother has it, is is nervous 
prostration." — Tit-Bits. 



Nifty. — He was running a small 
provision store in a newly-developed 
district, and the big wholesale deal- 
ers found him very backward in 
payment of his accounts. 

They sent him letter after letter, 
each more politely threatening than 
the last. Finally they sent their 
representative down to give him a 
sporting chance. 

"Now," said the caller, "we must 
have a settlement. Why haven't you 
sent us anything? Are things going 

badly?" 

"No. Everything's going splen- 
didly. You needn't worry. My 
bankers will guarantee me all right." 
"Then why haven't you paid up?" 
"Well, you see, those threatening 
letters of yours were so well done 
that I've been copying them out 
and sending them round to a few 
customers of my own who won't 
pay up, and I've collected nearly all 
outstanding debts. I was only hold- 
ing back because I felt sure there 
must be a final letter, and I wanted 
to get the series complete."— Har- 
per's. 



An Invitation 

We InvUe deposits from every one- 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Do you like a good, long, cool 
smoke? If so, get a package of 
Bagley's Lime Kiln Club Cut 
Plug for your pipe. Manufac- 
tured by John J. Bagley & Co. 
for over fifty years. 

liuAmwin(iujjg!!lSk<NTD)iiA'nDNU. I t t 

^i»2!^k uKioB. o^ I Union 




Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL, 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




HENRY HEINZ 



Phone Douglas B752 



ARTHUR HEINZ 

Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches ^ 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 

NOTICE ! BOSS OF ROAD OVERALLS 

PRICE, FROM 85 CENTS UP 

Phone Douglas 1737 



Phone Piedmont 54 



FIREMEN, OILERS & WATERTENDERS ! 

WE WILL INSTRUCT YOU 
HOW TO BECOME MARINE ENGINEERS 

VANDER NAILLEN ENGINEERING SCHOOL 



5175 TELEGRAPH AVE., Near Idora Park 



OAKLAND, CAL. 



Christensen's Navigation Scltool 

Established 1906 
257 HANSFORD BLDQ., 268 MARKET STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
(examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 




Silverware, Cut Glass and Clocks for Wedding 

Presents 




^cwmmCa 

715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Qames Ji. Sorensen 

At the Big Red Clock 
and th* Chlmaa. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 
FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



WHEN 

THE TOY SEASON 

OPENS 

Remember that, de- 
spite difficulties in ob- 
taining Toys equal to 
those of former years, 
the slogan that has 
made Hale's famous 
will apply just as here- 
tofore. 




FOR TOYS 



Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 

676 Third Street 

NEAR TOWNSEND, S. F. 



I want you 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50, 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BCD SEAL CMAB CO., nANUrAaUBOS 

133 FIRST STREET, 8. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE ^ 

ilRGomsu 



> ^ fi Ub 




KSS^Tv <wv^ ^ ^.^^-yr^T'^'Q^.vT.^^^ssKag^-^v^ 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 


A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXXI, No. 3. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1917. 




Whole No. 2453. 



THE MANNING PROBLEM. 



Addresses Delivered at the Recent Washington Conference. (Continued.) 



Statement of Capt. William A. Wescott, 

President of the Masters, Mates and Pilots' 

Association of the Pacific Coast. 

Captain Wescott: Mr. Chairman, and Mr. 
Secretary, I am very sorry that I was not 
here earlier this morning, when you first be- 
gan. However, I forgot several papers and 
had to go back to the hotel to get them. I 
was very much pleased to hear the statement 
of the Secretary of Commerce in regard to 
the living quarters of the men, and I believe 
that will have a great tendency to bring men 
of all classes to the sea — not only officers, but 
seamen as well. I believe it would be a step 
well taken if the Secretary of Commerce would 
impress that fact upon the minds of the ship 
owners. 

Mr. Chairman, in regard to the scarcity of 
licensed men, I desire to say a word. We 
have at the present time about 1,000 ocean 
and coastwise vessels. If I am making any 
misstatement, I believe General Uhler, Com- 
missioner of Navigation, is here, and he will 
correct me. 

We have on the Pacific Coast about 1,000, 
or over, masters holding masters' licenses. On 
the Atlantic Coast there are over 2,000, mak- 
ing in round numbers 3,000 or more men hold- 
ing master's licenses. 

In the lower grades it amounts to about 
2,500, I should judge, as near as I can get 
at it, making between five and six thousand 
ocean licensed men, with 1,000 ships. We 
could, to-morrow, man 1,000 more vessels. We 
could place upon them a master and a chief 
mate holding a master's license, or nearly so. 

There are a great many of the chief mates 
who hold master's licenses, and many of the 
second mates hold master's licenses. We have 
vessels sailing where there are three masters 
on board; that is to say, men holding mas- 
ter's licenses. If there is a shortage, it is in 
the jimior grade; that is where the shortage 
would be. 

Among the men who were sailing as second 
mates and third mates in the last two or three 
months, are many who have gone up to a 
higher grade of license, and that is a lesson 
for the third mates, because when a man goes 
up for a higher grade license, and there is 
opportunity offered for obtaining a higher po- 
sition, he is going to lay back to get that 
higher position. 

On the Pacific Coast we have had no short- 
age of men, none whatever. 

There have been two or three occasions, on 
small steaming schooners where the accom- 
modations were not fit for the men or for 
the officers, and they had a hard time getting 
them. For that reason, I was very much 
pleased when the Secretary of Commerce made 
the statement that he did make in regard to 
living quarters. 

About the first of October there will be 
300, or approximately 300 men, on the Pacific 
Coast who will be released from the fishing 
industry on the coast. There has been an in- 
crease of about one-third in the number of 
licensed men on the Pacific Coast in the last 
three years. This has been true ever since 



llie passage of the Hardy Officering and Man- 
ning Act. If the Act is modified or changed 
in any way, I think it would drive the men 
from the ships rather than bring them to 
them. 

Now, Mr. Chairman and Mr. Secretary, there 
are many things that I would like to take up. 
I was very much grieved, for instance, when I 
read of the suspension of the law, the citizen- 
ship law with reference to the merchant ma- 
rine of the United States. I knew very well 
that it would mean that many men would not 
go to sea who would otherwise go to sea. 
I want to say that in 1913 the British Parlia- 
ment debated that question. It appears in the 
hearings before the Committee on Merchant 
Marine and Fisheries, the hearings being held 
on March 4th and 7th, 1916, at the time when 
the Government Ownership bill was up for 
consideration. With your permission, I will 
read just a little of that, Mr. Chairman. 

"Mr. Peto. The question of alien officers 
on British ships is one which undoubtedly re- 
quires regulation at once. The number of 
alien officers may not seem, very great. We 
have 63 alien masters and mates on sailing 
ships, and 62 alien masters and 272 alien of- 
ficers on steamships, but I say that under 
present conditions there ought to be none. 
Whatever may be necessary with regard to 
the crew, it would be perfectly simple to make 
it an absolute condition to flying the British 
flag that the ship should be adequately of- 
ficered, and officered by British subjects. The 
Admiralty have recently, and I think very 
properly, taken steps to use our merchant 
fleet as the eyes of the navy. They have 
issued a form to steamship owners asking 
them to communicate with their captains and 
to arrange that in time of war information 
should be given as to the character of every 
vessel that is sighted. That may be of enor- 
mous importance, but, considering that _ when 
the Pilotage Bill was before the House, it was 
felt necessary to give special powers to the 
Admiralty to preclude alien officers who hold 
pilot certificates from certain pilotage dis- 
tricts, surely, it is equally necessary that the 
Board of Trade should collaborate with the 
Admirality in this matter of alien inasters. 
Pilotage into port is not the only thing of 
importance in time of a naval war. It is 
clearly of importance that the navy should 
have immediate information of foreign ves- 
sels sighted in certain waters. Such _ informa- 
tion at once communicated to the right peo- 
ple might be the ineans of saving us from 
naval disaster, or at any rate, of putting us 
in a very much better position than if we 
had not the information. It is not safe or 
wise or in accordance with the course taken 
by the Government under the Pilotage Bill 
that we should any longer allow the flying 
of the British flag by vessels with alien mas- 
ters and officers." 

Mr. Chairman, and Mr. Secretary, since that 
time the Board of Trade has issued rules that 
no man can become a master of a British ves- 
sel if he is of foreign parentage. 

Here is a letter that was received from a 
man of Norwegian birth. It is dated Hong 



Kong, the sixth month, second day of 1917. 
It is written to Captain Henry Taylor, who 
is a navigation teacher in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, and whose address is 510 Battery street, 
San Francisco. It reads: 
"Dear Sir: I 

Having been given your address by a friend, 
I hereby beg to ask your advice and informa- 
tion about getting a position in U. S. A. 

I am Norwegian, 30 years of age and hold- 
ing a Norwegian master's certificate also Brit- 
ish first mates (ord). and S. African Coast- 
wise Masters' Certificate. I came out from 
London, July, 1914, for above named company 
as second mate on a three years' agreement, 
and was promoted to first mate after sixteen 
months and have been in my present ship 
since. 

I have all the time been getting on very 
well with the Superintendents and Masters and 
I fully intended to stay here, till this new B; 
O. T. regulation came out that no man born 
of foreign parents could take command of 
a British ship, so now, of course, it will be 
only waste of time for me to stay on after 
my agreement is up. 

I spoke to the U. S. A. Consul General in 
Hong Kong sometime ago and he advised me 
strongly to go across to Frisco, as they were 
very short of men just now, but hearing about 
you as a leading man in those matters over 
there I would not take any steps till I got 
your opinion. I also talked the matter over 
with our Superintendent here in Hong Kong, 
who said that if I saw any chance of better- 
ing myself the company would not stand in 
my way at all but they would be pleased to 
give the best possible reference for the time 
I had served them. 

Previous to joining the C 2 I was for nearly 
six years mate of big sailing vessels (saltpeter 
ships) so I have a pretty good all round 
experience. 

Anxiously awaiting your answer, I remain, 
sir, 

Yours sincerely, 

ALLE A. WARILD. 
Care Butterfield & Swire, 
Slianghai, China. 

P. S. — If you think it would be to my ad- 
vantage to come at once, please cable Warild, 
Swire, Shanghai." 

Mr. Chariman, and Mr. Secretary, that was 
turned over to me to answer, by Captain 
Taylor. I answered it. I told him that I 
would advise him not to come unless he 
thought he would like our form of Govern- 
ment and our institutions: that it would be 
necessary for him before he could sail on an 
American vessel to become a citizen of the 
United States. I told him that I did not be- 
lieve in any man becoming a citizen of the 
United States for convenience sake, but if a 
man liked our form of government and our 
institutions, then he was welcome, but not 
otherwise. That was the information that I 
gave him. (Applause). That was the infor- 
mation I gave him upon that point, because 
Mr. Chairman, and Mr. Secretary, and gentle- 
men, I have had a great deal of experience 



^ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



in the'jhatter of citi2cnship for convenience 
sake. If I do say so myself, 1 do not believe 
that there . is any man in the United States 
who is more competent to speak upon that 
particular question than I am. I put in sev- 
eral years making a study of that matter, and 
I .want to show you, Mr. Chairman, and Mr. 
Secretary, what it means. I believe that we 
should keep our ships running, but I believe 
that \vc should keep them running with Am- 
erican citizens on board. I believe we should 
give the •.American boy the chance to go to 
sea. I believe the solution of the problem is 
what the Secretary of Commerce stated to you 
— give them good quarters, and then you will 
get them. (.Applause). 

Mr. Chairman, and Mr. Secretary, and gen- 
tlemen, I trust that I may not be required to 
use any names here. I dislike to say what 
I am about to say. Here is a copy of a letter 
which was received by our late Secretary, 
dated March 10, 1915. I want to say, in this 
connection, Mr. Chairman, that it does not 
only take in one nationality, but it takes in 
everyone, according to my investigation, as 
many of all classes have obtained their citizen- 
ship for convenience sake only. However, his 
speaks about one particular nativity. I want 
to say for my part that I am willing to take 
by. the hand every man, I care not what his 
nationality, if he becomes a good citizen in 
good faith. Under those conditions, I am 
ready to take him by the hand and say, "You 
are as good an .American citizen as I am," but 
not otherwise. This letter is an indication of 
what it may mean to trust the honor of our 
flag to a man who becomes a citizen for con- 
venience sake. It is dated Melbourne, March 
10, 1915, and it reads: 
"My Dear Ducrrbeck: 

Got it into my head that I would drop you 
a few lines and let you know how things 
are going with us. We had a tine trip down 
until 10 deg. north of the line when we ap- 
proached a hurricane which delayed us three 
days having had to turn back three times, 
and from there on fine again, arriving in 
Sydney on the 27th day out. We were 10 
days there, all of which time the Capt. was 
in the hospital with rheumatism only return- 
ing on board day before leavmg for New- 
castle and after arriving in latter place he 
again returned to Sydney, which left me en- 
tirely to myself. _ 

We could get no freight here when ready 
so we took 2800 tons coal stiffening for Val- 
pariso, but on completion of our loading were 
held up by the Government and at the end 
of our third week were chartered to load wool 
for Boston and New York, so now we arc 
here at this port, having arrived yesterday and 
are discharging the coal preparatory to taking 
on the wool. At Newcastle the Government 
authorities took two men from us (Germans), 
didn't know that they could come on board 
a neutral ship and do that. Were I master 
I'd look well into it, but this man being a 
Britisher in every way took no interest and 
let them go, and now here they are inves- 
tigating a few more, the boatswain included, 
who has been with me for the past 15 years, 
and if they take him. . . . I'll try to^ have 
the papers take it up when I get back. 'Twas 
for that we had war with Great Britain m 
18i'2. This skipper is one of the finest men 
I ever sailed with and such a treat after hav- 
ing been with such company on the "Aztic," 
leaves everything to me, etc., but he is not 
an American and never will be. On our way 
around here he ordered me not to fly our 
flag while in Melbourne, and although it goes 
against my grain I've got to do it. 

Of course, there is an element of very bad 
feeling down here against our President, for 
they have an idea that at heart he is helpmg 
the Germans and there have been a few slurs 
thrown at the flag, but by ignorant people 
only and ... I'd flaunt it in their faces 
and would fly our largest flag had I the say. 
There is an example of what it is to have 
foreigners in command of our ships; they arc 
only there for the money in it and you should 
hear the remarks I've heard on this voyage 
by the Capt. and his wife, principally by the 
latter, who hates and despises anything con- 
nected with our flag and was very insultmg 
to' us at the table. I wish M. G. R. could 
have heard some of the conversation, they'd 
be a vacancy somewhere. Don't mention my 
name in connection with this. Regards to all 
inquiring friends and write to Boston in care 
White Star Line (our charterers). 
Sincerely." 

Upon the arrival, Mr. Chairman, of that 
ship in San Francisco, I investigated in con- 
nection with these terrible things that had 
been said, and I got this information from 
this -gentleman. I inquired in what way our 
flag was insulted while they were at the table, 
as referred to in the letter, and I was in- 
formed that the captain's wife, while a gen- 
eral conversation was being held between the 
captain, his wife, the chief engineer and the 
chief mate, had said, "Oh, dear, I wish this 
horrible war was over so we could have a 
flag to fly and not an old rag." The chief 
mate, said immediately that he was astonished 
to hear her say that, because her husband was 
a citizen, whereupon she answered that her 
husband only because a citizen for convenience 

That is a fact that I wished to bring to 



your attention, that our ships should be man- 
ned, by officers who obtain their citizenship 
because they love our form of government and 
our institutions, and not by men who obtain 
citizenship for the sake of convenience, as was 
the case here. 

I want to say that I know of another case. 
There was a gentleman who obtained citizen- 
ship papers, or declared his citizenship, in 
1887. In 1896, on June 4th. he joined the 
Naval Reserve. In 1903 he obtained full cit- 
izenship. I wrote to the Admiralty in Lon- 
don. I got an answer to the effect that the 
gentleman was a member of the Naval Re- 
serve, a lieutenant, seniority of June 4, 1896. 
That was after he had obtained his citizen- 
ship, for about si.x months after that I re- 
ceived that information. That is all I am go- 
ing to say on that subject, Mr. Chairman. I 
do believe, however, that the honor of the 
American flag should be entrusted to no one 
but citizens of this country. I want to say 
that I find among the men great loyalty, 
whether they be Norwegians, whether they be 
luiglishmen, or whether they be of other na- 
tionalities. It is true, however, that you will 
find lots of them that come here for con- 
venience sake, and what are you going to do 
in the case of trouble when you fill your ships 
up with men that you do not know anything 
about. I hope that that will be modified. I 
believe that America can furnish men both 
in the deck department and in the engine 
room and in the forecastle, men who do love 
our institutions and our form of Government. 

I want to say, Mr. Chairman, in regard to 
the shortage of men, that I believe if they 
would not permit the lower grades to go up 
so fast, there would not be any shortage, be- 
cause there is a large surplus of masters, a 
very large surplus of masters. You could put 
two masters, or a master and a chief mate 
on every one of these vessels, if you build 
1,500 more. I would like to suggest this: Take 
the men with experience, those who have had 
proper experience, those who have had three 
years at sea, and if it is necessary to ease up 
on anything, ease up on the educational re- 
fiuirements for the lower grades. Give them, 
if necessary, a provisional license to act as 
third mate for one year, and at the end of one 
year require them to take a regular examina- 
tion before they can get a regular license. 
That would give the service an opportunity 
to weed out those who are found to be incom- 
jictcnt. It would make it possible to dispense 
with those who had not proper experience and 
who were not fit men to be mates of a ves- 
sel. Some of these men, after they get to 
be mates, do not understand the upkeep of a 
vessel. You can take a boy, a landsman, we 
will say, for instance, and send him to school 
and then send him on board a ship as a 
third mate. When he becomes a mate, he is 
sometimes absolutely useless. I have seen 
these young men come from school ships, and 
after they would get on board a merchant ves- 
sel they would go to quartermaster and then 
go from quartermaster to third mate; from 
third mate to second mate; second mate to 
mate, and then they fall down completely be- 
cause they do not know how to look after 
the upkeep of the vessel. Of course, the own- 
ers insist upon having someone who can look 
after the upkeep of the vessels, as that is a 
very essential feature. Therefore, I do not 
believe any of these men should be given a 
license. If you wish to ease up, ease up on 
the educational part of the requirement. 

Mr. Chairman, Mr. Secretary, and gentle- 
men, I thank you very much. (Applause). 

Statement of Mr. F. M. White. 

Mr. White: I am a representative of the 
Shipmasters' Union of the United States of 
.America. Our headquarters are at Seattle, 
State of Washington. I did not think, gentle- 
men, when I received a summons from the 
institution that I represent that the whole bur- 
den of proof in this affair would lay with the 
Pacific Coast, but such seems to be the case. 
I just arrived from a voyage in the Mediter- 
ranean on a sailing ship,, and was not aware 
of the executive order that had been made 
admitting aliens to command American ships. 

I feci that anything I may be able to offer 
with regard to the status of American seamen 
will be very feeble indeed in the face of the 
able exposition delivered by my friend here. 
Captain Wescott, of San Francisco. 

There was one remark made by Captain 
Gibson, of Seattle, that I think is in error. I 
think that the impression Captain Gibson has 
concerning the scarcity of men on the Pacific 
Coast is in error. The little institution with 
which I am connected has but 160 members, 
liut every one of them holds a master's ocean 
license. They have confined their efforts here- 
tofore almost exclusively to the .Alaskan busi- 
ness, because that was the only place where 
there was any business or any chance for oc- 
cupation. 

We have ships sailing out of Seattle that 
have as high as four licensed ocean masters 
on board serving in the capacity of under of- 
ficers, mates, second mates, and third mates. 
It seems to me if a proper report were made 
to those men and they were informed that 
their services were required in other direc- 
tions, there would be no difficulty whatever 
in obtaining them. Of that I am quite con- 
fident. 



In regard to the executive order that per- , 
niits aliens to become masters of American • 
ships. . I cannot conceive for a moment that 
the President of the United States has been 
advised to issue such an order as that with i 
a full knowledge of the facts. This is a very ; 
grave condition of affairs tliat we are living ' 
under at this day. Perhaps I am in a position-' 
to realize it as thoroughly as any man in this 
assembly, if not more so, just having passed 
through the war zone in Europe. I hope sin- 
cerely that with the wisdom and the practical 
experience represented in this assembly here 
there will be some solution offered whereby 
there can be a modification of that executive 
order. 

We are intensely .American, this institution 
of ours; we are patriotic to a great degree. 
No matter whether this order is rescinded or 
not, no matter whether it is modified or not, 
it will not interfere for one moment with our 
patriotism or our loyalty to the Government 
of the United States. We will willingly serve 
in any capacity that we may be required to. 

I do not mean to intimate for one moment 
that Captain Gibson, who represents the own- 
ers' side of this question, would for an instant 
maliciously misrepresent the conditions. I 
think that he has been misinformed on the 
subject. 

As I said before, with regard to the status 
of the American seamen and the like. Captain 
Wescott has set the thing forth in such colors 
that wliatever I may say will be very feeble. 
I thank you for your attention. 

Secretary Wilson: May I ask Commissioner 
Chamberlain to make a statement at this time? 
Statement of Secretary Redfield. 

Secretary Redfield: Mr. Chairman, the state- 
ments made by the gentlemen who have just 
spoken here are a very great surprise to me. 
Nothing equivalent to them has been sub- 
mitted to any of the maritime services of the 
Department of Commerce within a consid- 
erable period. The information that we have 
received from different sources has been to the 
direct contrary. If the facts alleged by the 
gentlemen — and I do not question them at all 
— are the facts, it strikes me as extremely 
strange that those facts have not been brought 
to the attention of the department. 

I will ask Mr. Chamberlain, at my request, 
now, to state the situation as it is before us. 

I asked the President to sign that Executive 
Order. I did it because I believed and now 
believe it was a patriotic duty to do it, and 
that it would have been a most unpatriotic 
thing to do anything else. I did it because I 
believed and was informed and now believe 
and am informed that there is a serious pres- 
ent and likely to be a serious future shortage 
of officers and men on our ships, and because 
the importance of keeping the ships in move- 
ment is far and away above the interest of any 
men who happen to own ships in these days. 
The movement should not be delayed for a 
single hour by any personal questions of any 
kind whatever, because the safety of the na- 
tion requires otherwise. I am deeply inter- 
ested and much informed by what has taken . 
place, but I am anxious to hear the other side, 
because this information is novel and strange 
to mc. 

Mr. Chamberlain, will you state the facts as 
they are before us at this time? 

Address by Mr. Chamberlain. 

Mr. Chamberlain: At the outset, gentlemen, 
I want to say that it is absolutely necessary 
that we dismiss from our minds all considera- 
tions whatever of facts as they were before 
the war. The facts as they existed before 
1914, and the facts as they exist in 1917 are 
no more alike than are the facts that existed 
before the Christian era, and the facts of the 
])resent time. 

Up to the present time, or up to last year, 
I should say, the largest tonnage in the 24 
years with which I am familiar that we have 
ever turned out, was about 300,000 tons. Bear 
in mind that now we are taking over about 
6(X),000 tons of German and a few Austrian 
ships. In addition to that we are building — 
I cannot give the exact figure, under the very 
proper censorship regulations — but we are 
Iniilding a tonnage which, if I could state it, 
1 am quite sure would startle all of you gen- 
tlemen. In one month we have built more 
tonnage than we built in the first year or two 
when I came to Washington. In one month, 
mind you! At the present time we are build- 
ing, I will say, generally speaking, eight times 
what we have built before. In those figures 
I am not counting the program of the Ship- 
ping Board at all. The program of the Ship- 
ping Board, which is now under way, will 
have to be taken into consideration, of course. 
They arc dealing with deadweight tons, while 
our figures show the gross tons, with which 
you gentlemen are more familiar. However, 
the Shipping Board program, if carried out, 
will practically double the figures that I have 
given. 

It is well within the range of not only pos- 
sibility, but, in my opinion, it is highly prob- 
able, that during the twelve months upon which 
we have now entered, we shall have under our 
flag more new ships than the whole world built 
at any time up to the outset of the war. 

Now, conditions of that kind must be faced 
and met without delay. I believe in schools. I 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



"Guards" Not Necessary. 

Officials of the Virginian railroad an- 
nounce that no "guards" will be em- 
ployed to protect their property from 
alien enemies since the militia has been 
withdrawn. Government officials advise 
that guarding is not necessary. 

Editor Snyder of the West Virginia 
Federationist says : "I told you so," 
and points to the fact that the Federa- 
tionist repeatedly made this point in its 
fight against the act which created these 
deputies. 

"This announcement by government 
officials," says Editor Snyder, "knocks a 
hole in the argument advanced by the 
hysterical advocates of the special dep- 
uty system and bears out our contention 
that this system was conceived to be 
used as a strike-breaking agency and to 
hold the workers in subjection. This 
system is only an adjunct to the private 
guard system now maintained by the 
criminal corporations of the State and will 
be used in their behalf at the expense of 
the State. 

"If more attention was paid to the 
corporations and their private guards who 
daily violate the laws of the land it would 
not be necessary for public officials to 
lose so much sleep for fear of 'industrial 
disputes.' " 



I 



Employers Blamed for Omaha Turmoil. 

In a report to Governor Neville the 
Nebraska State Board of Mediation blames 
employers and the Business Men's Associ- 
ation for industrial turmoil in Omaha since 
the first of the year. The demands of the 
employes are declared "not unreasonable 
or excessive." 

The board investigated the causes for 
over a dozen disputes, lockouts and strikes. 

"Much testimony," reports the board, 
"was given by employes which tended to 
show that many employers would have 
settled with their employes if there had 
not been pressure brought by the Business 
Men's Association, and as no testimony 
was given by the other side to controvert 
them, we have been compelled to accept 
these statements as being true. 

"We are strongly of the opinion that 
the Business Men's Association and many 
of the employers will be advised by coun- 
sel not to aid us in our efforts, nor an- 
swer fully our quesions, and this being 
so, we see little to be gained by prolonging 
our investigation. We believe that some 
steps should be taken by Your Excellency 
or the State Counil of Defense to com- 
pel both parties to the controversy to live 
up to the spirit as well as the letter of the 
recommendations and requests made by 
the Secretary of Labor and so strongly 
approached by the President. From all the 
statements made to us on behalf of the 
employes and the testimony of a large 
number of them, we are convinced that 
labor stands ready to observe and obey 
the suggestions in their entirety. If there 
is any means whereby a similar agreement 
can be gotten from the employers — and 
both parties will live up to their promises 



— much may be done to relieve the present 
deplorable situation. 

"After a careful consideration of all the 
testimony, we are convinced that under all 
the circumstances, laborers' demands as to 
hours of labor, wages and improved work- 
ing conditions are not unreasonable or ex- 
cessive." 



Leather Workers on Eight-Hour Day. 

Quartermaster General Sharpe, United 
States army, has ordered the insertion in 
all Government contracts for the manu- 
facture of harness for the quartermaster 
corps a "supplementary clause requiring 
the observance of the provisions of the 
eight-hour law including time and one-half 
for overtime." 

Behind this announcement is a story of 
the persistence of W. E. Bryan, president 
of the United Leather Workers' Interna- 
tional Union, who has succeeded in having 
a contrary decision of the Acting Judge 
Advocate General of the War Department 
overturned. This has resulted in 4000 
workers employed on 280,000 sets of am- 
bulance harness being placed on an eight- 
hour day. 

The Judge Advocate General ruled that 
this style of harness does not come under 
the eight-hour law provision of 1912, as 
one section of this act exempts material 
the Government can purchase in the open 
market. President Bryan made the point 
that ambulance harness, made on Govern- 
ment specifications, can not be bought in 
the open market, and that the exceptions 
can not apply in this case any more than 
it can to ships, of which many are on the 
open market, but which are not built ac- 
cording to federal specifications. 

The ordnance department of the War 
Department recognizes the eight-hour day 
and for two years President Bryan has in- 
sisted that the Ouartennaster's Depart- 
ment of the War Department harmonize 
its contracts. The unionist's efforts have 
been blocked by the rule of the Acting 
Judge Advocate General, but logic and 
persistence finally triumphed. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



One Kind of Patriotism. 

"Seems it would be a difficult trick," 
says the Tacoma Daily News, "for Everett 
G. Griggs, president of the St. Paul and 
Tacoma Lumber Company, to consistently 
remain on the State Council of Defense 
and at the same time completely ignore 
the call of his country and the War De- 
partment to start his mill on an eight-hour 
day and produce some of that lumber 
which Uncle Sam so needs to carry on his 
part of the big scrap for democracy. The 
War Department appealed to the patriot- 
ism of the lumber barons but they ap- 
parently prefer to hold out for the old- 
fashioned, out-of-date ten-hour day, allow- 
ing the plants to rust and decay, caring 
never a rap how desperately in need of 
their products the country may be. It is 
truly a delicate position to occupy — mem- 
ber of the Council of Defense and a mem- 
ber of a class that refuses to help defend 
the country in its war!" 



International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions afifiliated with th« 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodornes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandschc Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandschc Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard-^ 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers 



Members of the Japanese Diet are 
agitating for an increase of salary 
from $1000 to $1500 per annum. 
High cost of living is given for the 
proposed increase. Ten years ago 
the salary was $400 per annum. 

At the prices prevailing in April, 
the cost of maintaining the standard 
pre-war budget of a typical Swed- 
ish household in the matter of food, 
fuel and light represents an in- 
crease of 3.1 per cent, upon the cost 
when based upon the prices pre- 
vailing in the preceding month, and 
of 75.3 per cent, over the cost in 
July, 1914. The "typical family" of 
the Swedish official statistician is 
one consisting of a man and wife 
and two children, and having an 
expenditure of about £111 per an- 
num. The above figures relate to 
the principal towns of Sweden taken 
together, but if the same budget be 
applied to Stockholm alone there is 
practically no change in the per- 
centage increase, which is 3.1 per 
cent, as compared with March, 1914, 
and 75.4 per cent, as compared with 
July, 1914. 

The "Rabochaya Gazeta" (Work- 
man's Gazette), of Petrograd, is a 
Social-Democrat organ. After de- 
scribing how the revolution was ini- 
tiated and maintained by workmen, 
and how it has led to the formation 
of a government predominantly mid- 
dle-class, it goes on: "There we 
have a repetition of what has fre- 
quently happened in European revo- 
lutions. Workmen have overthrown 
the old regime, and the new power 
has fallen into the hands of the 
Liberal bourgeoisie and Liberal dem- 
ocratic intelligence. ■ And this was 
inevitable in the present step of 
Russia's political and economic de- 
velopment. ' The working class is 
only part of the whole population. 
The democratic peasantry and the 
army, sprung therefrom, can share 
the political aims of the proletariat, 
but cannot follow it in its extreme 
economic demands. Before Russia 
lies a long period of bourgeois dem- 
ocratic development." 

Following is the general conclu- 
sion arrived at by the German De- 
partment of Labor Statistics as to 
the course of employment in Ger- 
many during June: ''The month of 
June affords the same satisfactory 
picture of strenuous and unweaken- 
ed activity as preceding months have 
done. In comparison with the cor- 
responding month of 1916 employ- 
ment during the period under review 
was at least at the same level, while 
in several cases increased outputs 
were reported. In mining and smelt- 
ing the activity of previous months 
was maintained; as compared with 
June, 1916, there was a further in- 
crease, though not everywhere to 
the same extent. The metal and 
engineering trades were employed to 
their utmost capacity. In certain 
branches of the electrical trades 
there was increased employment as 
compared with June, 1916. Sim- 
ilarly in the chemical trades there 
was also an increase over the cor- 
responding month of last year, vary- 
ing in degree in different places. 
Reports of varying character were 
received from the food and tobacco 
trades, some indicating increased 
and some decreased employment as 
compared with May. No change 
took place in employment in the 
building trades." 



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Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON. MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine. Sec-Treas. 



SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



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532 Beacon Street 
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Two Entrances 



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529;i BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
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south is the ideal place. Captain Frerichs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
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TERMS ARE REASONABLE ~~ 



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sixth and Beacon ^Street*, San Pedro, Gal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

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San Pedro Letter Liet. 



Anderson. Otto '^ 
Adler. H. • ' - 

Andree. E. A. -1410 
Abrahamson. A.- 
Andorsdn; Osk&r 
-Vndersen, Olaf 
Andersen, Prank 

-332 
Alexandersen. Paul 
Bergesen, Sivert 
Brown, G. 
Bertelsen, Bertel 
Billington, Martin 
Bulander, B. 
Brien, Hans 
Bentsen, Hans B. 
Christensen, A. 
Carlson, R. C. 
Carlson. Gustat 
Christensen, E. 
Pahlstrom, Ernest 
Dougal, A. 
Dreger, Jack 
Dalberg, O. 
Kklund. Swen 
Rmkow, Otto 
Eaton, Isaac 
Folvig, John 
Friberg, Peter 
Fosberg. Leonard 
Folvig. Ludvig 
Grigollt. Erd 
Gerhardt, John 
Gundersen. K. 
G.unnerud. Thorvald 
Gfrard. Albert 
Gunwald, . John 
Gusek, Bfen 
Heeshe. Henry 
Hoek, A. 
Hunter, Ernest 
Hoglund, J. A. 
Helinlus, Elnar 
Hagger, F. W. 
Hellman. Max 
Hedman, John M. 
Jakson. John H. 
Johanson, N. A. 
Johnson, John A. 
Johnson, Gunnar 
Johansen, Fred 
Jansson, Bernhard 
Karre. M. V. 
Krnn. H. 
Kruger, Gustaf 
Kallas, M. 
Kristensen, Niels 
Kalllo, Franz 
Kind. H. 
Lorentzen, Karl 
Lundquist, Ralph 
Lund. J. W. M. 
Livendahl, Gus 
Leideker, E. 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Labrentz. Max 



Laak.so, P. K -1411 
futZCTT, Valdemar 
Letch ford. A. 
Mokew, W. 
STagnussen, Sigurd 
Morris, Oscar 
Michaelsen, Matti 
Marion, J. 
Malmberg. Ellis 
Martensson, A. 
Mamers, Carl 
Miller, R. E. 
Metz. John 
Minners, Herman 
Moberg, Karl G. 
Nelson, Oscar 
Neskanin, Gus 
Nicolalsen. Hans 
Olsen, Tollef 
Olsson. O. S. 
Olsen, Ole W. 
Pera. GustI 
Petersen. Olaf 
Peterson. K. E. 

-903 
Paul, Peter G. 
Petersen. C. -1493 
Paulsen, James 
Pederson, John 
Peterson, Alfred 
Pedersen. Alf. -1323 
Palmquist, A. 
Peterson, Hugo 
Petterson, C. V. 
Petersen. N. -1234 
Petersen. John -1136 
Haau;n, Harry 
Rivera; John 
Rahlph, Th 
Retal. otto 
Raun, Elnar 
Swanson, James 
Sanders, Chas. 
Selewskl, Franz 
Schulze, Max 
Schroeder, Alfred 
Stensland. Paul 
Strahle, Chas. 
Selander, W. 
Thlrup, C. 
Tahtinen. HJ 
Tamml, E. 
Thompson. Maurice 
Thaysen, Arthur 
Thoren, G. A. 
Thompson, Alex 
Wlchman, 0. 
Warkala,- John 
Warkkala. John 
Ysberg. Adolf 

Packaaes. 
Bluker. John 
Kruger, Wm. , 
Rasmussen, Svend 
Novak. Andy 
Kramer, George 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Gust H. 
Bohm, Frank 
Brandt, Arvld 
P.ohni, Fra:nz 
Carlson, Chas. B. 
Carlera, Peter 
Dully, Alexander 
Elliot. Austin K. 
Fisher, Fritz 
Guldersen; E. 
Gregory, W. 
Geiger. Joe 
Harding, Ellis 
Hylander, Gust 
Hartnian. Fritz 
Iimey, Fred 
.lorgensen. Robert 
Jones. H. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
Johnson. Karl 
Jensen. H. T. 
Kaskincn. Albert 
Krlstenson, Wm. 
Krnon, .-M. 
Kpllv. Wm. 
Knofsky, E. W. 
I.aatzen. Hugo 
Larsen, Hans 



Mitchel, J. W. 
Mehctens, H. 
Nielson, Carl C. 
Nelson, I A. S. 
Olson, David . 
Okvist. Gust 
Oglive, Wm. 
Paulson, Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Paul. George 
Peterson. M. 
Palmqvist, Albert 
Petersen, Anton 

-1675 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rasmussen, O. 
Rubins. Carl A. 
Samuelson. Sam 
Stinesson. Harold • 
Slebert, Gust 
Swanson, Oskar 
Swanson, John I<. 
Tuhkanen, Johan J. 
Westengren. C. W. 
Wagner, W. M. 
Welllnger. L. 
Warren, Geo. 
Willing, Wm. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter Liet. 



Anderson. Chris. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andeson, A. P. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Berdwlnen. Bob 
Bleasing. W. 
Bohm. Gust 
Browen. Alexander 
Rrogard. N. 
Brun, Mattia 
Brant, Max 
Carlson. Adolph M. 
Crentz. F. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Dltrich 
Christensen, Louis 
Davis. Frank A. 
Donaldson. Harry 
Ekman. Gust 
Ellingsen, Erling 
Fattinger. August 
Fisher, Charley 
Frohne, Robert 
Gerard. Albert 
Graf, otto 
Grant, August 
Gray, William 
Gran, Aksel 
Gronlund. Oskar 
GroTOs, Oswald 

-«« 
Gueno, Pit© 
Gran, Axel 
Grag. William 
Hansen, Tborlelf 
Hs'naen, Jack 
Hansen, Max Owe 
Harley. Alex 
High, Edward 
Holmroos, Alln 
Hcdrick, Jack 
Jensen, L. 
Johansson, Arvo 
Johanssen, John F. 



Johnsen, Carl 
Johnson, Hans 
Johnson. Hllmar 
Kessa, Theo. 
Kord, Hjalmar 
Kreander, WIctor 
Kuldsen, John 
Llgoskl, Joe 
Lohtonen, Arthur 
Longren, Charley 
Malkoft, Peter 
Melners, Herman 
Meyers, George 
Nelson, Aug. 
Newman, I. 
Nielsen, Alf. W. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nllsen, Harry 
Olsen, Alf. 
Olsson, C. 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Peterson. Nels 
Pettersen, Carl 
Rahn, J. 
Risenius. Sven 
Rosenblad. Otto 
Sandquist. Gunnar 
Semith, Ed. 
Schenk. Albert 
Shemwall, Sigurd 
Sckultz, Bernt. 
Teuber, Rolf. 
Thorn. Alek. 
Thornland, John 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Waales, Edgar 
Wagner, Ed. 
Wedequist. Axel 
Williams. T. C. 
Williams. John 
Wolf, R. G. 

Packages. 
Billings, George 
EUingsen, Erling 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



I 



Western Spar Company is the name of a new 
•company organized at Portland for the purpose 
jpf specializing in the production of masts and 
■ booms for wood vessels. Booms and masts re- 
quire special treatment which the ordinary mill 
is not able to give. 

The Federal Shipping Board has applied to 
the San Francisco Board of Harbor Commis- 
sioners for a berth at which to dock the ves- 
sels that are on the way to this port from Ma- 
nila. The chief wharfinger was directed to pro- 
.vide a covered dock for the Government. 

The bark "St. Katherine" has left Unalaska 
-irt'tdw of the steamship "Port Angeles" for San 
Francisco, according to a dispatch to the marine 
department of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. The bark was ashore last May on 
the way to the Alaska salmon canneries, and 
last month was floated. The crew of the bark 
'■returned here on other salmon packets. 

C. D. Dunann, passenger traffic manager of 
the Pacific Steamship Company, handed his res- 
ignation- to the president of the company dur- 
ing the week, to take effect October 31. Du- 
nann intends to take a rest after service extend- 
ing over fifteen years with the old Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company and its successor, the Pa- 
cific Steamship Company. 

The ocean-going tugs "Undaunted" and 
"Dreadnaught" of the Rolph Navigation and 
Coal Company will be placed in service in 
about four weeks, according to information 
-from the Alameda plant of the Union Iron 
, Works, where the engines are being installed. 
The two big towboats were built in the north. 
They will be used principally in towing coal 
barges from Comox to this city. 

The sale of Admiral Dewey's former collier, 
the "Zafiro," now the British steamer "Bowler," 
-was confirmed by the receipt of a telegram 
from New York announcing that the French in- 
terests purchasing the craft had ratified the deal 
and paid over the purchase price. The "Bow- 
ler" is now being reconstructed into a twin- 
screw fnotorship at a British Columbia yard, 
and will be ready for commission soon. 

The newly-built steamship "Landaas" was 
launched on September 15 at the yards of the 
Northwest ■ Steel Company at Portland, Ore. 
Mrs. A. O. M. Bjelland, wife of the Consul for 
Norway, broke a bottle of champagne, whose 
source was not demanded by the dry squad, 
across the bows. The "Landaas" was originally 
laid down for a Norwegian firm, but was later 
sold to the Cunard line and finally taken over 
by the United States Government. She is 424 
feet long and of 54 feet beam. 

A lifeljoat from the wrecked steamship "Koto- 
hira Maru," containing Captain Haruhiko Shioga 
and sixteen of the crew, has arrived at Ikeda 
Bay, Queen Charlotte Islands, after being adrift 
forty-six days, according to dispatches from the 
north. The "Kotohira Maru" was wrecked 
July 27 on one of the Aleutian Islands, and it 
was feared the captain's boat had been lost. 
Chief Officer K. Matsudo and thirty-one of the 
crew reached an Alaskan port in a lifeboat three 
weeks following the wreck. Although the cap- 
tain's boat was well provisioned, the men suf- 
fered acutely from the exposure to the Arctic 
winds. The officers and seamen will return to 
Japan from Vancouver. 

The famous ship "Aurora," which was used 
by Sir Ernest Shackleton in his dash to the 
South Pole, is loading at Newcastle, Australia, 
with coal, for a voyage to the vvest coast of 
South America, according to a dispatch received 
at San Francisco. From the west coast it is 
expected the "Aurora" will come up the coast 
to San Francisco with a cargo for W. R. Grace 
& Co. The "Aurora" took the .Shackleton party 
from New Zealand to the Ross Sea on the 
start of the exploration of the South Pole 
regions. From Ross Sea the party went farther 
south in another vessel. On the return of the 
explorers the "Aurora" brought the party from 
the Ross Sea to New Zealand. 

Even the optimists among the local shipping 
fraternity have conceded the loss of the schooner 
"R. C. Slade," which left Sydney for San Fran- 
cisco 155 days ago to-day. The schooner, under 
Captain Holdon Smith and a crew of fifteen 
men, carried a cargo of copra for the Pacific 
Freighters Company. Little hope is also enter- 
tained here that the bark "Beluga," which to 
date has put in 133 days en route to Sydney, 
is still afloat. Neither vessel has been heard 
from since leaving their respective ports, and it 
is feared they will remain missing. The "Belu- 
ga," in charge of Captain Cameron, was loaded 
with case oil. The bark was an old-time wha- 
ling ship and is owned by W. O. Stevenson. 

The commandeering by the Government, 
through the Shipping Board, of the turbiners 
"Great Northern" and "Northern Pacific" means 
that the two big liners will be permanently lost 
to the Pacific Coast trade, according to the in- 
terpretation placed on the Shipping Board's tel- 
egram, announcing the taking over of the big 
ships. The telegram, which was received by 
President L. C. Gilman of the Great Northern 
Pacific Steamship Company, operating the liners, 
a copy of which was also sent to L. W. Hill, 



president of the Great Northern Railroad, part 
owner of the steamship line, says that "the 
titles in and to" the vessels are commandeered. 
This, according to the interpretation, means that 
the liners will be bought outright by the Gov- 
ernment. 

Travel to the Hawaiian Islands during the six 
months from January 1 to June 30, 1917, was 
consistently maintained, according to figures is- 
sued by the Hawaii Promotion Committee of 
Honolulu. The statistics show that, despite the 
war, more passengers arrived on steamers dur- 
ing this period than in the corresponding period 
of 1916. The number of persons arriving by all 
steamers at Honolulu (except interisland ves- 
sels) from January 1 to June 30, 1916, was 
6,247 and through passengers or those destined 
for ports other than Honolulu, such as Japan, 
China, Australia, British Columbia and conti- 
nental United States, totaled 9,509. The num- 
ber of persons arriving by all steamers from 
outside ports from January 1 to June 30, 1917, 
was 6,616 and the total of through passengers 
was 8,303. 

A deliberate attempt to hold up retail prices 
on salmon in defiance of the Food Administra- 
tion was unearthed by Federal investigators at 
Portland. Tons of fish have been destroyed 
which could have been sold at reasonable rates 
to consumers. It is estimated that between 
fourteen and twenty-four tons of fish have been 
thrown away, and this salmon, computed at 
15 cents a pound, represents between $4400 and 
$5670. A gasoline launch owned by a Portland 
fish buyer left Portland at night with several 
tons of salmon. The fish was dumped over- 
board in the river several miles above St. Hel- 
ens. The following few days many of these 
salmon were found rotting on tlie beaches. In- 
vestigation of this incident led to the discovery 
that salmon in great quantities had been des- 
troyed within the past few weeks. Dealers are 
keeping salmon at a minimum price of 20 cents 
a pound, except fall Columbia rivers, which sell 
for 15 cents. 

The ship brokerage firm of Thorndyke & 
Trenholme, of Seattle, has concluded the sale of 
the recently launched steamship "Rosewood," 
built by the Pacific American Fisheries Com- 
pany at South Bellingham, and which is soon 
to have her engines installed. The same French 
interests which purchased the tugs "Kingfisher" 
and "Arctic" and the steamers "Turret Crown" 
and "Bowler" are said to have consummated 
the deal for the "Rosewood." The latter craft 
is a wood construction ship of 2500 tons net 
register. She is 250 feet over all, with a keel 
length of 236 feet. Her beam is 42 feet and 
depth of hold 27.5 feet. Her cargo capacity is 
105,000 cubic feet, and unofficial measurements 
allow her to carry 1,600,000 feet of lumber or 
3000 tons of cargo. She also is equipped with 
cabin accommodations for ten first-class passen- 
gers, and Lloyd's and Bureau Veritas surveyors 
who have looked at the uncompleted vessel rate 
her as one of the best wooden ships ever built 
on the Sound. Her engines are being built by 
the Seattle Machine Works. The sale calls for 
delivery the latter part of October. 

The total number of ships making the transit 
of the Panama Canal during the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1917, in seagoing traffic was 
■1876. In the fiscal year 1916 the total was 787; 
in 1915, it was 1088. The aggregate gross and 
net tonnages of the 1876 ships in the year 1917, 
■according to the rules of measurement for the 
Panama Canal, were 8,530,121 and 6,009,358 tons, 
respectively. The cargo carried through the 
Canal amounted to 7,229,255 tons of 2240 pounds. 
Ships making the passage of the Canal without 
cargo, including naval ships and pleasure craft 
which did not carry cargo, as well as merchant 
ships in ballast, aggregated 284. Of these, 187 
were in transit from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 
and 97 from' the Pacific to the Atlantic; net 
tonnages were 574,881 and 219,907 respectively. 
The average net tonnage of all ships was 3203 
tons. The average net tonnage of the ships 
carrying cargo was 3275 tons. The average 
loading of the ships with cargo was 4541 tons 
of 2240 pounds. The ratio of tons cargo to net 
tonnage of ships with cargo was 1.386. As dis- 
tributed over the aggregate of traffic, for each 
of the 6,009,358 net tons that passed through the 
Canal there were handled 1.2 tons of cargo. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. _He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sut- 
ter 5807. (Advt.) 

"Silas B. Axtell (attorney for Seamen's Unions 
in New York), formerly attorney for The Le.gal 
Aid Society, announces that he has opened an 
office for the practice of law and for the ex- 
clusive use of seamen. Consultation and advice 
free of charge. Suits under the La Follette Act 
for half wages; actions for damages for injuries 
on account of accident, etc., given prompt atten- 
tion.": (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated ■with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 
FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broad-way Street 

NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 
51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 T-wenty-thlrd Street 

MOBILE, Ala ..A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JOHN BERG, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHRODER, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex ...JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY 12 South Street 

Telephone 2107 Broad 

New York Branch 514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass 6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La 228 Lafayette Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 806 South Broadway 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 206 Moravian Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 231 Dock Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 220 Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass 168 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 54 Commercial Place 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency; 

GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 

Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 65 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 47 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, Mich 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

CONNEAUT, 022 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - - Jl.OO 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dre.=s all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1917. 



A NATIONAL MARITIME SPIRIT. 



According to an English exchange, just 
received, arrangements are now being made 
in that country for the distribution of the 
silver war badge to officers and seamen of 
merchant ships who, by reason of wounds 
received through enemy action or by reason 
of illness attributable to war service, are 
compelled to give up their employment in the 
mercantile marine. Arrangements have been 
made for publishing from time to time a 
roll of honor for the mercantile marine, giv- 
ing the names of officers and men who have 
lost their lives owing to enemy action or 
have been taken prisoner. A history will be 
written of the part played by the mercantile 
marine in the war by a well-known writer. 
The work has already been commenced and 
the writer will have full access to official 
records. 

Similar work, giving credit where credit 
is due, might well be taken up by our own 
Government. The essential and all impor- 
tant work done by the "common" American 
merchant seaman during the present war is 
but little appreciated because it is not un- 
derstood by the great mass of Americans. 

In order to re-establish a genuine Amer- 
ican merchant marine there must be a res- 
toration of a National maritime spirit not 
only in our sea ports but in the cities, towns 
and hamlets of the interior as well. The 
foundation for a great American-manned 
merchant marine was laid by the enactment 
of the Seamen's law. A further impetus was 
given by the war and the resulting realiza- 
tion that the very future of our country 
demands a mercantile fleet, American-owned 
and American-manned. 

The right kind of publicity should help 
wonderfully and work of the character now 
planned in England might well be taken up 
in our own country. It should help in bring- 
ing us nearer the goal: The creation of an 
American-built and American-manned mer- 
chant marine, second to none in the world! 



SHIPPING BOARD ESTIMATES. 



The estimates recently submitted by the 
Shipping Board to the Secretary of the 
Treasury call for over $1,000,000,000 with 
which to complete the shipbuilding program 
for this year, and embrace as the major 
part of the expense a total of 1270 ships, or 
a 7,068.000 tonnage. This is in addition to 
2,000,000 tons of shipping now building in 
American yards, which has been com- 
mandeered by the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration. It is said that a large part of 
the Government fleet and of the com- 
mandeered fleet will have been completed 
by the end of the fiscal year, June 30, 1918. 

Estimates of the entire cost of construction 

are given as follows : 

Contracts already let, 433 ships, of 1.919,200 
tons, $285,000,000; contracts ready to let, 452 
sliii)s. of 2,968,000 tons, $455,500,000; under nego- 
tiation, 237 ships, of 1,281,000 tons, $194,000,000; 
150 miscellaneous vessels of 1,800,000 tons, $300,- 
000,000, and construction of Government-owned 
fabricating yards, $35,000,000. 

Commandeering will cost $515,000,000. and 
purchase of ships, $150,000,000. The board 
already has received for construction $550,- 
000,000, and for commandeering $250,000,000. 

The board now desires authorization to 
.spend for construction, $719,500,000; for 
commandeering, $265,000,000, and for pur- 
chases. $150,000,000. The appropriation 
asked to carry the board through the fiscal 
year is divided as follows : Building, $400,- 
000,000; commandeering, $265,000,000. and 
purchases, $150,000,000. 

Some 120 ships will be removed from the 
lakes to the Atlantic before the winter sets 
in. Of these more than 70 will have to be 
cut in half to be put through the Welland 
Canal. All the ships total more than 350,000 
tonnage. The Shipping Board's plan is to 
retain these ships, replacing them on the 
lakes next spring with vessels to be built in 
lake ports during the winter. 

Requests of certain financiers to build in 
American yards a large number of vessels 
for foreign fla,gs have been turned down. 
Under the shipping law no ship construction 
contracts can be entered into without the 
permission of the board. 

Finally, it is known that the Shipping 
Board will make an early move toward re- 
ducing ocean freight rates. 

The net results of freight-rate fixing can- 
not be easily anticipated. In any considera- 
tion of this subject operating expenses are 
an important factor. And operating ex- 
penses, which include wages, will not re- 
main stationary with the cost of living soar- 
ing higher and higher. 



"57 VARIETIES." 



Says Editor Frey, of the International 

Molders" Journal : 

No other group, except our own, is compe- 
tent to speak for the trade-union movement at 
this time, and no trade-unionist is competent 
to speak authoritatively until the trade-union 
movement itself, through conference and con- 
vention, has adopted an official attitude. An 
examination of some of the hasty, undigested 
expressions of policy which have been expressed 
by some local members of trade unions here 
and there throughout the country would lead a 
person, who was not better informed, to be- 
lieve that the trade-union movement had "57 
varieties" of policy in connection with the pres- 
ent tremendous problems which face both trade- 
unionism and the country. There must be unity 
of purpose and unity of action if we are to 
succeed in making our movement the power 
which it should be in the present crisis. 

This is comment well taken and right to 
point. 

The last convention of the American Fed- 



eration of Labor did not mince any words 
on the subject of militarism. The report of 
the special committee on militarism was 
both clear and concise. It certainly set forth 
the views of the "authorized representatives" 
of the American labor movement, for it re- 
ceived the unanimous vote of the convention. 

Later, when it became evident that our 
country would become involved in the world 
war there was a conference of all the exec- 
utives of the National and International 
unions comprising the American Federation 
of Labor. This conference again set forth 
the position of the American labor move- 
ment. It was a conference composed of 
authorized spokesmen for organized labor. 

Now we have just had another kind of 
conference claiming to speak in the name 
of labor. It was composed of at least 57 
varieties of parlor socialists, prohibitionists, 
trade-unionists and others. True, it was 
called by Messrs. Gompers and Morrison, 
but no one who pretends to be fair would 
call it a truly representative conference of 
the American trade-union movement. If the 
executive officers of the A. F. of L. had 
been desirous of holding a really representa- 
tive labor conference to formally assure the 
President that Labor is loyal, they certainly 
had it in their power so to do. Instead 
they stuflfed their meeting with all shades 
and varieties of highbrows. Then they 
talked and resoluted and declared in effect 
that any one who disagreed with them was 
necessarily either a fool or a knave, most 
likely the latter. 

Mr. Gompers probably had his own good 
reasons for holding his personally conducted 
highbrow conference. But with all due re- 
spect to him and his high position we must 
agree with the declaration in the Molders' 
Journal that "no other group, except our 
own, is competent to speak for the trade- 
union moveinent at this time." 



Enormous war profits have been made by 

big corporations engaged in making war 

supplies. Below is shown the profits for 

twelve concerns in 1916. It is estimated the 

profits for this year will be much larger: 

United States Steel Corporation. $207,945,953; 
Bethlehem Steel Corporation, $53,715,041; Ana- 
conda Copper Mining Company, $39,087,187; 
Utah Copper Company, $32,174,480; .Xmerican 
Smelting and Refining Company, $11,158,084; E. 
I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., $76,581,729; 
General Chemical Company. $9,700,191; Central 
Leather Company, $12,016,397; .-Xmcrican Sugar 
Refining Company, $4,211,408; Republic Iron and 
Steel Company, $11,687,863; Standard Oil Com- 
pany of New York, $20,425,510; Corn Products 
Refining Company, $3,798,892. 

Senator La FoUette would take 80 per 
cent, of these profits. But Senator La 
Follette is in the minority just now. With 
him are Hiram W. Johnson and a few 
others. Is it conceivable that they will re- 
main in the minority for any length of time? 



The disposition to indulge in personalities 
in the treatment of trade-union aflfairs is a 
proof of that egotism that puts the individ- 
ual above the mass. The egotist should re- 
member that even if all the charges against 
the other fellow were true, it would make 
no difference in the end. The trade union, 
being grounded upon the necessities of the 
workers' existence, will pursue its way se- 
rene, indifferent, oblivious to individual per- 
fection or frailty. 



Give yourself and your fellow worker a 
square deal by spending your union-earned 
money for products bearing union's trade- 
mark of freedom — the Union Label. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



GETTING ON THE LAND. 



Having rejected taxation reforms as 
championed by Henry George, the State of 
California is now ready to start its new 
land-settlement system, enacted at the last 
session of the Legislature. Under the plan 
about to be tried a young man with but 
little capital can nevertheless make a start 
in life as an independent farmer, cultivating 
a farm he himself owns, with anywhere 
from twenty to thirty-six years to pay for 
his land. 

As the first step, the State Land Settle- 
ment Board has announced that it is now 
ready to purchase from four to six thousand 
acres of farm land, the Board then to im- 
prove, subdivide, and settle this land. 

When this has been done, the Board will 
sell it on small initial payments with 20 to 
36 years to pay the balance and will create 
a colony devoted to mixed farming, in which 
rotation of crops, the growing of livestock, 
and the maintenance of the soil's fertility 
will all be assured. Before the land is se- 
lected Dean Thomas F. Hunt of the Uni- 
versity of California College of Agriculture 
will report on the suitability of the tracts 
submitted for closer settlement, and the 
President of the State Water Commission 
will report on the water rights pertaining to 
the lands offered or to be purchased with 
them. 

In purchasing the land selected, the Board 
will contract with the owners to make a cash 
payment of five per cent., then to begin 
immediate subdivision and improvement of 
the property, using whatever is necessary of 
the State appropriation of $260,000. The 
land will then be opened for settlement, and 
as settled a cash payment of 45 per cent, 
of the purchase price of the settled portion 
will be made to the vendor. The remainder 
due to the vendor will be paid in amortised 
payments, extended over a period varying 
from 20 to 36 years with interest at five 
per cent, per annum on deferred payments. 
The Board will undertake to collect interest 
and principal on all deferred payments, and 
in case of default, to complete the payments 
to the vendor and take over the property. 
The privilege will be reserved of paying off 
all indebtedness at any time within 36 years. 

This great new undertaking in California 
is the first time in America that such a land 
settlement policy has been introduced. Al- 
ready it has made a memorable success in 
Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, Ireland, 
and a score of other countries. 

To-day more than a third of the farms in 
the United States are cultivated by tenants, 
and only two-thirds by those who them- 
selves own the land. This deplorable ten- 
dency toward a system of tenant farmers is 
growing rapidly worse. To rescue for 
America the opportunity for young farmers 
to be independent landowners, instead of 
tenants, is the great work which the new 
system will achieve. Its inauguration in 
California, for the first time in the United 
States, has already won for the State praise 
from economists and experts in social prob- 
lems in all parts of the United States. Leg- 
islation is now pending in Congress for the 
adoption as a federal policy, in connection 
with the Reclamation Projects, of this land 
settlement system, proved sound and success- 
ful by the experience of a score of dififerent 
countries, but in which California is now 
pioneering for the rest of the country. 



PITCAIRN ISLAND PEOPLE HAPPY. 



Simple Ways, Community Work, Queer Lan- 
guage and Odd Customs That Prevail on 
Isolated Strip in Pacific Ocean. 



"I wish the multitudes outside were as intelli- 
gent as these people on the great, fundamental 
truths," writes a missionary from Pitcairn Is- 
land, the small solitary strip of volcanic land 
out in the Pacific Ocean. "Even the children 
are particularly interested in the war, because 
they have learned to trace the various kingdoms 
now involved in the conflict from prophetic 
history and are very intelligent with respect 
to Turkey's position in its relation to prophecy. 
The women have equal rights with the men in 
all municipal affairs; neither tobacco nor strong 
drink is countenanced, and the people are very 
temperate in their habits of eating and drinking. 

"Numbers of beautiful boys and girls just 
budding into manhood and womanhood, bright 
and intelligent, and just as capable of doing 
their part in the world as anyone outside, 
settle down, however, to indolence, happy and 
contented, since their environment is such that 
no matter how ambitious they may be or how 
higli their aspirations, there is nothing for them 
to do. Much of the valuable education they re- 
ceive is lost because they do not need it. 

"The church school, which is the only school 
on the island, is conducted five days in the 
week, beginning on Sunday. Reading, writing, 
spelling, arithmetic, grammar, geography, his- 
tory and Bible are taught. The grades are 
from one to six. The children, as well as the 
adults, are fond of music and singing, and with 
but few exceptions learn very rapidly. Twelve 
music pupils gladly share one organ and the 
single available instruction book. 

"Although they speak English fluently and 
well, the islanders use it only when talking to 
visitors or the missionaries. For general use 
they have a 'gibberish' of their own, wliich 
appears to be a perversion of both English 
and Tithesian. For instance, instead of saying 
'Take your bath' they say 'You go narvic'; 
instead of 'What is that thing?' they say 'What 
liar thing?' 'Orange tree' or 'palm tree' are 
called "Tree orange' or 'Tree palm.' It is 
amusing to hear even little children just be- 
ginning to talk address their grandparents by 
Christian names. This is unavoidable, for if 
one were to call 'Mr. Young' about a dozen 
persons would respond. It often happens that 
young people marry without changing their 
names. All the marriages, by the way, are 
conducted by the Government. This does not, 
however, prevent a church service after the civil 
announcement of the marriage. 

"Every rock and hill on the island has its 
name. In inquiring about a particular location 
one expects these unusual people to motion or 
point in the proper direction, but instead they 
use its name, just as we would that of a 
suburb of a city. Certain rocks are called 
'Isaacs.' Here among the rocks are delightful 
pools, some quite deep, where everybody learns 
to swim. 

"You may wonder how the children find 
amusement without parks, beaches or public 
amusements, but happier children could not be 
found anywhere. They climb trees and caper 
up and down the hills looking for wild flowers 
or fruit such as mountain apples, rose apples 
and givavah. They, spend long hours looking 
for shells in the pools and basins of the rocks, 
and, when it is raining, in rolling and splashing 
in the mud. 

"The women are usually about five feet in 
height, with rounded muscular figures and some 
have beautiful eyes and hair, and pretty teeth 
and hands. The complexion of the majority is 
dark, mainly through exposure to the hot sun. 
A few, however, are quite fair, and have golden 
hair. They are very careful of their best clothes 
and are particular to have them neat and clean. 
They are proud, and even vain. In common 
with womankind the world over, they have a 
peculiar fondness for hats, and make very 
pretty ones from the palm leaves, pumpkin vine 
and sugar-cane leaves, and from_ the straw of 
which our common house broom is made. They 
dress .usually in loose garments made with 
square yokes, although they are fond of change 
and like to have skirts and blouses. Corsets, 
shoes and stockings are seldom worn. In mid- 
winter, however, those who are fortunate enough 
to have shoes are glad to don them. The 
boys vie with each other with respect to dress 
and appearance. All have a fondness for white- 
starched suits, and like to march, keeping step 
like soldiers. 

"The long narrow houses on the island 
are in many ways superior to those of the 
natives on other islands. Most of them have 
thatched roofs, although some are covered with 
iron roofing. All are lined. The sitting room 
is in the center of the house, all the bedrooms 
opening into it. The father and mother of a 
family usually occupy dififerent rooms at each 
end of the house. The kitchens and dining 
rooms do not adjoin the dwelling: houses, on 
account of the smoke and heat. There are no 
chimneys to their fireplaces, and the kitchens 
are always black with smoke. This is the only 
really undesirable feature about the homes. 
Bath rooms are also detached. Everyone is 
cleanly about his person, and indulges in a 
daily bath. The homes, however, are sadly 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



OFFICIAL 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 24, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 1 p. 
m., Joe Faltus presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping good. The sum of twenty-five dollars 
was donated to the striking candy girls 6i Se- 
attle, Wash.; seventy-five dollars was also do- 
nated to the striking street carmen of San 
Francisco. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 
Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 17, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

WILLIAM HASTINGS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 17, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping fair. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. TeL Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
Shipping slack; prospects uncertain. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
.Shipping medium. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^/4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 11, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping good. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 20, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping fair; men are getting 
more plentiful. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 13, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; scarcity of 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 13, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; not many mem- 
bers ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128^ 6th St. Phone Home 
115, Sunset 335. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; prospects poor. 
THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



DIED. 

Peter Ballad, No. 995, a native of Russia, age 
49, died at -San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 17, 1917. 



Papers were signed at Tacoma recently where- 
by the Foundation Co., of New York, acquire;; 
a fifty-acre tract for the purpose of erecting a 
plant for the construction of ships for the 
French Government. The organization plans to 
build from ten to twelve ships at a time, the 
site being capable of ways installations to that 
extent. Franklin Remington, of New York, is 
president of the company. The directors arc 
New York, Chicago and Montreal men. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



President Moyer of the International 
Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, 
with Ed. Crough, who has been organizer 
for that union and its predecessor, the 
Western Federation of Miners, in Arizona 
for the past fifteen years, have arrived here 
to help John Murray carry on the fight 
for the copper strikers in the Southwest. J. 
C. Lowney of Butte, representing the cop- 
per strikers in Montana, is with them. Some 
important developments in the war between 
the Copper Trust and the Labor Movement 
are on the way. 

On the morning of their arrival, ]\Ioyer 
and his two associates witnessed a dramatic 
scene in the office of President Gompers of 
the American Federation of Labor. Indeed, 
they took part in the last stages of the 
affair, much to their satisfaction. 

For more than a week there had been 
hanging around the offices of Senator 
Ashurst and Congressman Hayden of Ari- 
zona a delegation of "citizens of Bisbee" 
whom the faithful statesmen had taken to 
see President Wilson, the Secretary of 
Labor, the War Industries Board and other 
officials. They claimed that they were 
here to help keep the price of copper up 
to 25 cents, in order to keep up the price 
of labor in the copper mines. 

On Thursday morning eight of these 
"citizens" appeared at the office of Mr. 
Gompers, saying that they wanted, while 
in the city, to "pay their respects to the 
ablest labor leader in America." It hap- 
pened that when they came in they found 
Moyer and his associates there, together 
with Secretary Morrison, James Egan, and 
Grant Hamilton of the general staff of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

It was soon made evident that the eight 
vigilantes had come to try to make terms 
with Mr. Gompers so that they might get 
more favorable consideration from the War 
Industries Board in the fixing of the price 
of copper, while at the same timft they 
were not going to permit the return to the 
"conquered territory" of Bisbee of the union 
men whom they had seized, kidnaped and 
deported early in July. They hoped that 
Mr. Gompers would believe that the Loyalty 
Leagues of Arizona, which have outlawed the 
union miners, had some connection with the 
general loyalty movement to which Mr. 
Gompers is giving so much of his attention. 
By chance, the president of the American 
Federation of Labor was just starting for 
Chicago to address a loyalty meeting there 
with Elihu Root, when detained for this in- 
terview. 

For some twenty minutes the Bisbee dele- 
gation talked, declaring that all union men 
not connected with the I. W. W. were per- 
fectly free and welcome to come back. They 
"regretted the mistake" through which .^00 
American Federation of Labor card men 
were deported and kept in the stockade at 
Columbus, N. M., until released to find new 
jobs in other places. They said they wanted 
to be considered good friends of labor. They 
wanted peace. They wanted to "clarify the 
situation." 

John Murray, sent here recently as its 
spokesman by the Arizona State Federation 
of Labor, and holding also the position of 
organizer for the American Federation of 
Labor, finally came in, and interrupted the 



Bisbee crowd. Gompers asked him if he had 
anything to say. 

Murray glanced around and pointed to 
two of the strangers. "That man," he .said, 
"and that one, were among the gunmen with 
deputy sheriff's badges on them, that held 
me up with guns, when our committee with 
credentials from the State Federation of 
Labor tried to go into Bisbee to investigate 
the deportations. That man there, when I 
showed him my credentials and a telegram 
from the Governor of Arizona, told me to 

'Get the h out of here ; we have had 

enough rag-chewing.' " 

The gunmen never even lowered their eyes. 

At this moment Mr. Gompers was obliged 
to leave, to catch his train, and Secretary 
Morrison led the men into the executive 
council room, where they talked for an hour 
longer. Organizer Crough recognized the 
spokesman of the eight vigilantes as a man 
who had held a gim up against him during 
the strike of three years ago. The gunman 
offered no denial. 

Nothing came of the talk, except a feeling 
of utter astonishment on the part of the 
labor officials that the gunmen should have 
had the brazen effrontery to come to .'\meri- 
can Federation of Labor headquarters. 

Had they known it, at the ver\' hour that 
Murray was tongue-lashing these "citizens" 
for their crimes against law and common 
decency in Bisbee, a crowd of their fellow 
Leaguers were "arresting" thirty-three of the 
exiled strikers who had reached Douglas, 
twenty-five miles from Bisbee, on their at- 
tempted return to their homes. 

It may not be generally known, but it is 
a fact, that the commanding officer of the 
Federal troops at Globe, Arizona, in a special 
announcement published for several days in 
the Globe Record, declared that he and his 
force would protect all men returning to 
work in the struck mines, and that they 
would prevent the holding of public meet- 
ings meant to "encourage men to remain in 
idleness." Some days earlier, the copper 
company papers in Arizona had published a 
telegram from Mr. Gompers, which they 
falsely claimed was an "endorsement" of 
the Loyalty League scheme. At the same 
time they were assuring all workers who 
were forced to submit to the Loyalty League 
yoke that if they successfully passed the 
examination for traveling cards of the 
League, these cards would be "rustling 
cards," good for jobs in Bisbee or any other 
camp in Arizona, New Mexico, Utah or 
Nevada where Loyalty Leagues had been 
established. The examination deals, as might 
be suspected, with the question of whether the 
worker is a union sympathizer. .'Xnd any 
such sympathizer is promptly denounced as 
an I. W. W., and run out of town. 

Reports made by Gila Valley Lodge, I. .'\. 
M., at Miami, Arizona, to the International 
.\ssociaton of Machinists, show that the one 
man in the Arizona labor movement who 
has been most outspoken against the I. W. 
W. at all times — Tom Corra, secretary of 
the Mining Trades District Council at Globe 
— is being denounced and slandered in these 
company papers as an "Austrian I. W. W." 
Editorials, claiming that Mr. Gompers has 
"decreed" that all union men should join the 
Loyalty League, end up by suggesting that 
only I. W. W. influence can explain their 
unwillingness to join, and that anything that 
stops the I. W. W. is good, "including hang- 
ings." 



Mr. Gompers has sent out a flat denial 
that he ever endorsed or condoned the law- 
less Loyalty League activities, but his denial 
is ignored by the Leaguers and their press. 

Murray is still hopeful that President Wil- 
son will get time soon to name the com- 
mission which is to investigate the Arizona 
industrial war. 

* * * 

Overthrow of the Kornilofif revolt in Rus- 
sia, which seems to have been backed by the 
biggest propertied interests with a view to 
protecting their holdings against the radical 
government, has been swiftly followed by a 
demand on the part of the joint council of 
workmen, soldiers and peasants' delegates for 
the "abolition of private property." Further 
details of the plan these actual lawmakers of 
Russia have in mind indicate that they want 
all of the landed estates divided among the 
peasants who live on the land and cultivate 
it. They want the factories and railroads 
and other industries to be made national 
property, to be administered under a manage- 
ment to be elected by the workers in each 
industry. They want the private holdings 
of money, real estate and all other forms of 
wealth to be taxed away to the point where 
all Russians must perform useful service. 

Their demand for democratic management 
of the industries, with collective ownership, 
is echoed by the growing radical element of 
the French and British labor movements, as 
a step toward democratic control of the poli- 
cies of both industry and foreign trade, which 
in turn will control the forces which make 
for war. 

These sweeping demands in Russia are not 
likely to be realized during this war. In- 
stead they will arouse new and severe in- 
ternal quarrels in Russia. But they point 
which way the Russian working class is 
moving. For that reason the governments of 
the entente nations are likely to be more 
concerned over the fact that they have been 
made by a great majority of the revolutionary 
lawmakers, than over the fact of Korniloff's 
revolt. They are demands which would up- 
set the whole social systems of the Central 
and the Entente powers alike, were they to be 
taken up by the labor movements of Europe 
generally. More than ever, we shall hear 
the Russian workman cursed an an enemy 
to the success of the Allied cause. Certainly 
he is trvingf to shift the lines of this war. 



"UPLIFTERS" REBUKED. 



The People's Council fiasco which de- 
veloped as a result of its suppression by 
the authorities in various States has been 
matched by the failure of the opposing or- 
ganization, engineered by President Gom- 
pers of the American Federation of Labor, 
to secure more than a mere handful of 
delegates. The whole thing merely shows 
that organized labor is attending strictly 
to its business of getting better living and 
working conditions for the working class 
and letting the "uplifters" worry about 
their own affairs. — Seattle Union Record. 



It is paradoxical but true that were it not 
for the establishment of the minimum wage 
all wages would be down to the lowest pos- 
sible point. 



It is rather unfortunate that the laws 
against infanticide were established before 
the crime of child labor had become an issue. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR NATURAL RESOURCES. 

(By Scott Nearing.) 



This generation realizes with difficulty the 
meaning of a frontier. In Colonial days 
the man who was disgusted or discouraged 
stepped to the edge of civilization. He fed, 
clothed and outfitted himself — not at public 
expense, but at nature's expense. 

To-day, the United States is bounded by 
the oceans and by Mexico and Canada. 
There is no frontier — no "free for all." 
xA^merica is living a new life. 

With the ending of the nineteenth century 
the free land in the United States vanished. 
Long before that time the best of the natural 
resources — timber, minerals, water-power and 
fertile agricultural land — had been labeled 
"mine" by a relatively small group of power- 
ful industrial and financial interests. The 
ownership of agricultural land was still wide- 
ly scattered. The ownership of the most 
important timber and mineral resources was 
being rapidly concentrated. 

What will be the result of this private 
ownership of natural resources? The time 
has come when that question must be faced 
and analyzed scientifically. 

While resources were free for the asking, 
no man could put a price upon them and 
demand to be paid because of his land 
ownership. The moment that free land dis- 
appears, land ownership commands a monop- 
oly price. In the centers of trade and in- 
dustry this monopoly power is enormous. 
Where it is exercised over very rich re- 
sources, like coal lands or timber lands, 
the monopoly power of private ownership 
is likewise very great. Consequently, im- 
mense prices are paid for pieces of land 
that a short time ago were practically value- 
less. Thus the hard, unyielding rock soil of 
Manhattan, all of which was sold by the In- 
dians for a few dollars, is now valued in 
places at upwards of $40,000,000 an acre. 
This immense valuation is the result of the 
presence of population, of trade and of in- 
dustry. The owner of the land need have 
done nothing in the way of improvement. 

The land upon which the city of Boston 
stands was valued at $366,000,000 in 1890, 
and at $672,000,000 in 1910. The interval 
of twenty years resulted in a doubling of 
these land values. The farm land of the 
United States was worth $13,000,000,000 in 
1900 and $28,000,000,000 in 1910. During the 
same period the value of farm land in Illi- 
nois rose from $1,500,000,000 to $3,000,000,- 
000; in Iowa from $1,250,000,000 to $2,750,- 
000,000; in Kansas from $1,000,000,000 to 
$1,500,000,000. The fact that the land is 
limited in amount, and is in great demand, 
is sufficient to place upon it a high monopoly 
price. 

The private ownership of natural resource 
was a scheme that was devised to stimulate 
thrift, energy and ambition. It was in- 
tended to give an opportunity for life, liberty 
and the pursuit of happiness. 

When the principle of individual owner- 
ship was first resorted to the United States 
was a wilderness. Resources existed for all, 
and in abundance. Since that time free land 
has disappeared. The whole economic foun- 
dation of life has been revolutionized. There 
is no more free land and the frontier has 
disappeared. 

Each change in economic conditions give 
rise to new needs and new relations. Social 
forms are modified because the basis for life 
is altered. Two generations ago the coun- 



try's adjustment to life included a safety 
valve in the form of a frontier. The fron- 
tier meant cheap grazing land, free agri- 
cultural land, free timber and free minerals. 
To-day each first-class piece of land in the 
United States has its price. 

Sooner or later the American public must 
decide whether a system of private prop- 
erty in natural resources can work advan- 
tageously after free land disappears. Up to 
the point where land ownership carried with 
it no monopoly power, many legitimate jus- 
tifications could be urged in its favor. Now 
that private property in land almost in- 
evitably carries with it the power to lay a 
monopoly tax upon the industry of the com- 
munity, the situation takes on a very differ- 
ent aspect. 



LA FOLLETTE 

(By Mark Sullivan in Collier's.) 



.Senator La Toilette is what folks often 
call "a trying person." Last March and April 
he put himself in the forefront of public 
attention by a stubborn and spectacular effort 
to prevent our entrance into the war — a per- 
formance which flooded the press with execra- 
tions of him. Thereupon he retired from 
public view, passing four months with only 
infrequent participation in the debates. Now 
he emerges, and it turns out that he has 
been busy framing a tax measure which 
takes no account of the bills prepared by the 
committees, a piece of pioneering work which 
commands the respect even of persons who, 
politically, do not like him. Senator Lodge 
of Massachusetts said of it: 

"The Senator from Wisconsin (Mr. La 
Follette) has a bill on a different system 
from ours — a coherent system, but a different 
theory. I do not agree with the theory, but 
there is no doubt that it is a coherent and 
intelligent system of raising revenue. . . ." 

It would be difficult to exaggerate the 
amount of devoted application, of midnight 
oil, involved in this self-imposed task. On 
the part of Senator La Follette, it is char- 
acteristic. His career has been divided be- 
tween performances which can only be de- 
scribed as capricious obstinancy, and the suc- 
cessful performance of unique tasks, the 
solving of new problems born of changed 
economic conditions, which could only be 
done through high intelligence, intense ap- 
plication, and real courage. Taking his more 
than thirty years of participation in public 
affairs as a whole, the balance is on the 
credit side. 

Senator La Follette's tax bill drops all that 
long and complex business of imports on 
coffee, tea, and other subjects of general 
consumption which formed the bulk of the 
bill originally written by the Ways and 
Means Committee; he ignores that com- 
mittee's arbitrary and unintelligent dip into 
an increased tariff of 10 per cent, on im- 
ports. He makes no change in existing taxes 
except to increase those on incomes and 
liquor. He faces the business of paying for 
a war as a new problem. He proposes to pay 
it, logically, chiefly out of the excess profits 
made by those who make and sell war sup- 
plies. It may well turn out that no man in 
Congress will have made so useful a con- 
tribution to the conduct of the war as the 
one who most stubbornly resisted our enter- 
ing it. Probably the ultimate form of the 
revenue bill will be some variation of Sena- 
tor La Follette's idea. In any event, the 
Ways and Means Committee is now utterly 
discredited. 



Notice to Seamen 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE MANNING PROBLEM. 
(Continued from Page 2.) 



have been an advocate of schoolships for a 
great many years. But -what we have to deal 
witli now is an immediate condition, and as 
Secretary Redlicld has so well stated, we can 
not lose a day in the movement of a ship. 
That really means a loss of so many American 
lives on the French front. We cannot aflford 
to do that. \N'e must meet the demand for offi- 
cers and men as it arises from day to day. 

I have indicated generally the magnitude of 
the proposition. It is a wonderfully large prop- 
osition the manning of these new ships; a 
larger proposition than the entire world saw 
before the outbreak of the war in any one 
year. I do not know that I can add anything 
to what I have said. 

I should be very glad if I could give you 
the exact figures, but I have tried to indicate 
the magnitude of the proposition and have en- 
deavored to address myself, not as Captain 
Wescott did, to matters before the war, but 
to matters that face us generally to-day. Mat- 
ters before the war have no pertinence. I 
would like to say, in conclusion, to my goo<l 
friend from the upper Hudson, who spoke of 
the sinking of those ships off of Nantucket, that 
my recollection is that they were foreign ships. 
That is my recollection. Were they not? 

Mr. Pluminer: Would it be proper to ask if 
there is a scarcity of officers right now? 

Mr. Cliamberlain: Yes; undoubtedly there is. 
In the month of June, when the order was 
issued, there was a requirement for about 300 
licensed officers. We wrote to the association 
of which Captain White is president, the asso- 
ciation on the Pacific Coast. I have not the 
figures in my mind at this time. I should have 
brought the letter with me. Possibly you can 
tell me the number you said you had. 

Captain White: If there is such a scarcity of 
officers, why is it that the superintendent in 
charge of the Shipping Board in our locality, 
at Seattle, Washington, when there were ap- 
plications made for positions, told the men that 
there were more masters than there were posi- 
tions? The evidence is to the effect that this 
is a true assertion. I think that that is a mat- 
ter that should be investigated, and that officer 
should be compelled to say why he told these 
men that there was nothing for them to do. 

Secretary Redfield: I do not know, of course, 
why he said that. I can only suggest that he 
may have been ill. 

I can assure you that the Shipping Board has 
been consulting with me on matters of great 
gravity because of the shortage of officers, and 
they regard the situation with a great deal of 
concern. 

I would like to ask Mr. Chamberlain whether 
it was Captain White's organization that told 
the number of men available, and that the De- 
partment, in a single month, used up all they 
had? 

Mr. Chamberlain: That is true, I think. 
(Addressing Captain White.) The Pacific 
Coast Shipmasters' Association is the associa- 
tion of which you are president? 

Captain White: The Pacific Coast Shipmas- 
ters' Association of the United States of Amer- 
ica. 

Captain Wescott: I would like to say a word 

in that connection 

Secretary Wilson: !Mr. Chamberlain has the 
floor at present. 

Mr. Chamberlain: I am perfectly willing to 
yield, providing Captain Wescott's remarks re- 
late to this particular question. 

Captain Wescott: They do. We had 50 men 
on the working list that we could get in si.x 
hours' time. The Shipping Board called upon 
us once and stated that they wanted half a 
dozen third mates and three second mates. 
They were supplied to them. We sent them 
inside of three hours. That was the Shipping 
Board in San Francisco. 

I. want to say also that on account of our 
men being unable to get employment on mer- 
chant vessels, about 75 have gone into the 
Naval Reserve. 

Mr. Chamberlain: I think that is very much 
to their credit; that is what they should do. 

Captain Wescott: That shows their patriot- 
ism. However, there is no shortage of officers 
on the Pacific Coast. There has been no 
shortage of officers on the Pacific Coast. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Secretary Wilson: Let me ask this question, 
in order that we may go straight ahead, with- 
out getting into an argument. 

Is it not a fact — and I want to get at this as 
a matter of information merely — that you will 
have to have a surplus of men in order to have 
a sufficient number of men? In other words, you 
might have 3.000 licensed men, or 5,000, as has 
been stated, but those licensed men are scat- 
tered over all the ports of the United States. 
You may have 1.000 vessels. Those 1,000 ves- 
sels are scattered in all ports of the United 
States. Now, you may have SO or 75 surplus 
licensed officers in San Francisco at the very 
same time that you have a shortage of a similar 
number in New York, notwithstanding the fact 
that all told you had 5.000 licensed men for the 
vessels? That is the situation, it seems to me, 
that :^ou have to deal with. You cannot wait for 
licensed men in New York until you get licensed 
men across from San Francisco. You have to 



meet the problem locally, notwithstanding the 
fact that it is also a general problem. I simply 
throw that out as a suggestion, so that we may 
possibly get the viewpoint of the entire field and 
get away from the argumentative side of the 
question. 

Secretary Redfield: And for the same reason 
I want to say to Captain Wescott, in particular, 
if he will pardon me, that 5,000 licensed officers 
are not going to be nearly sufficient. They will 
not be sufficient, nor will 1,000 more, nor 1,000 
more, to meet the demands of the United States 
for its ships. 

I realize how difticult it is for me to separate 
my thought from the things of the past. Noth- 
ing of which you and I have any knowledge in 
the past in marine affairs is a safe guide now in 
looking to the task to which this Nation has set 
its hand. I can give you this as a matter of 
comparison. 

Our Army was — and I wish to emphasize 
"was" — rather less than 200,000. It is about 
2,000,000 now, or m.ore. I am not speaking offi- 
cially, but as I gather it from the press. 

Now, something of a kindred character is to 
be expected from the merchant marine of this 
country very rapidly. That is a fact which we 
have to keep in mind. That is one of the things 
we arc here to consider. 

Statement of Mr. Franklin. 
Mr. Franklin: Mr. Chairman, it seems to me 
the situation is one that can be best considered 
in this way: There is no question that there 
has been and is now a shortage of officers and 
engineers. If you try to localize it, you may 
find that that is not the case in certain ports, 
but, generally speaking, there is a shortage. 

This war is proving of tremendous importance 
from a national point of view, so far as our 
shipping is concerned. A nation cannot become, 
and will not in the future be safe, unless it con- 
trols and has its own merchant shipping. Today 
merchant ships, from our national viewpoint, are 
just as valuable, if not more so, than battleships. 
No one, I am quite sure, will dispute that. I 
am sure that those gentlemen who have already 
spoken, the President of the United States and 
others interested in the welfare of the United 
States, are anxious to have the matter of Ameri- 
can shipping developed. They are anxious to 
have American ships manned by American citi- 
zens. They are not anxious to have aliens or 
others manning our shipping. 

In order to develop shipping for the future, we 
need cooperation with these men here. They are 
just as important as the ships or anything else. 
It is all part and parcel of what is important 
for the Nation. 

^[y suggestion is that we need action; we do 
not want words; we want action now. I suggest 
that a committee, a small committee, composed 
of representatives of the Commerce Department, 
of the Labor Department, and the Shipping 
Board, hear these gentlemen, get their stories, 
get their actual figures, and find out what they 
can do, and also what action they are taking to 
develop men for the future, and what cooperation 
they want from the shipping companies to de- 
velop men for the service. We will accomplish 
more in that direction, it seems to me, than by 
any other action. I simply offer that as a sug- 
gestion. (Applause.) 

Remarks by Mr. Furuseth, 
Mr. Furuseth: Mr. Chairman, I think that the 
suggestion will be a very good one a little 
later on. Just now I think it should not be con- 
sidered or acted upon or debated. I believe that 
it would be the best thing that could take place 
here at this time for all the different groups that 
are here represented to bluntly and plainly state 
the absolute, unvarnished truth, as they know it, 
to each other. When we have done that, I be- 
lieve we can get together and accomplish the 
things that are needed by the Government and 
for the development of the forces that are 
needed in this great emergency. I believe that 
this can be done, gentlemen. I believe there are 
many ship owners, the majority of them, as I 
understand it, who are willing to get in line, 
and that will make the carrying on of the sug- 
gestion possible. I believe, however, we should 
take the time necessary for the engineers to 
make their statements as to their position and 
as to what they can do. Then there should be a 
statement from the seamen as to what their 
actual condition is and what they believe they 
can do. When that is done, I think the sug- 
gestion made by Mr. Franklin will be a timely 
suggestion, and can then be considered. To 
take a small committee now and say to these 
men who have come here from distant points, 
"You give me your figures; where is Tom Jones; 
where can we get him," will get you nowhere. 
No one can give that information. 

Y'ou can get general information as to the 
number of the men that can be obtained and 
that are willing and ready to go when they are 
called upon. I believe that as firmly as I be- 
lieve that I am alive. I believe it as a result 
of my investigation and study of this subject. 
I believe, however, before you appoint any com- 
mittees, we should have the different groups here 
speak their minds bluntly and plainly. That is 
the only way yxju can get at it. As Secretary 
Redfield has so wisely said, this is a human 
problem. It is from a human point of view 
that you are going to reach it. You can reach 
it if you go at it in that way. (Applause.) 



Mr. McQuade: Mr. Secretary, I agree with 
Mr. Franklin as to the appointment of a com- 
mittee. I believe that the further you go on 
with the discussion the further apart you will 
find yourselves. It is a national question, and 
the question of the human should be subjected 
to that of the welfare of the nation. You talk 
in circles about it. We have been sitting here 
sweltering for two hours, listening to the reading 
of reports, letters, and to the discussion of per- 
sonal experiences that are absolutely of no in- 
terest to 95 per cent, of us. 

As far as the seamen are concerned, the Sec- 
retary has stated that it is the intention of not 
only the Government but of the steamship com- 
panies to give Americans preference; that is, 
first, last and all the time. After that, if there 
is any deficiency, it is to be made up as best we 
can. 

As far as doing the work and getting these 
men to fill the positions is concerned, that can 
be done. It is up to the Secretaries to outline 
the way to get them. In my opinion, that 
should be done by cooperation and not by dis- 
cussion. Your government has had more or less 
experience in this emergency as to committee 
work. Your labor men know, and your steam- 
ship men know how these committees through- 
cut the country have been doing their work. 
There are committees representing every trade. 
Many of them have given their service to the 
Government without any thought whatever of 
compensation, but just for the betterment of all 
concerned. The sooner you get down to some- 
thing concrete and appoint a committee, the 
quicker will you get the results. 

I would elaborate somewhat on the idea of 
Mr. Franklin and follow it up with the sugges- 
tion that you have a committee to handle the 
Pacific Coast matters, and another for the At- 
lantic Seaboard, and then treat in the same way 
the Gulf and the Great Lakes. Let them get 
together and discuss these matters in a common 
sense fashion, man to man. 

I would like to digress for just a minute and 
refer to the matter of longshoremen. I am 
an employer of stevedores. The situation with 
reference to the longshoremen in the United 
States is a serious one. Back of all this stalling 
is the question of the dollar. The men want 
money. I am in a position where I am in close 
touch with the labor, and I am at the beck and 
at the call and command of the steamship com- 
panies. I flatter myself that an experience of 25 
years in New York has put me in close touch 
with longshoremen. I know that the steamship 
men know that they have their agreement and 
that these men will live up to the agreement. 
However, these agreements are going to expire 
in two months' time and we will then have an- 
other situation before us. The president of the 
International Longshoremen's Association will 
undoubtedly tell you that the longshoremen will 
be looking for more money. I suggest that the 
time to discuss that is the time to discuss the 
seamen's grievances. Mr. Franklin has suggested 
the appointment of a committee. I have elab- 
orated upon that somewhat by suggesting the 
appointment of other committees. There could 
be a subcommittee. I think, that could be made 
answerable to the Secretaries, and then we would 
be working along intelligent lines. Discussion 
will not get you anywhere. The steamship com- 
panies have grievances, also, but they are not 
airing them at this time. 

Secretary Wilson: May I take the liberty of 
suggesting at this time that free discussion such 
as we have had this morning is by no means 
lost time. It would be impossible to secure the 
cooperation of large numbers of people without 
first getting an expression from -them of the 
basis upon which they are willing to cooperate. 
Some statements have been made here this 
morning that were surprising to Secretary Red- 
field. He did not know that such a viewpoint 
was in existence in recent months, at least. I 
take it that there are a number of viewpoints 
relative to the subject matter that are held by 
the ship owners that are absolutely unknown to 
the seamen, and that there are a number of 
viewpoints that are held by the seamen that are 
absolutely unknown to the ship owners. It will 
be a practical impossibility for you to appoint a 
committee that will be able to draft plans of 
cooperation until the seamen know what the 
viewpoint of the ship owner is and the ship 
owners know what the viewpoint of the seamen 
is. So, while all the discussion that has taken 
place may at times weary you, as I perhaps 
weary you now, it is conveying the viewpoint of 
one group to another, so that you may ulti- 
mately be in a position to select a committee 
that will draft something that is practical. (Ap- 
plause.) 

Mr. Furuseth: I suggest that the marine en- 
gineers be permitted to make their statement. 

Mr. Raymond: May I suggest that the Sec- 
retary pass out cards in order that we may find 
out who is here, so that we may have knowledge 
of it later on? 

Secretary Wilson: I had expected, at the time 
we take recess, or when we return from the re- 
cess, to have the different delegates register with 
the Secretary here, and that will give us a 
record as to who is here. 

Mr. Plummcr: In order that we may have 
definite information while we can get it. would 
it not be well for Mr. Chamberlain, while he is 
here, to complete the statement he was making 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



k 



when interrupted, and clear up the point as to 
whether there is a scarcity of officers or is not? 
My understanding is that there is a great scarcity 
of officers, but I may be misinformed on that 
point. 

Statement of Mr. Brown. 

Mr. Brown: I believe after the statement is 
made by the Marine Engineers there will be 
some more matters for Commissioner Chamber- 
lain to clear up. 

Some months ago, Mr. Secretary, information 
was received by the Marine Engineers' Organi- 
zation that there was a scarcity of engineers 
throughout the country. We did not pay a great 
deal of attention to this rumor, because we were 
satisfied that the rumor was incorrect, but re- 
peated statements coming to us from govern- 
ment officials made us look into the matter 
carefully, and a little more than a week ago our 
executive committee was instructed to make a 
thorough investigation of the statement that 
there was a scarcity of men. Now, this infor- 
mation is taken right from the Government's 
records. It is in Secretary Redfield's files. We 
have approximately 30,000 marine engineers re- 
corded in that office, in the Bureau of Steamboat 
Inspection Service. For that 30,000 marine en- 
gineers there are less than 15,000 berths, leaving 
a surplus of more than 15,000 engineers to fill 
15,000 positions. Those matters will be spoken 
of in greater detail by Mr. Follette, of Seattle, 
who compiled the figures. But what I have in 
mind is that I am really glad, Mr. Secretary, 
that you did not entertain the suggestion of 
resolving this meeting into several committees. 
In your letter under date of June 29, in the first 
paragraph of that letter, there is a matter of 
vital importance, not only to the Marine En- 
gineers, but to every man who works aboard a 
ship, whether he be master or coal passer. You 
said (Reading): 

"The existence of a state of war has created 
abnormal conditions at sea, grievously affecting 
the supply of seamen and the proper manning 
of vessels. The contemplated building of large 
numbers of additional vessels and the manning 
of the same when afloat will make the problem 
more acute. A sufficient supply of seamen for 
the merchant vessels of our allies, as well as for 
American merchant vessels, is essential to the 
proper conduct of the war. The establishment of 
harmonious relations between seamen and ship 
owners and the removal of all obstacles, real or 
imaginary, and adding to the number as neces- 
sity may require, would be of immense value to 
the country in the present emergency." 

Gentlemen, I think that is one of the greatest 
things in the secretary's letter to get that ironed 
out right in this conference. 

I have served, gentlemen, from my boyhood, 
on steamers on the Great Lakes. Occasionally 
I have gone down, in the winter time, when ves- 
sels were laid up on the lakes, and sailed on the 
ocean; but I believe I know the conditions on 
the Great Lakes more thoroughly than I do 
those of any other part of the waters of the 
United States. There is a condition existing on 
the Great Lakes today which, it seems to me 
until the Government docs something to wipe it 
out, the eflfective effort of this meeting will be 
practically useless, and that is the regulation that 
the Lake carriers have established which bars 
men who are representatives of the various or- 
ganizations from going anywhere near their 
ships to speak to the men. Those representa- 
tives are practically locked out as though they 
were vagabonds. Those are some of the things 
I would like to hear discussed here today in this 
conference before it is resolved into commit- 
tees, if that is to be done as suggested by Mr. 
Franklin. (Applause.) 

Mr. Oakley Wood, of New Y^rk: I came here 
upon invitation, and after listening to the last 
speaker about allowing the representatives of 
these organizations to go near the plant and 
around the steamers, I want to say that at the 
present moment in New York our company has 
a steamship ready to sail for Italy with frozen 
beef which is held up because some delegate, 
by name St. James, has ordered those men not 
to sign on until they get one hundred per cent, 
bonus instead of fifty. These men are all willing 
to go, but they are afraid of being disbarred 
from the Union. 

That is just one little incident I wanted to 
mention, in reply to the remarks you have just 
listened to. That ship mentioned as being ready 
to sail, is very important to get away just now. 

Mr. Thomas L. Delahunty, Secretary, Marine 
Engineers' Association of the Port of New York: 
In reply to the gentlemen, as Secretary of the 
Barber Steamship Company, I might say the 
statement is true in the part only. The story 
goes back considerably farther than that. The 
Barber Steamship Company discharged a Chief 
Engineer and the whole crew on another ship of 
that line about six weeks or two months ago 
because they had the temerity to ask for one 
hundred per cent. This man was employed by 
the Barber line for fifteen years. There is a 
mutual understanding with the members of our 
organization, where the demand is made or the 
request is made for one hundred per cent, that 
they will not go there. This is the condition, 
gentlemen, that has been brought about by the 
steamship companies themselves. They have en- 
couraged sedition among our members. We are 
ready to believe that they have encouraged an 
outlaw organization in the Port of New York. 



I was called up last evening, and Mr. St. James 
said the men on the dock want to sign up for 
fifty-five per cent. I replied, "If they want to 
sign up for fifty-five per cent., you nor the 
Association can stop them." We revised the 
rules governing the Marine Engineers' Associa- 
tion to comply with the conditions, and an 
agreement was entered into with the steamship 
companies and we refused to abrogate that 
agreement. If we had any encouragement at all 
that they would accept the rules which govern 
our membership, if we had a little cooperation 
with the steamship companies, if it were claimed 
that these rules are objectionable, we could get 
together and remove the objections or we could 
reconcile the differences, but that opportunity was 
never given us. Consequently, no one is more 
responsible for the conditions that prevail in the 
Port of New York than the steamship com- 
panies themselves. 

(To be continued.) 



PITCAIRN ISLAND PEOPLE HAPPY. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



neglected for the field work, in which the 
women take a harder part than the men. Every- 
body retires early, due, supposedly, to the fact 
that they are usually without lighting, although 
since the steamboats have been running there 
is an ample supply of oil and candles. 

"During the arrowroot seasons, when they 
have to peel at night, as they usually grind dur- 
ing the day, they burn what is known as the 
candle nut. The kernel of the nut is threaded 
on a piece of the leaf of the coconut tree; but 
it is a flickering light and smokes badly. 

"But two meals a day are eaten. The women 
are clever cooks and can make many dishes out 
of the small variety of food from which they 
have to choose. 

"There is a strange feature about imported 
vegetables, such as cabbage, cauliflower, beet 
roots, parsnips and onions. They grow well, tiut 
will not bear seed. Because of this, there is a 
small variety of vegetables. Pumpkins, marrow, 
tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots, beans and lettuce 
do well all the year around. The soil is very 
rich, but is porous, and needs an abundant sup- 
ply of rain. 

"The only creatures on the island belonging 
to the animal kingdom are a few dogs and 
cats, a number of fowl, one old horse, one poor 
sheep and a number of goats. The little kids 
are often made great pets. There are plenty of 
ants, lizards, cockroaches and moths. 

"Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays are the 
days in which the communal labor is done. 
Work begins at 6 in the morning, with a stop 
at 10 for breakfast, and if the weather is not 
suitable for planting, they work from 11 to 3. 
They then repair the roads and the boats, mark 
the goats which run loose on the hills, and of 
which each family has a share, and make 
wooden pipes through which the water is carried 
from the spring to a large wooden tank just 
outside of town, and then in barrels on wheel- 
barrows to their homes. 

"Recently a schooner was constructed on the 
island under great difficulties. You ask what the 
women did to help. First, they encouraged their 
husbands and fed them well; they made baskets 
and painted panels, which were really well done, 
considering that the women are self taught. 
The baskets and paintings were taken to the 
passing vessels and exchanged for old iron 
from which to make nails and for rope, pamt, 
tools and lumber. All the timber had to be 
cut and sawed by hand, and many of the nails 
and bolts were handmade. For a long time 
the only fuel to be had for the work was the 
coke from the bake ovens of the missionaries. 
The heat was insufficient and the work went 
slowly until a generous captain gave them the 
needed coal. There were so few tools with 
which to work that one man would have to 
wait for another to finish his job before he 
could begin. It required thirteen months to 
finish the schooner. . 

"The event which gives most pleasure and is 
most appreciated by all on the island is a call 
from a vessel. It is good to hear Sail O 
echoing tlVrough the hills and valleys. All work 
stops suddenly, and the children scamper to 
gather fruits and vegetables from fields and 
plantations. There is a scramble for the boats; 
everybody is happy; the vessel is watched con- 
stantly and is the subject of conversation for 
days to come. Only those who are so isolated, 
can appreciate the joy that such an event 
brings."— Christian Science Monitor. 

THE SUPER-FIGHT. 



To fight against the grim, massed wrongs 
of years ; 
To fight against the infamies of Greed ; 
To fight that Hope may take the place of 

fears ; 
To fight that women's smiles may banish 
tears — 
That is the fight we wage— a Fight in- 
deed! 

— The Australian Worker. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Peigo 5.) 



LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

Headquarters: 

406 N. Clark Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 3637. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 19 Main Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 1-2 Ferry Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 47 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO. Ohio 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CT-EVELAND. O 



Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T, 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Stations: 
Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

EUREKA, Cal 227 First Street, P. O. Box 64 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash... 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal... 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 674 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 64 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street. P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C.) Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C.) Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 

BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 10 East Street 

SACRAMENTO. Cal Labor Temple 



u 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Mayor Curley has signed the "one 
day off in three" ordinance for Bos- 
ton municipal firemen, the act to 
become effective February 18, next ' 
year. 

Track walkers and road laborers 
on the Columbia and Port Deposit 
branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
suspended work to enforce a five 
cents an hour increase. 

The Department of Agriculture 
predicts that the price of potatoes 
will drop because of this year's in- 
creased yield, which is estimated at 
more than 467,000,000 bushels, as 
compared with 285,000,000 bushels in 
1916 and 360,000,000 bushels in 1915. 
Organized textile workers of Phila- 
delphia have won a court victory 
over the firm of C. H. Masland & 
Son, which has been denied an in- 
junction against picketing. This firm 
is the only weaving plant in Phila- 
delphia that has refused to accept 
a new wage contract which raised 
rates 12J/2 per cent. 

In a speech in Olympia, Wash., 
H. L. Hughes, a State official, de- 
clared that industrial peace can only 
be secured by employers conceding 
the right to workers to organize 
and then to settle differences by con- 
ference. He predicted that the lum- 
ber barons in this section would 
have to recognize these principles. 

Attorney General Hubbard has 
ruled that women will be allowed to 
work only eight hours in manu- 
facturing, mercantile and mechanical 
plants in Colorado. This decision 
was rendered at the request of Labor 
Commissioner Morrissey, who was 
asked by the Great Western Sugar 
Company to permit it to employ 
women in eleven-hour shifts. 

The Federal Child Labor law has 
been declared unconstitutional by 
United States District Judge James 
E. Boyd of North Carolina. The de- 
cision was based on the ground that 
though the law is ostensibly a regu- 
lation of interstate commerce, its 
real intent is regulation of conditions 
within a State and therefore beyond 
its powers. The Government will 
appeal. 

The loudly proclaimed Rockefeller 
"union" is slowly falling to pieces, 
despite frantic efforts of press agents 
to bolster it up. As an indication 
of the thin ice under the "union," 
employes of the Colorado Fuel & 
Iron Company are signing petitions 
to John D. Rockefeller, Jr., to 
reject the Rockefeller industrial plan 
and recognize the United Mine 
Workers. 

Carpenters' Union of Wilmington, 
N. C, has submitted a new wage 
scale to employers. Rates are 50 
cents an hour, nine hours to con- 
stitute a day's work, time and one- 
half for overtime, double time for 
legal holidays and Sundays and no 
work on Labor Day, except in an 
emergency. On the first Monday in 
November the eight-hour day will 
become effective. 

At a meeting of Newark (N. J.) 
Jewelers' Union, attended by over 
1000 members, numerous shop stew- 
ards reported wage increases of 
from 10 to 20 per cent. About 80 
per cent. of the manufacturing 
jewelers conduct union shops and 
are not in sympathy, it is stated, 
with the anti-union attitude of Car- 
ter, Gough & Co., whose eighty- 
eight employes have suspended 
work. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Offlc* Phon* Elliott 11M 



Eat&bllshed 1890 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Dat« Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Aatronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

600-1 SECURITIES BLDQ. Next to U. S. Steamship Inspectors' Offles 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEIA.TTLB, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New ITumlture 

2E cents and up par Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORB, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wath., Letter LUt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce. letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 



Alton, N. 
Anderson, H. -822 
Andersen, Julius 
Andersen, K. P. 
Andersen, Frank H. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, Gust 
Anise, Johan 
Andersen, John 
Anderson, Martin 
Abrahamsen, W. 
Berg. John 
Bertelsen, B. 
Bensen, Helge 
Broundl, F. 
Buhman, H. 
Busch, H. 
Bywater, C. 
Bjurnson, J. 
(package) 
Blomberg, Gust 
Benedict, Joe 
Berglln, G. H. 
Borvik, C. EUasen 
Cadogan, J. 
Carruthers, M. 
Chamberlain, L. C. 
Checkan, B. 
Connerv. Matt 
Corty, C. 
Carlson, Gus 
Caravan. W. W. 
Chrlstoffersen, B. 
Danielsen, O. J. 
Dehler, F. M. 
Droje, H. 
Darrow, H. 
Drotningbaug, O. 
F.llasen, H. O. -837 
Eliasen, John E. 
Ekholm, Gus 
Ettrup, Jens 
Eriksen, Alfred 
Eriksen, E. 
Erikson, John 
Engebretsen, J. 
Fogel, O. 
Franzell, A. 
Forrest, Wide 
Fallbom, J. A. 
Gabrielsen, Gust 
Glace. G. 
Gronbeck. Theo. 
Groth, Karl 
Gaiipeseth, S. 
Gill, Harry 
Gilbert, A. J. 
Grau, Axpsel 
Hanson, Andrew 
Hansen, Marius 
Hansen, Ole 
Hunter, G. H. 
Hannelius, Ragnar 
Hosset, C. 
Hammond, Chas. 
Hansen, L. -1314 
Hendrlksen, John 
Holmes, C. A. 
Isaksen, A. W. 
Isaksen, O. 
Jensen, H. P. A. 
Jypesen, Peter 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, Alex 
Johnson, J. -343 
Johnson, Andrew 
Jorgensen, Fredrik 
Jullson, C. A. 
Jensen. Hans 
Jargenbeck, J. 
Johanson, J. R. 
Johansen, Karl 
Johnson, Chas. 
Karlson, Gustaf A. 
Karlson, Johan E. 



Lackey, C. 
Larsen, Nils 
Larsen, Emll 
Larson, Lars 
Larson, E. 
Lausson, Jack 
Laursen. Nils 
LIndstrom, T. 
Lundberg, A. C. 
I^anresen, Hans 
Llndwall. Richard 
Larsen, M. E. L. 
Llndecker. C. 
Larsen, Ejernd 

(package) 
Larsen, C. -1516 
Magi, John 
Marko, H. 
Mathisen, Jorgen 
McNicol, G. C. 
Madsen, Johannus 
McNeill. Ross 
Mathesen, Nils 
MacLeod, Johrt 
McManlgal, Thos. 
Mlkkelsen, K. -1620 
Mostad. Leonard 
Mlkkelsen. P. 
Madsen, C. H. 
Mathiesen. Jorger 
Mat.son, Eric 
McLaughlin, Dan 
Nelsen, N. P. 
Nielsen, Even F. 
Ness, L. 
Nllsen, N. 
Nord, F. 
Norton, Emil 
Nvhagen, Julius 
Nelson, M- -1330 
Nelson, John 
Nielson. Christen 
Newman, .John 
Newland, E. 
Naro, M. 
Nllsen, J. G, 
Nelsen, L. 
Ohman, H. 
Olsen, C. Otto 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, Johan S. 
Olsen, Olsen 
Olsen, (iarl 
Olsen, Johan 
Olsen, Hjalmar Fr. 
Olsen, Henry 
Olsen. J. H. 
Oyvall, Johan 
Olsen, B. -597 
Olsen, A. M. 
Olsson, Frank 
Olsson, C. M. -6824 
Olsen, Ole -1020 
Owens, J. H. 
Petterson, Chr. 
Petterson, O. N. 
Federsen, Carl 
Pederson, H. -1560 
Perkins, Floyd 
Powers, James 
Petersen, Hans L. 
Paterson, P, 
Plant, W. 
Rehnstrom, A. G. 
Renberg, Ed. 
Roos, A. W. 
Roos, B. 
Rosenqulst, G. 
Rasmussen, L. 
Riscossa, John 
Ron, Gus 
Ruckmlck, Anton 
Rosnes, C. B. 
Russel, Arthur 
Runstrum, Albert 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIO STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor, Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pin* 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H, S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New Tork Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Taeoma Letter Liat. 



Andersson, Alberto 
Carlstrand, G. 
Darbarog, Martin 
Hodson, H, I. 
Holmstrom, Carl A. 
.lacobson, Gustaf 
Kalberg, William 
Keinanen, Emll 
Magnusson, Ernest 

W. 
Martinsson, B. 
Marx, Thorvald 



Nelson, C. W. 
Nielsen, Niels -751 
Palken, G. 
Pearson, Fred 
Petterson, Hjalmar 
Pettersen, Charles 

-472 
Simonsen, Sam 
Stewart, Wm. H. 
Suemlnen, Oscar 
Swansen, Carl 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHINC3 AND FURNISHINGS 

Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 839S 



Renstrom, P. 
Salonen, John 
Sandberg, John 
SIgvartsen, A. 
Simonsen, A. S. 
Smith, Emil 
Stalzerman, Emil 
Svard, C. P. 
Svansen. Ben 
Saunders, Oscar 
Schmidt, Emil -152 
Seibert, Henry 
Sigvartsen, Arthur 
Sorensen, Carl 
Stein, J. 
Strasdln, A. W. 
Swansen, Axel 
Saxley, C. H. 
Sivertsen, Karl 



Smith, G. -893 
Svard, C. P. 
Them, Arvid 
Thai, Richard 
Tlngburg, Axel 
Tergersen, A. N. 
Tiechert, G. 
Teikert, K. H. 
Valentinsen, G. 
Venema, H. 
Williams, T. C. 
Walker, H. W. 
Walker, J. H. 
Woodley, Clifford 
Wellbrook, Henry 
Wlnstrom, Oscar 
Woodbury, G. W. 
Wold, J. J. 
Zilenk, A. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Q M O K' F R ^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
O IVl W IV IL. IV O y^^^ j^ ^jjj^j^ y^y gj.^ served. 

Issued by Aultionly ol the Cigar Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(this Ctnlifli'? 1lultlitCifljtsci»iii.ned.nihiibo>ru»«b«eiiiiail«t7aFllSlCljSSWon(inail 
aMdiaCROf THtCICARUUfia'INUaiKTIO'ULUNIONal Agit'Ka. inorginiuIOlOevoledttlhtad 
>dnaiiinil of Ike MOM MATUIAliml inltuXCIIUL IvtMAKl OF TH( CDATT. TI«il4iil<<nit«aittM 
U»M CrQirs to jll sfflol^r^ Ihrouahout int world 
' All lAliitifcnwnii upon this i*bu mil be puni&tied accoftfinq tolM. 



' c 'f r r ,.r \„^^,a 



- — > . K/- —\, 



Eureka, CaL 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick servlcs 

233 Second Street, Eureka, CaL 

Teddy ® Ha^an 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," ths "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - Eureka, Cat. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY A YOUNQ 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAU 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

A square"meal 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTER 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING SHOES, HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open E^venlngs. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATg. 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - • Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Photo by Terkelson & Henry 



I 



SEAMEN! 

Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

Invites All Seamen to His Up-to-Date Store in 
the New Southern Pacific Building 

20 and 22 STEUART ST., S. F. 

MERCHANDISE COVERING THE WANTS 

OF ALL SEAMEN 

Uniforms, Hats, Caps and Shoes 

WATERPROOF OIL SKINS 
and RUBBER BOOTS 

Come In and Inspect My Entire New Stock of 
UNION MADE GOODS 



Home News 



The National Civil and Political 
Party of America was organized at 
Atlantic City on August 30, at a 
meeting of 400 prominent Negroes 
from all sections of the United 
States. 

Independent Oklahoma oil pro- 
ducers complained to the Interstate 
Commerce Commission on August 
29 that oil monopoly is being per- 
petuated by excessive and unrea- 
sonable railroad rates. 

Fourteen white and nineteen col- 
ored citizens of Cincinnati make up 
the Negro Civic Welfare Committee, 
appointed by the Cincinnati Council 
of Social Agencies. Immediate at- 
tention will be given to housing, 
migration, and working girls. 

Five Socialists charged with con- 
spiring against the conscription law 
were acquitted by a jury at Detroit 
on August 18. They had circulated 
copies of the Michigan "Socialist" 
containing the anti-conscription res- 
olutions of the Socialist party. 

Among the banners carried in the 
Americanization demonstration under 
the auspices of the St. Louis Cham- 
ber of Commerce were the follow- 
ing: Birth an Accident, Citizenship 
a Choice; Italians by Birth, Ameri- 
cans by Choice; We Came from 
Syria, but Now We Are Americans. 

Southern Pacific officials estimate 
that the movement of California 
grapes, now begun, will approximate 
11,000 cars, which represents an in- 
crease of a little more than 10 per 
cent, over last year's total. Malagas 
and Tokays are moving rapidly, 
constituting some 60 per cent, of the 
shipments thus far made. 

The commission headed by Pro- 
fessor Harry A. Garfield fixed, on 
August 30, the price of $2.20 a bushel 
for the 1917 wheat crop. The price 
is based on Chicago delivery and 
applies to grade No. 1, or north- 
ern spring wheat. In New York 
City the price is to be $2.30. For 
the second grade the price is five 
cents less. 

During the last fiscal year $179.- 
372,888 were paid in income taxes by 
individuals. Corporations paid $180,- 
108,340. The total was $359,481,228. 
Excise tax receipts show a great 
increase in manufacture of distilled 
spirits and tobacco. Spirits paid a 
tax of $186,563,065, beer $91,897,193, 
tobacco in all forms. $103,201,592. 
Other excise taxes yielded $68,050,- 
832. 

Almost a half-million women of 
New York City and more than 900,- 
000 in the State have signed state- 
ments asking for the vote. At the 
convention last week of the State 
Woman Suffrage Party addresses 
and cordial letters were received 
from men prominent in both polit- 
ical parties, including President Wil- 
son, Governor Whitman and Mayor 
Mitchcl. New York votes on the 
suffrage amendment in November, 
and Maine in September. 

British Columbia, which, on the 
1st of October, falls into line as 
"dry" territory, leaves California as 
the only refuge of the saloon on 
the Pacific Coast, north of the 
Mexican boundary. Alaska, Oregon 
and Washington, with British Co- 
lumbia added, form the strong line 
of defense. But California, although 
still without State-wide prohibition, 
seems to be rapidly becoming dry 
territory. It is said that few of the 
States which have not enacted pro- 
hibitory laws have as many saloon- 
less cities as California. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The Globe Line has recently 
bought the "John H. Kirby," 2,000 
tons, now loading for South Africa, 
and the schooners "Henry F. Kre- 
ger" and "Clara A. Donnell," each 
of 1,850 tons. The latter is loading 
tobacco at Baltimore for France. 

The Shipping Board has released 
for operation by W. R. Grace & 
Co. five vessels being built by that 
company which have been comman- 
deered by the United States. Each 
of the vessels is of 5,500 tons and 
the first of them will be ready about 
October 1. 

Nearly all the steamers arriving 
at Portland, Me., of late have 
shipped locally large numbers of 
sailors and firemen, it having been 
necessary in only one or two cases 
to send to Boston for men. The 
steamers are all paying the men 
union wages, $60 for sailors, one or 
two of the boats adding $5 to that. 
The first launching from the new 
yard of the Pennsylvania Shipbuild- 
ing Co. at Gloucester, N. J., took 
place August 23. The vessel launch- 
ed was the oil tanker "Desdemona," 
originally laid down for Norwegians, 
but which has since been acquired 
by the British Government and will, 
if released by the Shipping Board, 
be managed by Messrs. Bowring. 
The new vessel is 365x50.9 ft., with 
a capacity of 8,000 tons. She will 
be driven by Parsons geared tur 
bines. The launching was made 
sideways. 

Very little lumber is being shipped 
from Maine by vessel, as tonnage of 
all sizes is very scarce. The old 
coasting fleet has been pretty well 
thinned out by the losses of the last 
few years, and it will be months 
before many of the fleet now build- 
ing can be ready for service. The 
new fleet, furthermore, is composed 
chiefly of vessels rather too large 
for coasting between Maine and 
Boston and New York, and it looks 
more than ever as if in a short time 
the railroads will have the traffic 
all to themselves. 

The 3-mast. schr. "General Maude" 
has been launched from the ship- 
yard of Joseph McGill at Shelburne, 
N. S. She is of the following di- 
mensions: Keel, 98 ft. 6 in.; over- 
all, 120 ft.; beam, 25 ft. 9 in.; depth, 
10 ft.; 180 tons gross. The "Gen- 
eral Maude" is owned by Newfound- 
land parties and will be used in the 
Newfoundland and Mediterranean 
trade. The McGill Estate are start- 
ing the construction of a larger 
vessel of the same type for New- 
foundland parties to be used in the 
South American trade. This is the 
third vessel to be launched from 
this yard since December last when 
the new management took charge. 

The U. S. Shipping Board has 
requisitioned the steamers "Melrose," 
"Newton," "Walter D. Noyes," and 
"Edward Pierce," the first two be- 
ing of 8,500 tons carrying capacity, 
the others of 6,500. The Navy De- 
partment also requisitioned two 
ocean going tugs of the Staples fleet 
and three belonging to the Phil- 
adelphia and Reading Railroad. The 
steamers have been engaged in car- 
rying coal from Hampton Roads 
ports to different points in New 
England, and so much opposition 
was expressed at taking the steam- 
ers ofT their route that two of them 
have since been released, and the 
Navy Department will abandon its 
plan of taking immediately the five 
ocean tugs. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Cor. Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1917 
Assets ....... 

Deposits ....... 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - . - 

Employees' Pension Fund - - - - . 

Number of Depositors . . . - - 



$64,566,290.79 

61,381,120.63 

2,185.170.16 

259,642.88 

65,717 



S.anne. Rudolph 
.Saunders. Chas. 
Savage, Roland 
Srfinlon, John 
Schamm. Charles 
Schlachte, Alfred 
Sohlager, Chr. 
Schikore, Otto 



Spets. Karl 
Sprogae, Theo. 
Sprogol, T. 
St. Clair. Chris. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stennesen, Harald 
Stenroos. Frans 
Stevenson, A. 



Schmidt, E. -1570 Stoltzerman. E. 

Schultz, Albert Staufft, Roy 

Seliultz, Axel Strandberg, Olaf 

Schwendt, Walde- Strand, Emil 

mar Stratten, H. B. 

Sigwartsen, Arthur Svensen, Anker F. 

Simonsen, Sigvard Svensson, W. -2591 



San FrancUco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sallon' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
tliese columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
Dort of their destination. 

Abaling, Matias Anderson, Andrew 
Abrahamson. Alfred Anderson. Chas. 
Abrahamson. WernerAnderson, Fred 
AhUiuist, Evert J. Andersen, M. -1661 
Adanison, Johan Anderson, Nils 

-1144 Anderson, P. 

Albert. J. C. Anderson, Victor E. 

Alberlsen, Peter S. Anderson, Wllford 
Albrecht, Chas. Andersson, A. -1060 

Allen. W. A. Andreasen, Hans 

Andersen, Carl -1477 

Andersen, H. -1526 Anshniit. Martin 
Andersen, K. P. Antonson, Carl 
Andersen, Martin Antonsson, G. -2077 
Andersen, O. -1118 Aspe. T. 
Anderson. A. Auzin. A. -363 

Anderson. A. -2031 Ayiward. Jauiea 

Baach, A. Beselin, Ed. 

Baak, M. Bindberg, O. F. 

Baardsen, T. Bledersiedt, Frita 

Baker, C. Bindling, O. -2291 

Barry. William J. Blackshow, Ernest 

Beckford, David Blom, Nils 



Benson, Helge A. 
Berggren, Oscar 
Bergman, Werner 
Bergstrom, Paavo 
Berk, E. W. 
Bertelson, Oskar 

-2184 
Berthelsen, Charles Buhler, Karl 
Beschovner, Robert Byers, A. 



Blumberg, Gustave 
Borg, A. 
Boswell, J. W. 
Bower, Gosta 
Bratt, Walfred 
Breien. Hans 
Brown, George 



Campbell, Martin 
Carlsen, Pete 
Carlson, Gust 
Carmell, G. 
Carr, W. D. 
Carsten, A. 
Car.stens, Otto 



Christensen, O. G. 
Christensen. Oscar 
Christiansen, Louis 
Christiansen. Sam 
Chris tofEersen, G. 
Clipper. Mike 
Corcoran, C. L. 



Cashin, John Ben Comstedt. Oscar 



Cassimos, C. 
Cederlof, Knut 
Cliarlot, George 
Christensen, Alfred 

Dahlgren, W. A. 

Dahlgren, William 

Daiuiman, John 

Danielsen, Louis M. Dracar, E. 



Conolly, Frank 
Cooistra. Sam 
Czeczerski, Paul 

Dexter. Arthur 
Didrickson, Martin 
Dixon, John 



Danielson, Eric 
Danielson, J. 
Davey, Chas. 
Decoe. Eugene 
Degroot. George 
Dehler, A. M. 
De Rose, E. W. 
Ueswert. Robert 
Dettloff, W. C. 

Eaton. Isaac N. 
Eck. Chas. 
Ekholm. Frank 
Eklund. Qua. 
Ekstrom, Viktor 
Ellerman, T. 

Fahnke. Paul 
Farcum, Andrew 
Farrell, Bernard 
Farrell, Harry 
Felsch, Harry 
Felsch. W. 
Firguson, E. A. 
Fergerson, Thomas 

Garden, Charlie 
Gardner, Hans 
Gasch, Wm. 
Gasman. George 
Gassner, Joe 
Globe, John 
Gent, Adam C. 
Gerard, Albert 



Dracar. Ivan Z. 
Drager, Otto 
Drinkliahn, Martin 
Dukatz, H. 
Dumas, C. 
Dunkel, Charley 
Dunn, Walter 
Dutra, Anthony 
Dybdal. Olaf 

Ellingsen, Erling 
Elward. Jim 
Erickson. Alf. 
Evensen. Andrew 
Evenson, E. V. 



Forsberg, Sven 
Fredholm, Chas. J. 
Fredriksen. Birgler 
Fredriksen, F. M. 
Fredrickson. Martin 
Frelherg, Peter 
Frlck. H. C. 



Gray. Hamilton 
Green. J. 
Grelr, A. 
Gregg. R. O. 
Gregoliet, Ed. 
Gregory. Antonio 
Grundman. J. 
Gunderson. George 



Gerber, Leland K. Gundersen. Kristian 



Gerner, Hans 
Gonarshang. G. 
Gottwold, Gus 
Grabower, Martin 
Grantz, John 



Gunderson, J. 
Gunderson, John 
Gunther, Ted 
Gustafson. Chas. 
Gustafsson. Valter 



Hackensmith, R. 0. Hegg. Birger 
Hagberg. Gust. Heinonen, Kusta 

Hagstedt, Charles Helgesen, George 
Hahne. Wllhelm B. Hellman, H. W. 
Halbeck. Oscar Hendersen, H. 

Hale, Klngley Hendriksen, John 

Halvarsen, O. -1167Henke, Ernest 
Handlon. Paul E. Henkelman. H. J 



Hannus, Alex 
Hannus, Mike 
Hansen, A. -2542 
Hansen, Axel H. 
Hansen, J. -2354 
Hansen. J. -2166 
Hansen, John 
Hansen. M. -968 
Hansen. Pagaard 
Hansen. W. C. H. 
Hanson. Rudolph 
Haraldsen. Alf 
Harburg, Walter 
Hartogr, J. 
Hartwlg, W. 

Isaacson. J. 
Isberg. Wicktar 

Jacklin, Chas. 
Jacobs, August 
Jacobsen, Chas. 
Jacobsen, H. P. 



Henriksen, Harald 
Hentschcl, Otto J. 
Herman. David 
Hermansson, C. P. 
Hering, Alfred 
Hoft, Axel 
Holm. O. 
Holmstrom. HJal- 

mar 
Horton, Bert 
Hubert, Harry 
Hughes. W. L. 
Hull. H. 
Hunter, G. H. 
Hunter, J. L. 

Ivertsen, Slgvald B. 

Jacobson, Edward 
Jacobson, Joaklm 
Jahnke, Paul 
Jakobsen, M. 



Janson, Brandrop 
Jarzonibeck, J. 
Jensen, Ems 
Jensen, O. K. 
Jespcrsen, Martin 
Jonannesen, J. 
1441 



Johansson, Bernard 

Johnseu, Norman 

Jolinsun, Arnold 

Johnson, Aug. H. 

Jolinson, G. M. 

Johnson. John H. 

Johnson, M. 



Johansen, A. -2071 Johnsson, C. J. 
Johansen, uunner Jonsson, P. W. 



Johansen. H. V. 
Johansen, Ole 
Johansen. T. A. 
Jolianson. Axel 

Kaasik, August 
Kallas, A. 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Kalnin, J. 
Katz, Fred. 
Kerr, Will 
Kindiund, Otto 
Kipste, Charley 
Klme, Walter C. 
Kirkhani, George 
Klinteberg, Stenof 
Klotzke, Otto 
Knitzer, A. 

Lanipe, Fred 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larsen, C A. 
Larsen, Hakon 
Larsen, Uana 
Larsen, Herman 
Larsen, J. 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, Kogner 
Larson, Axel 
Larson, Carl 
Larsson, Adolf 



M. 



Jordan, O. 
Jorgensen, Carl W. 
Jorgensen, Waitlier 
Joyce, W. 

Knoppe, Wm. 
Knute, A. 
Koferd, George 
Kornelius. Martin 
Koster, Walter 
Krishjau, K. 
Kristensen, K. D. 
Kristiansen, Jakob 
Kroft, Harry 
Kroon. R. W. -1142 
Krumese, Adam 
Kurki, Emil 
Kvalvik, Oscar 

Lindblom, Edw. 
Lindberg. Wi 
Lind, Gustaf A. 
Lindh. N. W. 
Lindroos. A. W. 
Liverdai, G. 
Lofgren. Richard 
Lohne. Evan 
Lorensen, Nick 
Lorentzeen, Krist 
Lorin, Clirlstian 
Lovgren, Otto 



Larsson. Alfred R. LucKner, A. 
Larsson, Ragnar Lundberg, Ed 



Last. Paul 
Leamey. W. 
Lehtonen, J. O. 
Leht, Peter ' 
Leldecker, B. 
Lidsten. Charles 
Linder. V. 



T. 
Lundeen, Eric F. 
Lund. Eric B. 
Lundquist. Axel 
Lundquisl, R. A. 
Liunstedt, Chris. 
Lyngaard, Jorgen 



Maas, Joseph P. 
Maas, Rudolp . 
Maaila, John 
Macchl, Willy. 
Madseii, Ludvig 
Wagnuson, Carl 
Maki, Ivar 
Malnistrom, E. 
Marckwardt, Carl 
Murtindale, Jolin 
Martinesen, L. 
Martin, J. F. 
Martin, Jos. 
Martin, R. F. 



McNeil, D. R. 
Mein,lohanas, C. 
Melgand, R. 
Metge, Gus 
Mikkelsen, Jack 
Mikkelsen, Mickey 
Mikkelson, Peter 
Miller, R. E. 
Mertheus, H. 
Moller, H. 
Monroe, John 
2604 Monleiro, Joe 
Morris, O. R. 
Moyei. W. 



Skoglund. Harrv 
Skotvik. Ole M. 
Smedsvig. Oluf B, 
Smith. Edward F. 
Smith, W. -707 
Smith, W. 
Spencer. Harry 

Talbert, Frank 
Tamlnga, H. 
Tham. Alec 
Thaysen, A. 
Thee, Rudolph 
Thomsfn, Peder 



Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Swanson, B. 
Swanson. J. -1013 
Swanson, John L. 

V. 
Swlnka, Albert 



Thorsen, Tor. 
Tlngberg. Axel 
T.lersland, Sverre 
Tonissen, P. G. 
Tonnesen. Andreas 
Tompson. Fritz 



Thompson. BenjaminTomsen. Harry 
Thompson. G. E. Torstenscn, Barny 



Thompson, G. F. 
Thompson, John 
Thompson, die 
Thomson. Guss 
Thorsen. Hans K. 
Thorsen, Herman 

Ultman. Th. 

Valarias, L. 
Vallianos. Splros 
Van Reen, R. A. 
Veerkamp, J. J. 

Walenius, Karl E. 
Wallin, Bprger 
Walter. John 
Wank, Roman 
Ward. Jack 



Tellefsen, N. Emil 
Torrance, John 
Trovick, Harold 
Twede, J. 
Tweedale. D. S. 

Uppit. Walter 

Vejooda, F. 
Vickery, Curtis 
Vrlkl. Silas 



Wicklund. Wictor 
Wiik. Frank 
Wilks, John 
Wilier, Carl F. 
Wink, Peter 



Wasserloos, Rudolf Wlrkkl, Reinhold 
WesterKaard, L. Wlssmann, F. W. 

Wezwagar. Andrew 



Zeaberg. Jack 
Zeritt, John 



Zlehr, Ernst 



PACKAGES. 

Andersen, Andov Lawberg. A. W. 

Berllng. J. B. Murray, Con. P. 

Carlson, John Myers. W. 

Dettloff, W. C. F. Neumann, H. J. 

Grenne, O. H. Olsen, H. C. 

GunvaMsen. Ingvald Olsen, R. B. 

Heldenburg. Gus Oslund. O. 

Jacobsen. Alfred Olsson, C. G. -1101 

Jensen. Hans Sander, Otto 

Johansson, Werner Srhaab, A. 

Larsen. C. A. Sraedsvlk. O. B. 

Larsen. Ed. Thorsen. Thor. 
Laurlsen, Niels 



McDermot. William Myrhol, J. P. 
McKeon, Thos. 



Nelsen, C. -936 
Nelsen, Olaf 
Nelson, A. 
Nelson, Adolph H. 
Nelson, A. W. 
Nelson, Harry 
Nelson, Joseph 
Neumann, H. J. 
Nielsen. HaraUl .J 
Nielsen. J. F. 

Odeen, Pete Olsen, F. -1249 

Olim. John Olsen. Fred 

Olansen, Ciiristian Olsen, Oswald 

Ojeda, Leonardo Olsen, Peder 



Nielson, S. 
Niilson- Josef 
Nilson, O. 
Noble, 1- red 
Nolan, James 
Nolen, Axel 
Norberg, J. A. 
Norrls. Norman A. 
Nurmlnen, John G. 



O'Leary, John 
Olesen, Chas. 
Olesen. F. C. 
Olsen. Albert 
Olsen, Amund 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, C. M. 
Olsen, Dave 
Olsen, Kd. J. 
Olsen. E. F. ■ 



Olsen, R. B. 

Olsen, Siegfried 
Olson, David 
Olson, G. F. -562 
Olson, Tliomas 
Olsson, J. 
Osterburg, J. F. 
Osterhofr. H. 
Osterman, John 
1280 Overgaard. Peier 



Paludan, Chas. 
Palu. G. 

PaulsEon. Herman 
Pedersen, George 
Pedersen, Henrik 
Pedersen, Louis 
Pederssen, Conrad 
Peise. G. 
Person. N. F. 
Peterer, Joseph 
Petersen. Chris 
Petersen. Olav 
Petersen, Walter Poulsen, Emil 



Peterson, L. -1389 
Peterson, R. T. 

Peterson, Viktor 
Petter, G. 
Petterson, O. 
Petterson, O. -1551 
Petterssoo, Eugeu 
Pettersson. Konrad 
Phllman. George 
Pollock. T. 
Porter. Henry 
Postuma. K. 



G. 

Petersen. 
Peterson, 



Wllhelm 
Axel 



Poysky. Jahlmar 
Pusner. W. T. 



Ramstad, Andreas 
Rand. J. 
Rasmussen, Axel 
Rasmussen. Jacob 
Rehs. Paul 
Reith. K. C. R. 
Retal, Otto 
Reuter, Ernest 
Ries, Robert E. 

Saalmann, Jooseph Sander. Otto 
Sahlberg. Waldemar Sander. Robert 



Riiwe, Karl 
Rollo, R. 
Ronimerdahl, A. 
Ronger, Henry 
Rosenblad, B. A. 
Ross, W. A. 
Rou. Gustav 
Ruekmleh. Anton 
Rundstrom, Albert 



SEATTLE, WASH., DEEP SEA 

FISHERMEN'S UNION 

LETTER LIST. 



Anderson, Jens 

Arneson, Peter 

Brennan, S. 

Burton, H. 

Berkey, Ole 

Backstrom, C. 

Christensen, John 

Collins, G. 

Condradsen, Julius Nilson, N. A, 

Carroll, James Nilson, Adolf 

Carravan. Walter Nilson. Carl J. F. 

Wm. Ness, John 

Campbell, Danlely Olsen. Oliver 
Degerstrom, Arthur Olsen, Servin 
Dahl, Alfred Osmundsen. Olaf 

Dragland, F. O. Ongstad. P. J. 



Larsen. Olaf 
Larson, Peder 
Larentzen. Harrold 
Lindkvlst. Karl 
Morgan. William 
Moldver. A. 
Munroe. Wallace 
Nelson, Henry 



Elder, Geo. 
Eriksen, Magne 
Engdal, Isak 
Edvords, C. 
Ford, C. F. 
Fowler, Henry 



Olsen, Garnett 
Petersen, Hans 
Pedersen, John A. 
Pedersen, Nils 
Petersen, V. 
Petersen, Julius 



FJellestad, Thomas Petersen, Lars 



Gustafson, C. J 

GIske, Lewis 

Grenkvist, Oscar 

Gorgensen, G. 

Greene, Ben 

Howlett, James 

Hanson, John 

Hedlund, Pete 

Hansen, Gilbert 

Johnson, Ole 

Johansen, John 

Johnsen, Olaf 

Kelly, Mike 

Kaalbelnsen, Alfred White, A 

Larsen, Chas. Walters, G. 



Pedersen, J. R. 
Pedersen. Chas. O. 
Roes. Christ 
Sjosvold, Joe 
Shanahan, Benedict 
Swerdrup. Walter 
Sandberg, Oto 
Thompson, Alf. 
Thomasen, Peder 
Turner. Ruben 
Torkelsen, Fred A. 
Vaagen, Kristofter 
Winter, Edvard 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSn'B UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Phone Douglas 4290 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

BANKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 

Rooms 448-450, Fourth Floor 

Two E)ntrances: 

742 Market Street 49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latett Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



I H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms S27-S29 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 
400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to 12.50 per week, witti all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL. LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
OfBce Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Capa, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



REGISTRATION CARDS AT 

SAILORS' UNION OFFICE, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Members whose names appear in 
this column, should call for their 
card at once: 



Aboling, Mattlss 
Carlson, Carl 
Dablln, Harry 
Fischer, P. A. E. 
Gelsendorfer, Emll 
Gregg, Oliver 
Gustafsson, T. S. 
Hansen, R. F. 
Holmgren, Reinhold 
Hunonen, Cust 
Jacobson, Joakim 
Jensen, Lorents 
Johannsen, A. 
.loyce, William 
Meek, Ole J. 
Mlckelson, Julius 
Moss, A. W. 
Mullen, Harry P. 



Nelson, Axel 
Neumann, John 
Nieison, Wallmar 
Narton, Karl 
Olsen, Olal 
Ozezerskl, Paul 
Paavllalnen, A. 
Patterson, John S. 
Quiroga, Juan 
Rlnne, Hjalmar 
Svendsen, Henry 
Treho, George 
Vlnx, Henry 
Wehr. Fred 
Westorlk, Ingalf 
Wezwager, Andrew 
Wllheimson, Carl 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN!! 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

is now located in Permanent Quarters 

— at — 

20-22 STEUART STREET 

in the new Southern Pacific Building 



ENTIRE NEW STOCK 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



^. ^m^^mi,^ ^ 



\ 

AND 

Porter 

^^ It ^mss 

"^D^ Of America ric^xp 

COPYRIGHT ftTRADE MARK RE6ISTERED 1903 
THIS IS OUR LABEL 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 




DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources ..$7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Glnty 

S. Bissinger J. 8. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



HOTEL MELBA 

Connected with Falstaff Restaurant 

UP-TO-DATE FURNISHED ROOMS BY 

THE DAY, WEEK OR MONTH 

Rooms, 25c to $1.00 per Night 

$1.50 to $3.50 per Week 

Hot and Cold Water In Each Room 

Free Bath 

Phone Kearny 5044 214 JACKSON ST. 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence. 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1416 San Francisco 



Phone Kearny 2518 



HULTEN a RUDOLPH 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Williams 



UNION TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



PACIFIC NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Study for your license with a practical Shipmaster and 

Up-to-Date Navigator 
Pupils studying with me will receive personal attention 

CAPTAIN A. B. SOWDEN, 



Rooms 340-41 Montgomery Block 
Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets 



San Francisco 



KELLEHER fit BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 

SUITS TO ORDER, 
$30.00 TO $50.00 

Union Made 
in Our Own Shop 




Weekly Wages 
No Piece Work 

Eight-Hour Work Day 




JACOB PETERSEN ft SON 

Proprietor* 
Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and —' 

17 STEUART STREET 
IAN FRANCISCO 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



News from Abroad 



The new Panama Canal coaling 
plant at Balboa has been placed in 
legular commercial service. 

The "Brazilian Review" reports 
that one of the German requisitioned 
steamers, the "Rauenfels," has been 
repaired at Bahia, and will be des- 
patched to Macau, Ceara, to load salt. 
The next will probably be the "Gcr- 
trud Woermann," 6456 tons gross. 
She has good passenger accommoda- 
tion and will probably be put on the 
New York route. 

The master of a neutral steamer at 
Hull, England, was fined £40 under 
llie Defense of the Realm regulations 
for failing to reduce the brilliancy of 
the ship's lights while at anchor in 
the Humber. The regulations, to 
which defendant's attention had been 
called on three occasions, provide 
that the normal brilliancy of anchor 
lights should be reduced SO per cent, 
and screened overhead. 

Cuba in response to the food needs 
of the world will plant peanuts and 
beans, says Captain George Reno of 
the Cuban Department of Agricul- 
ture, in order that she may not 
need American animal and vegetable 
oils. The sugar acreage will be in- 
creased this fall with a view to 
producing a crop of 3,500,000 tons 
next year, instead of this year's 
crop of 2,850,000 tons. 

Says the Queensland Worker: "It 
would seem that the profits of some 
of the Australian shipping companies 
have gone up out of sympathy with 
the rising cost of living. The firm 
of Huddart, Parker & Co. made a 
profit of £60,460 in 1914, £90,634 
in 1915, and of £117,140 in 1916. 
Thus, since the starting of the war, 
the company has managed to nearly 
double its annual profits." 

Losses of Norwegian vessels since 
the middle of February, when the 
German submarine campaign started, 
have been so serious that on May IS 
last the Norwegian War Insurance 
Club had a deficit of about 120 mil- 
lion kroner. It is now proposed to 
call upon the owners entered in the 
Clubs to pay an extra contribution 
amounting to 50 per cent, of all the 
war premiums paid from the begin- 
ning of the war until the end of 
April this year. 

The German military attache at 
Madrid has handed to the .Spanish 
government Emperor William's defi- 
nite acceptance of conditions under 
which hospital ships arc to be pro- 
tected from attacks by submarines. 
Seven Spanish officers have gone to 
France to act as commissioners on 
hoard the hospital ships. Under the 
arrangement a neutral commissioner 
will be carried on each hospital ship 
to guarantee that it transports only 
sick and wounded. 

Speaking in the New Zealand 
TTouse of Representatives on July 
10, Sir James Allen (Minister for 
Defence) is reported to have said: 
"I regret to say that something 
over 26,000 men have suffered casual- 
lies up to July 3. I have more re- 
gret to say that out of that total 
7500 will never see New Zealand 
a^ain. It is a big list. I have not 
published it before; I did not like to 
do it, but the time has come when 
we must." Subsequent deaths an- 
nounced in July numbered 333 and 
other casualties 1030, bringing New 
Zealand's total casualties to the end 
of that month to somewhere in the 
vicinity of 28,000, of which nearly 
8000 are deaths. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the WiU 



Disease Under Control.— We arc 
right sorry to hear that the ex-Czar 
of Russia is to be isolated, as we 
do not believe that czaring is con- 
tagious any more. — Grand Rapids 
Press. 



The Druggist's Turn.— The drug- 
gist danced and chortled till the bot- 
tles danced on the shelves. 

"What's up?" asked the soda clerk. 
"Have you been taking something?" 

"No. But do you remember when 
our water-pipes were frozen last 
winter?" 

"Yes, but what " 

"Well," the plumber who fixed them 
has just come in to have a prescrip- 
tion filled."— Pittsburg Chronicle Tel- 
egraph. 



Completing the Record.— A small 
boy who had recently passed his 
fifth birthday was riding in a sub- 
urban car with his mother when 
they were asked the customary ques- 
tion, "How old is the boy?" After 
being told the correct age, which 
did not require a fare, the conduc- 
tor passed on to the next person. 
The boy sat quite still, as if pon- 
dering over some question, and then, 
concluding that full information had 
not been given, called loudly to the 
conductor, then at the other end of 
the car: "And mother's thirty-one!" 
— Minneapolis Tribune. 



A Prompt Decision— Mrs. Will Ir- 
win said at a Washington Square 

tea: 

"The more immodest fashions 
would disappear if men would reso- 
lutely oppose them. 

"I know a woman whose dress- 
maker sent home the other day a 
skirt that was, really, too short al- 
together. The woman put it on. 
It was becoming enough, dear knows, 
but it made her feel ashamed. She 
entered the library, and her husband 
looked up from his work with a dark 
frown. 

" 'I wonder,' she said, with an em- 
barrassed laugh, 'if these ultra-short 
skirts will ever go out?' 

" 'They'll never go out with me,' 
he answered in decided tones."— 
Washington Star. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Do you like a good, long, cool 
smoke? If so, get a package of 
Bagley's Lime Kiln Club Cut 
Plug for your pipe. Manufac- 
tured by John J. Bagley & Co. 
for over fifty years. 



inumwiitKEiu 



iufSg ol tbi i-^ «K 

ftwiintiiiuaiDHU. 1 



gB ^.(^ bsoid fiji ihiAulunlg af tbs * 

r 

I am: aZ ^'* af^^^_^^ I IVlade 




nion 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and Jn a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




HENRY HEINZ 



Phone Douglas 6762 



ARTHUR HEINZ 

Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches ^ 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 

NOTICE ! BOSS OF ROAD OVERALLS 

PRICE, FROM 85 CENTS UP 

Phone Douglas 1737 



Phone Piedmont 54 

FIREMEN, OILERS & WATERTENDERS ! 

WE WILL INSTRUCT YOU 
HOW TO BECOME MARINE ENGINEERS 

VANDER NAILLEN ENGINEERING SCHOOL 

5175 TELEGRAPH AVE., Near Idora Park OAKLAND, CAL. 



Christensen's Navigation Scliool 



257 HA 




Established 1908 
NSFORD BLDG., 268 MARKET STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably know^n 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 



Silverware, Cut Glass and Clocks for Wedding 

Presents 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Qames ^. Sorenseji 

At the Big Red Clock 
and the Chlmee. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 
FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



WHEN 

THE TOY SEASON 

OPENS 

Remember that, de- 
spite difficulties in ob- 
taining Toys equal to 
those of former years, 
the slogan that has 
made Hale's famous 
will apply just as here- 
tofore. 




FOR TOYS 



Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING ® GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 

676 Third Street 

NEAR TOWNSEND, S. F. 



I want you 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50, 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BCD SEAL CKAR CO^ rtANUrACTUBtSS 

133 FIRST STREET, 8. F. 
Phone Douglaa 1660 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



s 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXI, No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1917. 



Whole No. 2454. 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 



Addresses Delivered at the Recent Washington Conference. (3rd Serial.) 



Statement of Mr. Brown (Continued). 

While I am on the floor I wish to speak about 
the cooperation that should exist at the present 
time, referring to the remarks of Captain Gibson. 
I hold no man in this country any more pa- 
triotic than myself. I am first an American, an 
American-born citizen, and have volunteered my 
services and the services of our association wil- 
lingly; the services of the National Associa'tion 
of Engineers has been pledged to the Govern- 
ment; and I sincerely hope we will be able to 
keep that pledge. But we also owe a duty to our 
families. As we go along our man-power is 
going to be exhausted, as soon as the selective 
draft goes into effect, taking, as it does, the 
flower of the male population of the United 
States, and if we are experiencing trouble today 
in getting crews to man the proposed tonnage, 
not saying anything of the Allies at all — we are 
going to have trouble enough to take care of 
our own tonnage, let alone our friendly Allies — 
who is better qualified, Mr. Secretary and Mr. 
Chairman, to advocate the men who will choose 
the calling of the sea than the representatives 
of the dififerent marine organizations? Remove 
this antagonism to organized labor, let them 
realize that they can drive a better bargain with 
organized labor when they encourage the organi- 
zation. The time is not opportune to try to 
bring about disruption through the persecutions 
that we have undergone for the past year. We 
have come through stronger; we have five hun- 
dred or six hundred members more. Some of 
them never will be acceptable to organized 
labor. The conditions they are enjoying are be- 
cause of the influence of organization. It was 
never thought necessary until the request was 
brought very plainly before the steamship com- 
panies. I defy any company or any representa- 
tive here to say where they have voluntarily — 
only when they have anticipated a movement 
owing to the economic conditions, advanced 
wages. 

Any old place is good enough to stick an 
engineer in, and in a majority of the small 
ships, the second and third assistants are stuck 
together in a little 8x10, or 6x8 in some cases 
in the old-time ships. I think we can get to- 
gether, and I believe the gentlemen with whom 
I have done business with will say that I have 
never gone back on anything I have promised 
them. I have done the very best that I could. 

The conditions that Mr. Brown speaks of — our 
National President — the number of engineers in 
excess you have got to do something to turn 
and make the conditions enticing enough to en- 
courage the men to go back to the sea, par- 
ticularly in the engineers' department. It is a 
safe bet that I can get from the Battery to the 
City Hall, from the East River to the North 
River, possibly three hundred marine engineers 
who have left the sea because there were posi- 
tions for them after they got their Chief En- 
gineer's license — they all wanted to be captains 
— and that will be by the program the Shipping 
Board is going to create. There are incon- 
sistencies in the Department of Commerce that 
I want to call the Honorable Mr. Redfield's 
attention to, where a man to-day of limited ex- 



perience can become a second assistant, where 
six months ago he had to have three years' 
experience, and to-day it is two. A man can get 
a second assistant's license to-day where a man 
who has had three years' experience as third 
assistant is denied that because it is against the 
rules. Those are the things that should be 
reconciled. It is the shortage in the junior 
grades that has got to be taken care of, and, 
gentlemen, there is no one better qualified, with 
a little encouragement on the part of ship 
owners, than the representatives of the different 
marine organizations to train them. (Applause.) 

Mr. Furuseth: Mr. Chairman, you have heard 
now from the deck department and from the 
engineers' department — 

Mr. Brown: My remarks, I stated Mr. Fol- 
lett had some data he wanted to submit. 

Mr. Furuseth: Then I will yield for the 
present. 

Secretary .Wilson : Let me call your attention 
to the fact that it is now 12:30, and let me sug- 
gest that we recess until two o'clock. There 
are some of us who have some little work to 
do in the meantime in addition to the luncheon; 
and at the time of our reconvening the gentle- 
man referred to will have the floor. 

Let me also ask that upon reconvening that 
those who are members of the conference will 
come forward to the desk here where provision 
will be made for them to register, so that we 
will have a record of the members of the con- 
ference and what they represent, if they arc 
liere in a representative capacity. 

I have also been asked by Captain O'Connor 
to request that the stevedores meet the long- 
shoremen here in the hall immediately after the 
taking of this recess. 

If there are no objections we will now recess 
until two o'clock. 

(Thereupon, at 12:30 o'clock, P. M., the con- 
ference recessed until 2:00 o'clock this after- 
noon.) 

The Conference reassembled at two o'clock 
P. M., Secretary Wilson presiding. 

Secretary Wilson: The conference will please 
come to order. The representatives of the 
stevedores and longshoremen are requested to 
retire to the lobby for a brief conference. 

At the time of taking recess I had recognized 
a gentlemen in the center of the room. 

Remarks by Mr. Charles Follett. 

Mr. Follett: Mr. Secretary, and gentlemen: I 
represent the Marine Engineers' Beneficial Asso- 
ciation of the United States, and am one of its 
members, and will say it is not the desire, the 
intention or the purpose of the Marine En- 
gineers' Beneficial Association of the United 
States, or its members, to hamper or place any 
obstacle in the way of the Shipping Board, or 
in fact anyone interested in the United States 
Merchant Marine from obtaining an ample sup- 
I)ly of officers to carry on the great volume of 
commerce that it is expected to have to be 
transported across the seas. 

With particular reference to the Marine En- 
gineers, there is a delegation here representing 
every district in this country, and from experi- 
ence and investigation we feel that there is abso- 



lutely no cause for fear that there will be a 
shortage of American citizen marine engineers to 
take care of all the steamships contemplated or 
contracted for by the United States Shipping 
Board for private corporations, entering in the 
shipbuilding or transportation business under the 
American flag. 

The report of the Steamboat Inspection Ser- 
vice for the year 1916 indicates that there are 
7,347 steam vessels of all classes under our flag. 
The business employed in, the crew list, the 
tonnage of each and every one of these vessels 
have been observed by members in this delega- 
tion from the records furnished by the Steam- 
boat Inspection Service, and a liberal allowance 
made for the necessary engineers required to 
man each and every ship or boat. And from 
our finding we state the opinion that it will not 
require more than 13,715 marine engineers to 
operate each and every steamer under the 
.American flag. 

The information obtained from the ofifice of 
the Steamboat Inspection Service is to the 
effect that there are approximately 29,000 
licensed marine engineers in the United States. 
This would indicate that more than 15,000 are 
either unemployed or following some vocation 
in life in which their marine license is not re- 
quired. But if conditions were created making a 
demand for their services there would be a 
large proportion of them ready to avail them- 
selves of the opportunity to go to sea. 

We believe if the United States merchant 
marine is to be built up, wc, as citizens of 
this nation, will directly and indirectly con- 
tribute to its upbuilding, and that the positions 
created for the operation of these vessels 
should be distributed, as far as possible, to 
American citizens, and with the large per- 
centage of United States licensed marine en- 
gineers, only those actually required to operate 
the present fleet under our flag, together with 
the educational program of the United States 
Shipping Board, coupled with several thousand 
firemen and water tenders, who have ex- 
perience which qualifies them to obtain licenses 
as marine engineers, there is really no reason 
to fear at this time that there will be a 
shortage of such officers. In reality, from the 
appearance of the present situation, most any 
emergency could be readily taken care of. 
At any rate to a fair-minded person it would 
seem that the laws protecting both the Amer- 
ican merchant marine and those employed in 
the service should not have been suspended 
until by experience it is shown that an 
emergency requiring a move of that kind 
exists. 

It is a well known fact that up to the pres- 
ent time the Sbiiiping Board has been able 
to obtain from among the citizens of the 
L^nited States all the qualified men required 
to carry on their building and repairing pro- 
grams, and that there are a great many ap- 
plications for positions at the present time 
in excess of those which the Shipping Board 
at present can furnish. In conclusion, I desire 
lo read a letter, which was received from 
the officer of a recruiting service of the United 
.States Shipping Board addressed to the Marine 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Engineers' I'unilui.il .\ssuciation, Xcw York 

City. 

"Gentlemen: 

"The Sea Service Bureau has been formed 
as a part of the recruiting service. This 
bureau attempts to place graduates of our 
schools of navigation and engineering either as 
junior officers or regular officers. We arc 
writing to ask if your organization will not co- 
opciate with us in helping to place the men 
who have already received licenses. This can 
1)c done by your writing to us at any time 
that you have positions available. The writer 
expects to be in New York some day next 
week, and hopes to be able to be at your 
office and go over the matter in detail." 

Gentlemen, I think that this indicates, the 
statistics which we have investigated, indi- 
cate that there really is no shortage of marine 
engineers. The method by >vhich these men 
will be pressed into service is something to 
be consiflered in the future. But I hope and 
trust that at the conclusion of this conference 
it will be decided that American citizens will 
he the ones who will man our vessels, and that 
the doors will be closed to all aliens to act 
as officers aboard of American ships. 

I thank you. (Applause.) 

Mr. Irving L. Evans: I should like to ask 
what provision has been made for classification 
of the number of engineers who are available, 
eligible and qualified for sea service. In other 
words, I should like to have some idea of the 
classification of engineers. 

Mr. FoUett: I would state that the investi- 
gation has not been gone into to that extent. 

Statement of Mr. Bruce Gibson. 
Representing the Engineers' Beneficial Associa- 
tion, 17 Battery Place, New York City. 

Mr. 'Gibson: Mr. Chairman, and Mr. Secre- 
tary: I feel that had a conference of this 
kind been called in 1914, previous to the Ex- 
ecutive Order of that period, that there might 
not have been the inharmonious feeling 
amongst those that sail on ships. We felt at 
that time that that order had been issued with- 
out our having opportunity to present our side 
of the case, or the men available. I know 
personally, in 1914, I was at that time Secre- 
tary of the Marine Engineers' Association at 
San Francisco, that throughout the United 
States there was a surplus of men, who were 
idle and walking the streets looking for posi- 
tions, and when that order was issued natural- 
ly they resented it, but in time that feeling 
wore away and the matter was passed over. 
Those ships that were allowed under the flag 
at the time brought their officers with them. 
I do not know how many of those foreign 
officers, if any, have become American citizens, 
but as far as I know they all accepted, were 
tendered and accepted a provisional license. 

Now, I think we are going to gain some- 
thing here to-day with this conference, and I 
wish to state, as far as I have been able to 
observe, both when I was Secretary of the 
local organization, and afterward as National 
President for two years of the Marine En- 
gineers' Beneficial Association, that the steam- 
ship interests received all the consideration 
they asked for from the Government, the rules 
and laws were changed to meet their requests, 
and while we did not approve of them we 
accepted them. We accepted them as they 
were then. We could not be held up in the 
position of trying to make a shortage of 
engineer officers. 

After the execution of the Executive Order 
in 1914, in 1916 the Board of Supervising in- 
spectors modified the rules allowing a person 
of 19 years of age, instead of 21 years of age, 
to receive license, porvided they could pass 
the examination which was given them by the 
local inspectors. Following that another modi- 
fication was made in the rules, reducing the 
lime from 36 months to 24 months on the 
Lakes, Bays and Sounds for engineers to be- 
come eligible for an examination for a higher 
grade. We did not and could not see where 
there was a shortage of men, but we discussed 
it with the Board of Supervising Inspectors, 
w^ho were sitting at that time, and we agreed 
harmoniously that the matter should be tried 
out to see whether it would work out, that 
any of these younger men, or in the reduced 
time from 36 to 24 months, would create a 
surplus of engineers. Then on July 3rd of this 
year, an Executive Order was issued by the 
IVcsident, and I feel that all the facts were 
not presented to the President regarding the 
situation. I think if we could have had an 
opportunity to take that up with the President, 
or the proper officials at that time, we could 
have demonstrated that there was no shortage 
of men, and there is not to-day, as far as I 
am able to learn. 

On the last Executive Order, foreigners, and 
all except foreigners at war with this country, 
and Allies, are eligible to receive a license of 
some description with the United States Gov- 
ernment and sail on vessels engaged in foreign 
commerce. How far they will take advantage 
of this I do not know; none of us know, but 
we rather feel it is a hardship on those who 
have put their lives in on this business, unless 
there is really a shortage. 

Now I want to make a few remarks, and I 
am glad a representative of the Shipping Board 
is here, unon this position of an assumed 
shortage. If there is, the matter can be met 



very easily without throwing down the bars 
and letting the foreigners come in and have 
the advantage of what we have worked for, 
or what those who have been in the business 
before us have striven for and obtained. 

Regarding the schools which have been in- 
augurated by the Shipping Board, or a com- 
mittee of the Shipping Board, I think they arc 
following the wrong tactics. A short time 
ago I was in Boston, Massachusetts, and I 
met Mr. Howard, a professor of the Massa- 
chusetts School of Technology, who is handling 
the School of Marine Engineers, and I had a 
talk with him, and I advocated, as the onlj' 
feasible way to handle that school situation, 
and I am going to put tliis problem up to 
you now which I put up to those gentlemen 
in Boston. I told them to go down to the 
organizations representing the seamen, the fire- 
men, the oilers, the water tenders, and so forth. 
They would get practical men, men that have 
put in some time in either the capacity of 
a sailor or in the fireroom or in the engine 
room. Take those men, give them what tech- 
nical knowledge they might need for the busi- 
ness they are to follow, and then let them 
receive their licenses. Those men could still 
continue to sail as seamen or oilers, water ten- 
ders and firemen, and would be available at 
any time that a shortage might present itself 
to fill any vacancies as deck officers or en- 
gineer officers. I believe that is the only 
feasible view to follow in the conduct of 
these schools. Take the men with the prac- 
tical knowledge. On deck, the sailor under- 
stands that work. In the engine room the 
oilers, the water tenders and the firemen have 
the practical experience of working with the 
engineer in the general repairs in that depart- 
ment. They become familiar with that work. 
We, who have licenses, have all been through 
some of those positions, after serving a certain 
length of time as the law requires on vessels. 

As I understood Secretary Redfield this 
morning, in an emergency on the Pacific Coast 
landsmen were put on the vessels and the 
vessel had to return on account of their sea- 
sickness or something of that kind. 

Secretary Redfield: That was in Norfolk, 
\'irginia. 

I\fr. Gibson: I beg pardon, but that is the 
condition. There is shown the inconsistency 
of taking the landsman, putting him in this 
school, or schools that you are starting, and 
giving him two months of a hurried educa- 
tion and telling him to go down and get his 
license and go to sea. He has never been 
aboard a vessel; he does not know the condi- 
tions he is going to meet, and he is not 
going to get accustomed in a trip. That will 
take him several trips, and the probability is 
he will become disgusted and will not follow 
the custom of the sea, and there is nothing to 
require him to go if he does not want to go, 
after giving him this license. But, take the 
men I have referred to, those men will stay 
with the calling of the sea because they arc 
in that position at the present time, and I 
think you will find material that will develop 
into good officers, whether it be in the engine 
room or on deck, and far better than men 
you may pick up on the shore that do not, 
of their own volition, take to the sea. That 
is the solution, I think, of the school question. 

On the shortage of officers you have just 
heard that there are something like 15,000 li- 
censed engineers that arc not working on 
their licenses at the present time. I believe 
that those men should, as patriotic citizens, 
if they are needed in the crisis, come forward 
and go to sea. If they want their licenses 
let them use them in that way, and I think 
we could overcome it that w^ay. That takes 
care of the shortage question, I think, from 
my point of view, if the shortage does develop. 

I now want to speak for a moment on a 
proposition of allowing the foreigner to come 
in on the American vessels. I have no antip- 
athy to a foreigner, but I am an. American 
born, and I feel that what I have been through 
needs protection, and I think in America we 
ought to protect the Americans, or the Ameri- 
can citizens, and that is why I do not be- 
lieve in letting down the bars. I am from 
the Pacific Coast, and there is one nationality 
that could come under this Executive Order 
that would put a taste in our mouths that I 
do not think we would ever be able to cleanse. 

I want to quote from some authorities rep- 
resenting the steamship interests. One will 
be from a prominent steamship man, whom 
you all know cither personally or by reputa- 
tion, on the American citizen proposition. 
The other quotation I will give you will be 
from the Chamber of Commerce of one of the 
largest cities in the United States. I am read- 
ing from the Congressional Record of August 
8, 1914, when this same question, or one sim- 
ilar to it, was agitating that body and the 
shipping interests, as well as the men that fol- 
lowed the calling. At that time the proposition 
was up to allow foreign vessels coastwi.se privi- 
leges. I want to read a- telegram sent from 
San Francisco, California, on .\iigust 7, 1914, 
to Senator T. E. Burton, and this telegram, T 
will say, was signed bv Robert Dollar, whom 
I think vou all know in one way or another. 

"On our British ships we are now paying 
our officers full American wages. Clark's 
amendment must be changed. At present ut- 
terly impossible to get sufficient number of 



reliable and trustworthy officers, and we will 
never consent to send our vessels to sea with 
incoinpeteiit officers, and under sucli unworthy 
conditions we would not change the flag. My 
suggestion is to give the masters and officers 
now on ships the privilege of immediate cit- 
izenship, and if they then decline, then others 
must be found, so that full complement of 
licensed officers shall be American citizens." 

There is one other I want to read to yon 
from a prominent steamship man on the Pa- 
cific coast, showing his feeling in the matter. 
This is from the Congressional Record of 
August 14, 1914. I will only read a portion of 
this telegram to bring out the point I am 
dwelling on. This is dated San Francisco, 
California, August 13, 1914. 
"Hon. Theodore E. Burton, 

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. 

"We must earnestly protest against bill ad- 
mitting foreign ships to coastwise trade. The 
American coastwise merchant marine has been 
brought to a point second only to that of 
Great Britain by paying the highest standard 
of wages to American labor." 

That is signed by the Matson Navigation 
Company. William Matson. 

Now, Captain Mattson has stated that the 
efficiency of the American merchant marine 
was brought forth by paying the highest 
standard of wages, and that is a contention 
that I think is good, that cheap labor brings 
nothing. 

One other authority I will now read to you 
is from a pamphlet published by the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce. It was issued in the 
year 1916. 

"If an adequate merchant shipping is im- 
portant to our national security it is absolutely 
indispensable to our military and naval defense. 
In the event of war between the United States 
and a foreign enemy our Government would 
instantly require hundreds of auxiliary vessels, 
scouts, mine layers, fuel ships, and hospital 
ships, which could be provided only from the 
merchant service. Many of these can be pro- 
cured from the coastwise fleet, but not enough, 
for a large part of this domestic tonnage is 
not adapted to ocean going voyaging. The 
country has not yet forgotten the humiliation 
of seeing its proud battleship fleet escorted 
iiround the world by a motley crowd of Brit- 
ish, Dutch and Italian colliers, because no 
American vessels were to be had. That was 
in a time of peace, but the lack of such auxil- 
iary ships, and especially of loyal American 
officers and men in war might fatally cripple 
our fighting force and bring apalling disaster 
to the nation." 

The Boston Chamber of Commerce then 
went on record as saying wc must have loyal 
American officers on American vessels, espe- 
cially at a time when the country w-as at war, 
and, undoubtedly, in 1916, they did not predict 
we should be drawn into this conflict, but we 
are, and to meet that none but Americans 
should man American vessels. 

If you let down the bars and man our ships 
with foreigners, will those that you are asking 
to be allowed to man your ships, will they 
rally to the colors of this nation? What was 
the purpose of the Canadian regiment of 
Kilties ill coming to the United States, but to 
try and stir up patriotism, in the British and 
Canadian subjects, to get them to play their 
part in this world's struggle, and at a farewell 
luncheon given at the Hotel Biltmore in New- 
York, the Colonel of this regiment stated that 
he had secured but 300 recruits. He publicly 
upbraided his countrymen, both Canadian and 
British, for refusing to do their duty as loyal 
citizens. If your request is allowea, will they, 
after you have placed them on your vessels, 
and vou have turned aside the American citi- 
zen, the olTspring of the founders of liberty, 
the backbone of this country, will these same 
non-citizens that you are to officer your ships 
with, and which will erect a barrier that will 
forever confront the American boy and pre- 
vent him from ever again taking up the fol- 
lowing of the sea, be it in the engine-room or 
on the deck, will these men from other shores 
support the Constitution of the United States, 
will they respond to the call of the Nation, 
should that hour arrive? These are questions 
that you should answer, if not publicly, in your 
conscience. 

Now, gentlemen, that is all I desire to say 
at the present time, but I understood this 
morning from Captain Gibson that he offered 
his services now as a master of a transport. 
I will go as an engineer of that transport, 
with Captain Gibson, and if there is anybody 
by the name of Gibson that will go as cook, 
we have our crew. We will weigh anchor, 
and to the tunc of "The Gibsons are com- 
ing" start across the big pond. 

I thank you. (Applause.) _ 

Secretary Wilson: I think there is a little 
misapprehension from what some of the speak- 
ers said as to the nature of the Executive 
order of which they speak. It appears to be 
discussed as if it were opening to the alien 
of the American merchant marine generally 
and for all time. Neither is true. It is only 
opened for the period of the war, and only 
opened in the foreign trade. It has no relation 
of any kind to any other part of the marine. 
That ought to be made clear. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Unions Include All Regardless of Skill. 

Trade-union agitation in the Chicago 
stockyards is cited by the Chicago Labor 
News as another answer to "professional 
detractors," who claim the American Fed- 
eration of Labor is only interested in 
"skilled" workers. The Labor News says: 

"For many years professional detractors 
with near-labor schemes to propagate have 
shrieked from the housetops that the 
American Federation of Labor is a narrow- 
minded job trust of skilled workers and 
that it cares not a rap for the interest of 
the hordes of women, unskilled workers, 
negroes, foreigners and other classes less 
fortunately situated in industry. This ill- 
founded slander has been given the lie in- 
numerable times in trade-union practice 
but never more emphatically and conclu- 
sively than in the big organization cam- 
])aign now being conducted in the Union 
stockyards by the trade-union movement. 

'Tf the trade union were the guild of 
skilled, male, white, Americanized workers 
it is claimed to be, about the last place it 
would seek adherents is in the packing in- 
dustry of this city. Of the 40,000 workers 
employed in this great industry fully 75 
])er cent, are entirely unskilled ; great num- 
bers arc women ; more than 50 per cent, 
are foreigners and at least 35 per cent, arc 
negroes. (Of the latter it may be said 
there arc more working within the square 
mile of the stock yard district than in any 
other equal space in America.) Yet, the 
trade-unions have taken up the cudgel for 
these heterogeneous masses. They arc 
going to spend unlimited amounts of time, 
money and energy organizing them. In 
this big joint movement for organization 
there's not a single worker in the stock 
yards, let his race, creed, color, sex, na- 
tionality or age be what it may, but who 
can find a place. 

"Des])itc the vilifications of its detractors, 
the American Federation of Labor is a 
bona fide movement of the whole working 
class." 



Federal Inquiry Into Law-and-Order Mobs 

President Wilson will ap])oint a commis- 
sion to investigate the deportation of west- 
ern workers and the activities of .Arizona 
"Loyalty" leagues and other "law-and- 
order" mobs. 

Following a conference with President 
Ciom]iers, who ])resented documentary evi- 
dence showing that workingmen in Ari- 
zona, \\'ashington, Michigan and elsewhere 
were denied their rights as citizens, Presi- 
dent Wilson asked the Council of National 
Defense to take the situation under advise- 
ment. After President Gompers described 
the situation to the members of the Coun- 
cil of National Defense and its Advisory 
Commission, it was unanimously decided 
to ask the President to ap])oint a com- 
mission to investigate the dejiortation of 
workers from their homes and States, their 
imprisonment and other illegal acts, and 
to make report to the President, the Coun- 
cil, or both. 

In its report to President Gompers on 
Arizona conditions, John Alurrav and R. 



D. Riggs, now in Washington as represent- 
atives of the Arizona State Federation of 
Labor, declared that "vigilance commit- 
tees rule Arizona and the Governor holds 
conferences with them." 

The Arizona imionists also report that 
the Bisbee deportation was to be du])li- 
cated at Globe, according to railroad em- 
ployes, but the "Loyalty" league discov- 
ered that engineers, firemen and conductors 
had agreed to refuse to handle any train 
used for deportation purposes. It was 
then planned to abduct by automobile, but 
Colonel W'hite, in charge of the federal 
military forces of that district, blocked 
the scheme. 

Murray and Riggs declared that "it is 
the conviction of a large majority of Ari- 
zona's citizens that, if this rule by vigi- 
lantes continues much longer, the .State 
will plunge into a revolutionary ui)heaval.'' 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Draft Deported Men Who Can't Go Home. 

Copper interests of Arizona are chuck- 
ling over the "smart" trick of the district 
exemption board, which has drafted 476 
of the 1200 men deported from Bisl)ee on 
July 12 last. The Cochise County (Bis- 
bee) board reported that the men had 
failed to appear for examination. The 
"humor" of this statement is appreciated 
when it is known that armed guards, 
called the "Loyalty" league, and financed 
by copper interests, have surrounded Bis- 
bee and threaten to shoot any deported 
man who attem])ts to return to his home. 
These guards refused admittance to a com- 
mittee appointed by the Arizona State Fed- 
eration of Labor at its recent Clifton con- 
vention to investigate conditions. 

"Law and order" mobs in Arizona will 
be less enthusiastic when the curtain is 
rung down on the last scene of the Bisbee 
and Globe (Ariz.) deportations, j^redicts 
John Murray and R. D. -Rigg, now in 
Washington, D. C, to explain to American 
Federation of Labor oiificials the working 
of Arizona "Loyalty" leagues. Murray is 
a member of the Typographical LTnion 
and Rigg is recording secretary of the 
Globe Miners' Union. They are repre- 
senting the Arizona State Federation of 
Labor. 

These "Loyalty" leagues have the ap- 
proval of business men, who will sing a 
different song, when taxes pile up to meet 
court costs. At Globe forty-two miners 
were arrested for "rioting." because thev 
formed a picket line on a county road. 
The unionists are out on bail of $1000 
each. They have demanded a change of 
venue on the ground that a fair trial is 
impossible in Glol)e. \Vhen Gila County, 
in which Globe is located, faces these 
court costs, because of the large number of 
witnesses that will be necessarily sub- 
poenaed, the innuhcr of (ilohc business men 
who defend "Loyalty" leagues can l)e 
counted on one hand. 



The factory child, denied the right to learn 
to play, is the progenitor of the man who 
can do no more than toy with the most 
serious afifairs. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA, 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., PIull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM, 

Internationale Zeemansverceniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forcning Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansverceniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
tcrra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinhciros c Remandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime dos Emprcgados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
taring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers 



The British Columbia Federation 
uf Labor, in convention assembled 
at Vancouver, empowered the execu- 
tive committee by a vote of 56 to 
K to call a general strike siiould 
any member be conscripted. 

It is stated in well-informed quar- 
ters that Germany promises to sup- 
ply Holland with a certain quantity 
of coal, with the proviso that if 
Holland wants more coal Dutch 
workmen nuist I)e sent to Germany 
to fetch it from the mines. In this 
case, as every miner can produce 
twenty tons of coal per month, the 
(piantity promised would be in- 
creased by twenty tons niontlily 
for every Dutch worker sent to Ger- 
many. 

The British .Admiralty have sent 
an intimation to Portsmouth, in re- 
ply to a dockyard deputation which 
recently made representations to Dr. 
MacNamara, financial secretary to 
the Admiralty, that the maximum 
scale of pay for skilled laborers em- 
ployed on productive work involving 
the skillful use of hand or machine 
tools is to be advanced from 31s. to 
37s. weekly, for hired men, and 35s. 
for established men dating from 
September 2. 

The second Pan-American Con- 
gress on Child Welfare will be held 
in Montevideo, the capital of Ur- 
uguay, March 17-24, 1918. The exe- 
cutive committee, of which Dr. Luis 
Morquio, a pediatrist of Montevideo, 
is chairman, extends a cordial invi- 
tation to all societies and persons 
interested to become members and, 
if possible, to attend. Four sec- 
tions have been arranged — sociology 
and legislation, education, hygiene 
and medicine. In each country of 
the three Americas a committee has 
been authorized to enroll members, 
secure papers, draft resolutions, and 
take charge of the local affairs of 
the congress. Julia C. Lathrop is 
chairman of the committee for the 
United States. 

East African employers of farm 
labor have become alarmed by an 
increase of wages which threatens 
to be permanent. Indeed, this in- 
crease exceeds a rate of 100 per 
cent. "Good men," formerly paid 
$1.95 per month and perquisites 
valued at about $1.95 per month, 
have become porters in army service, 
and less efficient men now are paid 
from twelve to fifteen rupees ($3.89 
to $4.87) per month. The explana- 
tion given by the American consul 
at Mombasa why such compensation 
represents a fair wage, namely that 
"the average native .African laborer 
is only about one-fifth as efficient as 
the white workman and requires 
much more supervision" has a fa- 
miliar ring to it. 

The current issue of the British 
Labor Gazette reports that the pre- 
vious high level of employment was 
maintained in July, and much over- 
time was worked in many of the 
principal trades. There was some 
time lost on account of holidays, 
especially in Scotland. In Ireland 
there was some unemployment in 
certain trades. Employment in coal 
mining was very good in most dis- 
tricts; there was some slackness in 
a few, especially in Scotland. It 
was still very good at iron mines 
and openworks, lead mines, and shale 
mines, and good at tin mines. At 
quarries employment was good on 
the whole, except at slate quarries 
in North Wales and in building 
sandstone quarries. 



THE UNION STORES OF THE U. S. A. 

We Manufacture and Sell 

Direct to You the Best Union 

Made Shirts in the World, 

Saving You the Middleman's 

Profit. 



UNION LABEL 

SHIRTS 

NIGHTSHIRTS 

PAJAMAS 

COLLARS 

COLLAR BUTTONS 

UNDERWEAR 

SOCKS 

NECKWEAR 

SUSPENDERS 

ARM BANDS 

GARTERS 

GLOVES 

BELTS 

SUIT CASES 

BAGS 

OVERALLS 

COOKS' GOODS 

WAITERS' SUPPLIES 

BARBERS' COATS 

ASK FOR THE CLERKS' UNION CARD EVERYWHERE 

EAGLESON & CO. 

1118 MARKET STREET, Opposite 7th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

717 K Street, Sacramento 112-116 So. Spring Street, Los Angeles 



Get Our Union Label Catalogue, Endorsed by 

S. F. Labor Council S. F. Label Section 

S. F. Building Trades Council 

California State Building Trades Council 




Named thoes are frequently madt in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOK 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for abaenca 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Booi and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON. MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Cbas. L. Baine. 8M:.-TrMs. 



San Pedro Letter Liet. 



SAN PEDRO. CAL. 



M. BROWN &t SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 
And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 
109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

122 Sixth Street, San Pedro 

PROPRIETORS OF 

STANDARD BOTTLING WORKS 

Manufacturers and Bottlers of All Flavors Union Bottler 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 
531 Front Street 
Two Entrances 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529i'2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated in the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerichs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. _^ 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



Wllford 
A. -1341 
C. E. 
Olaf 
Frank 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

\jo» Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Affenu 

Horhor Atoam Tjmndrr 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront. Cal. 



Tlie Anglo -GalUaTrusl Gonipany 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 

offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS.. $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 16,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



.\.«pe. Theo 

Andersen. A. 11 

Anderson, 

Aalto. K. 

Andersen, 

Andersen, 

Andersen, 
-332 

Button. R. S. 

Bower, Oosta 

Blomgren, M. A. 

Rentsen. Hans B. 

Beier. John C. 

Bchvens, Fred 

Brown, Joe 

Bergesen, Slvert 

Brown, G. 

Brlen, Hans 

Bentsen, Hans B. 

C.Trlson. John 

Collins. Ed. 

Carlson, C. V. 

Christensen, A. 

Carlson, R. C. 

Carlson, Gustaf 

Christensen, E. 

Drasbeck, Carl 

Dougal, A. 

Ellison, Samuel 

Emmery, J. A. 

Enstrom, Carl 

Eklund, Swen 

Farrell, H. D. 

Folvig, John 

Fosberg. Leonard 

Gaeve. Willy 

Gieesler, E. 

Gerhardt. John 

Gerard, Albert 

Hill, Chas. 

Holmstrom, F. 

Hansen, Bernard 

Hoek. A. 

Hunter, Ernest 

Hagger, F. W. 

Hednian, John M. 

.lanssen, Hans E. 

Johnson, S. 

Jansson, H. E. 

Johansen, Algot 

Janssen, Bernh. 

Johanson, N. A. 

Johnson, Gunnar 

Johansen. Fred 

Jansson, Bernhard 

Kartheuser, Otto 

Kern back 

Klotz, Arnold 

Kipper, Henry 

Karre, M. V. 

Kristensen, Niels 

Kind. H. 

Larsen, Slgvard 

Lyngquist, H. 

Larsen, Martin 
Frank 
Johan 
Bruno 
Lewy 



Laakso 
Lassen, 
Lorenz, 
Larsen, 



Larsen. L. 
Lund. J. W. M. 
Ijabrentz. Max 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Mutka. Anton 
MoUer, Earl R. 
MoUor. Christian 
Magnussen. Sigurd 
Marlon. J. 
Mamers. Carl 
Miller, R. E. 
Metz. John 
Minners, Herman 
Moberg. Karl G. 
N. P. -1504 
Olsen. Thomas 
Olsson. O. S. 
Olsen, Ole W. 
Pederson. Chris 
Pashe, John 
Fetter, G. 
Pylkan. William 
Pera. Gust! 
Petersen. Olaf 
Peterson, K. E. 

-903 
Petersen, C. -1493 
Paulsen, James 
Pederson, John 
Peterson, Alfred 
Pedersen. Alf. -1323 
Palmquist, A. 
Peterson, Hugo 
Paterson, C. V. 
Petersen. N. -1234 
Rosenthal. Walter 
Reuter, Ernest 
Raaum. Harry 
Rivera. John 
Retal, Otto 
Raun. Einar 
Stolzerman. Emil 
Swanson. E. 
Shedin. Hans 
Schroeder, Ernest 
Schlieman. F. 
Swartou. Charlie 
Sonnebom. Ben 
Swanson. James 
Selewskl. Franz 
Schroeder. .Mfred 
Selander. W. 
Taft. Jes 
Teague, Oscar 
Thygessen. John 
Thomas. Henry 
Thirup. C. 
Thompson. Maurice 
Thoren. G. A. 
Thompson. Alex 
Wolf. A. E. 
Wiig. Theo 
Walker. John 
Warkala, John 
Tsberg. Adolf 

Packages. 
Bluker. John 
Kruger. Wm. 



Portland, Or., Letter Liet. 



Anderson, Gust H. 
Bohm, Frank 
Brandt, Arvid 
Bohm, Franz 
Carlson, Chas. B. 
Carlera, Peter 
Dully, Alexander 
Elliot, Austin E. 
Fisher. Fritz 
Guidersen, E. 
Gregory, W. 
Geiger. Joe 
Harding. Ellis 
Hylandsr. Gust 
Hartman, Fritz 
Itmey, Fred 
Jorgensen, Robert 
Jones. H. 
Jchansson. Charles 

-2407 
Johnson, Karl 
Jensen, H. T. 
Kaskinen, Albert 
Kristensen, Wm. 
Kroon, Al. 
Kelly. Wm. 
Knofsky, E. W. 
Laatzen. Hugo 
Larsen, Hans 



Mitchel, J. W. 
Mehrtens. H. 
Nlelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, A. S. 
Olson, David 
Okvist. Gust 
Oglive, Wm. 
Paulson, Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Paul, George 
Peterson. M. 
Palmqvist, Albert 
Petersen, Anton 

-1675 
Rensmand. Robert 
Rasmussen, O. 
Rubins. Carl A. 
Samuelson, Sam 
Stinesson. Harold 
Siebert. Gust 
Swanson, Oskar 
Swanson, John I,. 
Tuhkanen. Johan J 
Westengren, C. W. 
Wagner, W. M. 
Welllnger, L. 
Warren, Geo. 
Willing, Wm. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter Liat. 



Anderson, Chris. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andeson, A. P. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Berdwlnen, Bob 
Bohm, Gust 
Browen. Alexander 
Brogard. N. 
Brun, Mattla 
Brant. Max 
Carlson. Adolph M. 
Crentz. F. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen. Dltrlch 
Christensen, Louis 
Davis, Frank A. 
Donaldson. Harry 
Ekman, Gust 
Ellingsen, Erllng 
Fattlnger. August 
Fisher, Charley 
Frohne, Robert 
Gerard, Albert 
Grant, August 
Gray. William 
Gronlund, Oskar 
Gronros, Oswald 

Gueno. Plte 
Gran, Axel 
Grag. William 
Hansen, Tborleif 
Hansen, Jactt 
Hansen, Max Owe 
Harley, Alex 
High, Edward 
Holmroos, Alln 
Hedrick, Jack 
Jensen, L. 
Johansson, Arvo 
.Tohanssen. John F. 
Johnsen, Carl 



Johnson, Hans 
Johnson, Hllmar 
Kessa, Theo. 
Kord, Hjalmar 
Kreander, Wlctor 
Kuldsen, John 
LIgoskI, Joe 
Lohtonen, Arthur 
Longren, Charley 
Malkoft, Peter 
Melners, Herman 
Meyers, George 
Nelson, Aug. 
Newman, I. 
Nielsen. Alf. W. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nilsen, Harry 
Olsen, Alf. 
Olsson, C. 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Peterson, Nels 
Pettersen, Carl 
Rahfl, J. 
Risenius, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Sandquist. Gunnar 
Semlth, Ed. 
Schenk, Albert 
Shemwall. Sigurd 
Sckultz, Bemt. 
Thom, Alek. 
Thomland, John 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Waales, Edgar 
Wagner, Ed. 
Wedequlst, Axel 
Williams, T. C. 
Williams, John 
Wolf, R. G. 

Packages. 
Ellingsen. Erllng 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Negotiations for a charter of the Pacific Steam- 
ship Company's "Senator" for one or more 
voyages to the Orient are in progress, accord- 
ing to advices from Seattle. 

Frank Waterhouse, head of the company 
bearing his name, classes as premature the 
announcement that his company is to enter the 
coastwise trade, practically denying a report 
from San Francisco to that efTect. 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co. have been appointed 
chartering agents for the Commonwealth of Aus- 
tralia and are ready to entertain offers for 
tonnage, both steam and sail, to load at Aus- 
tralian ports for the west coast of either South 
or North America. 

An appeal has been sent to President Wilson 
by the Philippine Farmers' Congress, now in 
session, asking that he take measures to re- 
lieve transportation difficulties on the Pacific 
Ocean as far as they affect the products of the 
Philippine Islands. 

The Wilmington Shipbuilding Company and 
Sudden & Christenson, who had made tentative 
plans to establish new yards on the inner 
harbor of San Pedro, and Fellows & Stewart, 
who also hoped to get Government contracts, 
will probably not proceed further in view of 
the determination not to order more wooden 
ships for the Government. 

Another steel shipbuilding plant was added 
to Seattle's list when John McAteer, hitherto 
a wooden shipbuilder, announced the acquisition 
of a Government contract for steel ships and the 
immediate conversion of his plant into a plant 
capable of building such vessels. He has 
formed an affiliation with the National Steel 
Construction Company occupying an adjoining 
site and will build the vessel jointly. 

Charles Rose, Charles Buckow and Cliff W. 
Neward, formerly first officer, and second-mate 
and cook of the American steamer "Costa 
Rica" plying from San Francisco to Bristol 
Bay, Alaska, filed a libel against the ship in 
the Federal District Court of $1606 for wages 
and provisions. They say that during a period 
of three months they did not get any pickles, 
mustard or vinegar, that the potatoes were 
unfit to cat and that all food was reduced one- 
third. 

The Benicia Shipbuilding Corporation has 
been awarded contracts for the construction of 
two wooden steamers for the United States 
Emergency Fleet Corporation. The vessels are 
to be built on the Ferris plan with a dead- 
weight capacity of 3500 tons. The general di- 
mensions of these craft are to be as follows: 
Length between perpendiculars, 268 feet; breadth 
molded, 4,S feet 2 inches; depth molded at side, 
26 feet; designed load draft (full), 23 feet 6 
inches. 

The plant of the Grant-Smith-Guthrie Mc- 
Dougall Company, at Portland, is rapidly being 
completed. Four sheds covering ways are 
finished, four more are under way and much of 
the yard is planked, with saw sheds and other 
structures up. Pile drivers are engaged in 
driving foundations for the eighth set of ways 
and another is driving those for the launching 
slips. The plant will turn out fourteen ships 
there under existing contracts, and with eight 
in the ways going it will be the largest working 
in this vicinity. 

Both the Alaska Steamship Company and the 
Pacific Steamship Company announced their 
new winter schedules to become effective in a 
few days. According to the former company 
the steamer "Northwestern" will be withdrawn 
from service to Southwestern Alaska ports 
pending a thorough overhauling and the steam- 
ers "Alameda," "Alaska" and "Mariposa" will 
alternate on an eight-day schedule to that 
section of Alaska augmented by freighter serv- 
ice when required. The "Dolphin" and "Jeffer- 
son" will continue on the Southeastern Alaska 
run. The Pacific Steamship Company announces 
an increase in its service to California ports by 
one additional sailing weekly and another ever}' 
two weeks. 

The steamer "Adeline Smith," for five years 
the C. A. Smith Company mainstay in lumber 
shipments, has been sold to the Robert Dollar 
Company. The vessel is said to be destined 
for munition carrying across the Pacific Ocean. 
The "Adeline Smith" is an all steel ship and 
has been classed as one of the most efficient 
lumber vessels on this Coast. To provide 
transportation to replace the "Adeline" the 
Smith company will use the "Johanna Smith," 
"C. A. Smith" and a chartered ship. The 
"Johanna" will soon have her machinery in- 
stalled, but the "C. A. Smith," to be launched 
October 2, will be used as a barge for several 
months. The "Adeline" transported more than 
a hundred million feet a year from Coos Bay 
to San Francisco. 

A plea for a comprehensive yet flexible 
scheme for water front improvement for Oak- 
land was made at a mass meeting of the Har- 
bor Protective League at the Oakland Audi- 
torium Theater by Bernard R. Maybeck, who 
said that if such a scheme is made and ad- 
hered to "the improvements will be orderly and 
do the work that must be done. We must 
know beforehand," he said, "what is to follow 



next year and for twenty years to come by 
making ourselves familiar with the influences 
that will affect the needs of the water front. 
The Oakland water front between the Southern 
Pacific mole and the Key Route mole is the 
one and only spot where a beginning can be 
made at the least expense in labor and money 
and in the shortest space of time. To make 
any machine it is necessary first to lay out 
its plan, and when such a plan has been 
worked out the city's development may go 
forward with no fear that in the construction 
of this great traffic machine a monkey-wrench 
has been left in the cogs through oversight." 

With a force that shook Richmond as if by 
an earthquake and was felt in all the bay cities, 
gases in the forward hold of the Standard Oil 
tanker "J. A. Moffett" exploded as the vessel 
lay at her berth at Point Richmond at 3:50 a. 
m. on September 25, tearing to bits two men 
who were working in the hold and wrecking 
the upper deck and a tank of the vessel. The 
dead are: A. R. Juillerat, 30 years old and 
Ernest Rutter, 22 years old. While ofiicials of 
the Standard Oil Company scouted the theory 
that the explosion was not accidental and said 
it was "one of those things that happen in the 
oil business," Federal agents immediately began 
an investigation of the catastrophe. The explo- 
sion on the "Moffett" brought back to the 
memory of old-timers the explosion on the 
steamship "Progreso" at the Fulton Iron 
Works, December 3, 1902, in which eleven men 
were killed and fourteen injured. The cause 
of the explosion was undetermined, although 
the generally accepted theory was that gas in 
the empty oil tanks was ignited by a match 
thrown away by one of the workmen. The 
hulk of the "Progreso" is now being wrecked 
for scrap iron in the Oakland estuary. 

A new era in the development of the re- 
sources of Vancouver Island and other districts 
has been marked by the starting of the Lady- 
smith smeltery belonging to the Ladysmith 
Smelting Corporation, Ltd. The plant is capa- 
ble of handling 1,200 tons of ore per day, iDut 
for the present it is only intended to treat 
about 700 tons daily. This will be provided by 
the Alaska Corporation, which operates in con- 
junction with the Ladysmith concern, although 
the two are separate and distinct corporations. 
The opening of the Ladysmith plant as the new 
smelter will give Vancouver Island a big ad- 
vantage in the way of bringing business to this 
mining center and ultimately create a prestige 
in the industry over other districts. The Granby 
smelter does not treat outside ores, as they 
have enough of their own at their back door 
to keep their plant working to capacity. The 
Ladysmith smelter will treat copper ore prin- 
cipally, and of the initial shipments received at 
the works, much will be brought in from the 
Alaska Corporation's own mines in Northern 
British Columbia and the Yukon Territory. In 
order to keep the plant supplied so that it may 
work at its present full capacity it may be nec- 
essary to bring in ores from Alaska as well. 

The schooner "Else," Captain Zolling, arrived 
at San Francisco during the past week from 
Port Pirie after being compelled to put into 
Wellington, N. Z., on account of his craft 
springing a leak. The "Else" left Port Pirie 
211 days ago and Wellington eight-nine days 
ago, being one of the vessels making long 
voyages on the Pacific. With a cargo of con- 
centrates and hemp the schooner sailed from 
the Australian port February 24. April 8, Cap- 
tain Zolling said, a heavy southeast gale was 
encountered and the ship so badly darnaged he 
had to put into the nearest port, which hap- 
pened to be Wellington. All the cargo was 
discharged, the hull completely recaulked and 
some of the rigging replaced. June 28 the 
schooner sailed from Wellington and came on 
to San Francisco without mishap. The "Else" 
is a new vessel, having been built at Tacoma 
for A. E. Andersen & Co., and turned over for 
her first voyage the first part of the year. After 
discharging she will carry another cargo of 
lumber to New Zealand, as on her maiden 
voyage. Captain Zolling extols her sailing 
qualities. It is the opinion in shipping circles 
that the way the concentrates were loaded in 
the vessel caused her to be especially sensitive 
to the elements. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sut- 
ter 5807. (Advt.) 

"Silas B. Axtell (attorney for Seamen's Unions 
in New York), formerly attorney for The Legal 
Aid Society, announces that he has opened an 
office for the practice of law and for the ex- 
clusive use of seamen. Consultation and advice 
free of charge. Suits under the La Follette Act 
for half wages; actions for damages for injuries 
on account of accident, etc., given prompt atten- 
tion." (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 
FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY.... GUST AVE H. BROWN. Agent 
51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JOHN BERG, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHRODER. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY 12 South Street 

Telephone 2107 Broad 

New York Branch 514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass 6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La 228 Lafayette Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 806 South Broadway 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 206 Moravian Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 231 Dock Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 220 Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass 168 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 54 Commercial Place 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 

Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 47 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, Mich 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

rONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS* UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUT. SCrTARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications ot a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco PostofBce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
50 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOTTRNAT-, provided thev are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not re.sponsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1917. 



THE vSTANDARD OF I.IMXG. 



The ever-rising- cost of living: is bringing 
about an ever-increasing demand from 
various grou])s of organized workers for a 
readjustment of wages. As a natural se- 
(|uence tlic ])ublic is annoyed by more or 
less friction between labor and capital. 
This friction is sometimes erroneously de- 
lined as "unrest." And to "allay'' this un- 
rest certain employers have called to their 
rescue a new variety economist, i. e.. men 
who write long-winded treatises about the 
standard upon which a wage scale should 
be based under given conditions. 

lUit notwithstanding all the labored ar- 
guments of these intellectuals it is hereby 
asserted that there can be only one stand- 
ard u])on which to base a sound wage 
scale. 

The attempt nuist be to arrive at a wage 
which will permit the workman to be ef- 
ficient in every respect. I le must be put in 
a position of healthfulness, comfort and 
reasonable assurance of a continuity of in- 
come. 

It is utterly fallacious to divide the con- 
sideration of a wage scale into two distinct 
parts, one the so-called economic phase, the 
other the .sociologic phase. 

To say that there is an economic maxinnim 
which capital will i)ay to labor, or can pay 
to labor, and that this economic maximum 
may be below the social minimum results in 
a practical absurdity as well as much con- 
fusion of thought and waste of effort. 

The economic maximum theory is based 
upon the fallacious assumpton that invested 
capital is in a position to compel labor to 
accept a wage which is limited by the 
amount of net revenue available after capital 
has received its return. 

This assumes that the primary requisite of 
invested capital is return nr interest and that 
labor comes after lliis return. In truth, labor 
is the first essential to invested capital, i)er- 
haps ranking on a level with commodities 



vital to the continuation of the enterprise, 
but certainly ranking ahead of return or 
interest on invested capital. It requires no 
argument to show that without labor capital 
can earn no return and that capital would 
die were labor withdrawn from it, whereas 
capital does not die if interest is denied it. 
.\n inade(iuate wage results inevitably in 
inefficient labor and inefficient labor results 
inevitably in damage to invested capital ; 
hence the statement is sound that an ade- 
quate wage is an essential to the integrity 
and continued existence of invested capital, 
whereas this is not true of interest or return 
on capital. 

There can be no true distinction made 
between a sound wage scale and a social 
minimum of wages. 

The .social minimum of wages properly 
understood involves the fixing of wages at 
such a point as to enable the recipient to 
efficiently perform his duty as a workman 
and, what is an essential to this efficiency, 
perform his duties and obligations as a 
citizen and a supporting member of a family. 

It follows that the correct procedure in 
fixing a wage scale, particularly with refer- 
ence to a public utility, such as a passenger 
carrying steamship company with regular 
sailing dates, or a street-car line, is to de- 
termine as accurately as may be, the wages 
which under all the circumstances are ade- 
quate to produce and maintain efficient .serv- 
ice on the part of the workman with all that 
is necessary to such efficiency. 

Having fixed this wage, if it be found that 
the rates of the public utility are not suf- 
ficient to permit of the payment of this wage 
scale plus return on investment, application 
should be made to the rate fixing authority 
to increase rates to meet the fair retjuire- 
mcnts of capital and labor. 

If the rate fixing body finds that under all 
the circumstances rates can be fixed which 
will permit the payment of this sound wage 
scale plus a return on capital, the problem 
is solved. On the other hand, if it be found 
that under all the circumstances rates can be 
fixed which will permit the payment of this 
wage scale but no return on investment, then 
return on investment must give way and 
bide a time when changed circumstances will 
permit of its payment. 

If it be found, however, that the highest 
l>ermissible rates considering continued 
patronage of the utility and all other circum- 
stances which go to determine rates, will not 
permit of the continuation of the quantity 
of service given, and the payment of this 
wage scale, then a diminution of service must 
occur down to a point where the payment 
of this wage scale is possible. 

If finally no diminution of service will 
make the payment of this wage scale pos- 
sible, then the utility should cease operations 
or, to use a more popular ])hrase, "go out 
of business," on the ground that its con- 
tinued existence is unwarranted. 



PEACE BASED UPON JUSTICE. 



Conciliation and arbitration are, of course, 
well worth seeking. In the present imper- 
fect state of industrial morals, however, it is 
apparent that the hope of attaining these ends 
lies chiefly in the power of either or both 
parties to fall back upon the sterner alterna- 
tive. 



Nf)thing succeeds like success. The success 
of our efforts depends upon our loyalty to 
ourselves. To consistently patronize Union 
Labeled products is an act of loyalty. 



Whether one is a "pacifist" or a champion 
of the fight-to-the-finish doctrine, all must 
admit that sooner or later peace will be 
made. Let us hope that it will be on terms 
that will ensure permanent peace. lUit there 
is little put forth so far from any official 
source to justify that expectation. Peace 
can not be made permanent without abolition 
of the economic causes of war. So long 
as these causes exist there will be danger of 
war, regardless of the outcome of the pres- 
ent struggle, ^o long as democratic nations 
insist on maintaining an autocratic economic 
system, so long do they make it possible 
for political autocrats to fool their subjects 
into making war. Moreover, an autocratic 
economic .system must breed new political 
autocrats, even though all existing autocrats 
be overthrown in the present war. 

There is no reason why the United States, 
or any other democratic nation, should wait 
for a treaty of peace to abolish the institu- 
tions it maintains which tend to create inter- 
national hatred. A treaty of peace may pro- 
vide for evacuation of all conquered terri- 
tory, independence for all subject peoi)le de- 
siring it, cession of provinces by the gov- 
ernment to which they object to the one they 
prefer, cash indemnities to all who have suf- 
fered from outrage, reduction of armaments 
and even in dethronement of every monarch. 
r>ut future war will still be possible, if not 
probable, should the various nations continue 
to maintain protective tarififs, and allow as 
much of the earth as they control to remain 
the private property of a privileged few. 

The duty of each nation desiring to main- 
tain peace is to establish economic justice 
within its own borders. That done, it need 
not feel concerned over possible hostile feel- 
ings of any foreign potentate. The subjects 
of such a potentate would see in the country 
of economic justice a haven of refuge and 
would turn against their potentate in i)refer- 
ence to making war against it. In time 
they would compel their potentate to adopt 
some more useful occupation. 

As to how economic justice may be estab- 
lished, that has been explained many times 
by economic experts. To mention but one : 
I fenry George in his work "Progress and 
Poverty" showed how it can be done by 
making the land common property, not 
through sudden revocation of titles and gov- 
ernment seizures, but by a change in the tax 
system that would take for public use the 
entire rental value of land in lieu of all 
taxes. When the United States adopts that 
system it will be safe from foreign aggres- 
sion regardless of its state of military pre- 
paredness. L'ntil it does so, it will not be 
.safe, regardless of what other measure of 
defense it may adopt. The same applies 
to every other nation, large or small. 



We have a great deal of sympathy but 
very little respect for the order of intellect 
that can see no diflference between the com- 
pulsion of a court and the compulsion of a 
trade union in the regulation of the cm- 
[)loye's relations with the employer. 



The man who is inclined at times to re- 
gard himself as the "whole cheese" in the 
labor movement may find .something worth 
while in the reflection that after all he is 
merely a mite — a creature born of the move- 
ment's age and strength. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



STEEL TRUST FORCING TROUBLE. 



The arrogant attitude of the steel trust 
heads toward the Lhiited States Government 
and the organized seamen have made a strike 
on the Great Lakes ahnost unavoidable. It 
should be clearly and distinctly understood 
that the seamen on the Great Lakes have 
done everything that could reasonably be ex- 
pf^cted to avoid a tie-up during our coun- 
try's present emergency. But the steel trust 
chiefs, in their dual capacity as labor ex- 
ploiters and war profiteers, will listen neither 
to the patriotic appeals of Government offi- 
cials nor to the respectful requests for rec- 
ognition made by the organized seamen. 

In peace or war the steel trust has as- 
sumed the same defiant attitude. There is 
nothing to arbitrate ; there is nothing to talk 
about, and whoever does not like the steel 
trust's way of ^doing business can lump it. 
Neither Government nor organized labor are 
permitted to stand in the way. Everything 
must give way to the mandates of that greedy 
and unpatriotic aggregation of labor-crushers. 
At least, such is the dictum of Messrs. Gary, 
Schwab and Company. 

The shi])owners along the Atlantic and the 
Pacific coasts gladly responded to the call of 
the U. S. Government to work together with 
the men before the mast in training that 
much-needed personnel for the great new 
American Merchant Marine. 

But the steel trust has absolutely refused to 
co-operate with the organized seamen in bring- 
ing about a solution of the manning problem. 

The seamen on the Great Lakes are prac- 
tically compelled, therefore, to strike from 
purely patriotic motives. Surely, every right- 
thinking American will applaud any effort 
made by the seamen to teach that grasp- 
ing, overbearing corporation a much-needed 
lesson. 

America is still greater than any single 
interest, even though it ])e the mightv steel 
trust. If the seamen of our country have 
been chosen to drive home that lesson they 
certainly are willing and anxious to respond ! 



FREE PORTS AND FREE SEAS. 



DON'T FORGET MOTHER. 



b 



The "Information Wanted" columns of the 
Journal are filled to overflowing with in- 
quiries for missing seamen. Scarcely a day 
passes that we do not receive some pathetic 
message with an urgent appeal to find some 
old mother's missing" boy before it is too 
late. Again, there are received many letters 
the contents of which may be summarized 
as follows : 

"Our mother has died, and we have not 
heard from brother for a long while. Find 
him for us, so that we may tell him that 
mother has passed away. She asked us to 
find him, as she was dying." 

Just a few lines, now and then, would 
have brought comfort to that mother, would 
have caused her to realize that the son who 
had nursed at her breast had not forgotten 
her. In the absence of those few lines her 
last days and the closing hour were filled 
with grief because her boy, her absent boy, 
did not think enough of her to write from 
time to time. To the absent boy who neg- 
lects to write to mother, the following lines 
by J. B. Griffith should appeal: 

If you have a ^ray-haired mother 

In the old home far away, 
Sit you down and write tlie letter 

^'ou put off from day to day. 
Don't wait until her weary steps 

Reach heaven'.s pearly j^ate, 
Rut' show her that you think of her 

Before it is too late. 



Free Land Routes and Free Access to the 

Shores Are Essentials to International 

Good Will and Peace. 



Much is made of the plea for freedom of the 
seas, but less is heard of freedom of ports. 
Yet it is the latter rather than the former that 
will be instrumental in establishing a perma- 
nent peace basis. Freedom of the seas we have 
long had in times of peace, but that freedom 
has been bounded by the shores of the sea. 
Though goods might be sent to the ends of 
the earth without let or hindrance upon the 
high seas, no sooner did they reach land than 
they met with all manner of obstacles to fur- 
ther progress. These obstacles were in the 
main self-imposed, but not a few were created 
by others. Nations having direct access to the 
sea under favorable conditions had only the 
shortsightedness of their own statesmen to 
tiiank for whatever hindrances were placed in 
the way of trade; but those countries lying in- 
land, or such as had harbors less convenient 
than those of their neighbors were at a dis- 
advantage, not through lack of freedom of the 
seas, but because of trade restrictions of neigh- 
boring countries. 

It would be asking too much that the states- 
men who draw the peace agreement should stip- 
ulate for international free trade. That is still 
in the future. It is likely to come only with 
the slower means of evolution. Though all pub- 
licists and statesmen are convinced that free 
trade within a country, among its States or 
provinces is the only rational system of econ- 
omy, few have yet been able to grasp the idea 
that international free trade is the same as na- 
tional free trade, except that it is better because 
rgreater. But there will be no excuse for ignor- 
ing at this time the necessity of free ports and 
international trade routes on land. No adjust- 
ment of boundaries, by whomsoever drawn, can 
satisfy all the conflicting interests th;'t are seek- 
ing expression. Neither natural botmdaries nor 
arbitrary adjustments can meet the ambitions 
of races and nationalities. But such rearrange- 
ments as are made will be far more satisfactory 
if each and every one is given free access to 
the sea. 

And it is not unreasonaI)le to expect that 
this very important step will be taken. Nu- 
merous have been the .proposals looking to such 
an end, and many are the advocates. The de- 
tails do not so much matter so long as the 
principle is applied. Fortunately there are prec- 
edents to reassure the timid. Antwerp has 
long sent its conunerce unhindered down the 
Scheldt through Dutch territory, and Austro- 
Ilungary has been as free to use the Danube 
ruiining through Roumanian territory. But why 
limit such rights to rivers? Does not the prin- 
ciple apply as well to canals and to railroads? 
And if inland cities have the privilege of send- 
ing goods in bond across foreign territory, with 
tarifif duties payable only in the country of des- 
tination, it will matter little whether the port 
through which they reach the sea belongs to 
the same country or to another. 

A league of nations acting through an inter- 
national commission would find little difficulty 
in setting up such trade arrangements, or of 
maintaining equital)lc relations between national 
and international conmicrce. Yet even so slight 
an advance as this toward free trade would pro- 
duce incalculable benefits, not alone in freeing 
commerce from needless restrictions, but in dis- 
abusing people's minds of foolish prejudice. 
Were Illinois or West Virginia dependent upon 
the caprice of surrounding States to reach the 
sea, interstate wars would have occurred as 
often as preparations could be made. But even 
if the States had continued their tariffs, after 
the manner of the Thirteen Colonies before the 
formation of the Union, freedom to ship across 
the surrounding States to the sea would have 
been a pronounced step toward the national 
free trade they now enjoy. The smaller coun- 
tries of Europe are not unlike our States, with 
populations little less mixed. Give them the 
same freedom in trade and the tendency will be 
toward similar toleration. The process would 
be more rapid if all restrictions were removed; 
hut a long advance will be made by institutin.g 
free land routes in connection with the free- 
dom of the seas. — The Public, New York, N. Y. 



A step in tlic direction of facilitating the 
transaction of marine insurance business in New 
York has been taken by a group of marine in- 
surance underwriters, agents and brokers, in the 
formation of the Marine Insurance Exchange. 
Hereafter marine insurance business will be 
conducted in New York on a plan similar to 
the methods employed by Lloyd's in London. 
An article in the New York Marine News says 
the undertaking is intended to imijrove the con- 
duct of marine insurance in the United Stales 
through the introduction of econoniies of time 
and co-operation between the various factors 
of the business. 

Max I'ochlman, who has been conducl in.y ex- 
periments for the Midnight Suti h'ish Products 
(x)mpany at Seward, Alaska, tanning shark hide 
leather and trying out shark oil, has secured 
sufficient of the former to make a shipment to 
a tannery for a thorough test. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 1, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 p. 
m., F. Johnson presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping good. Nominated delegates to the 
'L'vventy-first Annual Convention of the Inter- 
national Seainen's Union of America. Full Ship- 
wreck Benefit was awarded to two mcndjers of 
crew of the ship "Standard." 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



St. 



Victoria, 1!. C, Sept. 24, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

WILLIAM HASTINGS. Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 24, 1917. 
No meetin.g. Shipping good. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Taconia Agency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON. Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Alain 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
Shipping good; prospects fair. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
No meetin.g. Shipping and prospects fair. 
JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San_ Pedro Agency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
Shipping medium. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128'/^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 17, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 27, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Ed. .\ndersen in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shippin.g fair and men are get- 
ting more plentiful. The report of the Quar- 
terly Finance Committee was read and adopted. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, .Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



.Seattle Agency, Sept. 20, 1917. 
No meetin.g. Sliipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 18, 1917. 
Shipping very dull. Most of the lumber ves- 
sels are running to San Diego. Prospects not 
very good. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., 128^ 6th St. Phone Home 
115, Sunset 335. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
Siiiiiping fair. No members ashore. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



DIED. 

h'rncst Constantine Hansen Renter, No. 710, 
a native of Sweden, age 36. was killed on board 
tin- steamer "J. A. Moffatt," at Point Richmond, 
Cat, Sept. 25, 1917. 



11. lirown & Co., Victoria. 1'. C announce 
tiie sale of their auxiliary schooner "Malahat." 
iust launched from the yards of the ("anii'o- 
iJenoa Mills, 1o the Canada Steamshi)) Lines. 
The ".Malaliat" niav be taken to ihe .\llantic 
coast. .She is of the same type as the motor 
schooners already launched for the II. W. Brown 
Company. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



Once more the steel mill slaves in the 
Pittsburgh district are in revolt. 

They have in past years fought again and 
again, and have been beaten back to the 
mills, and to work the twelve-hour shift 
seven days in every week throughout the 
year. 

A telegram from Organizer .\ndrew T. 
McNamara of the International Association 
of ATachinists to President Johnston of that 
organization, to-day, sums up the facts thus 
far: 

"Jones & Laughlin Co. discharged 1.^0 
men on Friday, the 14th. The men started 
striking the plants, and by the 15th had the 
Soho and Second avenue plants completely 
shut down. This includes eight blast fur- 
naces and 100 coke ovens, affecting 5000 
men. 

"Mass meetings are being held in the 
south side of the city this evening, and the 
men are expected to strike that plant, in- 
cluding bar, rod and plate mills, affecting 
10,000 men. The movement is extending to 
the Woodlawn and Aliquippa plants. 

"Organizers are working on the United 
States Steel Company plants, and by Tues- 
day or Wednesday expect to see 100,000 
workers on strike. So far no disorder has 
occurred. The men are calm, but are de- 
termined that Jones & Laughlin and the 
United States Steel Company shall have to 
do away with the twelve-hour seven-day 
system. 

"Tell the American Federation of Labor 
that every available organizer is needed." 

It has been some ten years since the 
expose of the terrible physical and social 
degradation resulting from the twelve-hour 
day and seven-day week in the steel mills 
at Pittsburgh was published, and the pity 
of a great number of the small stockholders 
of the LTnited States Steel Corporation was 
stirred by the revelation. They attempted 
to organize enough of the stock into an 
"opposition" to compel the board of di- 
rectors to abolish the twelve-hcftir day. 
Their attempt failed. Later attempts also 
failed. All the editorial protests that flooded 
the offices of the trust went for nothing 
The notion that the owners of a business 
will of their own accord reduce their divi- 
dends at the dictation of conscience was 
pretty well discredited. 

The United States Department of Labor 
has made investigations into the steel in- 
dustry, and has done its best to civilize the 
mill management by the indirect influence 
of reports and appeals to their better 
nature. The twelve-hour day was not 
abolished. 

War came, and with it the demand for 
the fixing of prices upon all raw materials 
for manufacture. Lumber, steel, copper— 
these and many other materials were to 
have their cost determined, and prices at 
wholesale and retail fixed accordingly. 
Some of the more optimistic people who 
wanted the twelve-hour day driven out of 
the industry began to predict that when 
steel prices were fixed they would be set 
in accordance with a calculation of cost on 
an eight-hour basis, and that President 
Wilson would somehow bring pressure tn 
bear for this reform, by threatening to 
lower the price of steel if the old condi- 
tions remained. Piut that hope, too, has 
still to be realized. 

Now come the men themselves, to try 



to make Pittsburgh a free community. The 
last big strike in Pittsburgh — at the West- 
inghouse plants — was suppressed by clubs 
and guns after a few days of apparently 
unanimous enthusiasm for the walkout. 
This new uprising may sweep the city, or 
it may possibly be suppressed. The Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor has sent or- 
ganizers to assist those already at work, 
and its whole weight is being thrown into 
the scale to prove that when a body of 
men in industry has determined to be free, 
no power on earth can keep them in sub- 
jection. If, in spite of its efforts, the strike 
is lost, the failure will be only a breathing 
period, during which the men in the steel 
industry will get ready for a far bigger 

fight next year. 

* * * 

After two weeks of fruitless negotiations 
here, the three representatives of the ship- 
yard workers on Puget Sound and in the 
Portland region on the Pacific coast are 
leaving Washington for home, armed with 
full power to call a strike of 50,000 men in 
the yards of the far northwest. That the 
strike will be called if the employers still 
refuse their wage demands is almost 
certain. 

Their failure to get a settlement here 
is due to the action of Chairman Hurley 
of the United States Shipping Board, who 
made a "scrap of paper" of the labor treaty 
signed last month by the heads of all of 
the international unions in the shipyard 
trades, as well as representatives of the 
Shipping Board, the Navy Department, the 
Secretary of Labor and others. Hurley 
waited until the Pacific coast shipyards 
dispute was being considered by the indus- 
trial adjustment board created by this 
labor treaty, and then suddenly decided to 
settle the dispute himself. He notified the 
labor spokesmen that he would see that 
their demands were substantially granted, 
according to the account given here, and 
at almost the same moment the San Fran- 
cisco strike, which had not j'et been fore- 
stalled by any hearings on the part of the 
adjustment commission, convinced Hurley 
that the adjusters could accomplish noth- 
ing anyhow. Chairman V. Everit Macy of 
the adjustment commission disappeared 
from the scene of the desperate debates 
that waged in Shipping Board headquar- 
ters as to how to settle the San Francisco 
trouble. Mr. Carey of Chicago, member 
of the adjustment board on behalf of the 
employers, resigned and went home. Alfred 
J. Berres, secretary of the Metal Trades 
department of the American Federation of 
Labor, who was the labor member of the 
board, tried in vain to save some frag- 
ments of the authority of the board. Hur- 
ley and Admiral Capps — general manager 
of the Emergency Fleet Corporation — took 
exclusive charge of labor troubles in the 
shipyards. 

But Hurley found himself unable to set- 
tle the dispute over the proposed wage in- 
crease. The Government was not prepared 
to pay all of the increase, and the ship- 
yard owners refused to pay their share. 
He appealed to Secretary of Labor Wilson, 
who had been active in creating the adjust- 
ment board which Hurley had just knocked 
into a cocked hat. To-day they are still 
at it. 

Hurley now says that the Government 
must ])revent future difficulties of this sort 
by refusing to let contracts for ships 
where there are not sufficient men in the 



district to build them. He will not have 
one company running up the price of labor 
over another company, by competitive 
bidding for men. Despite the dictum of 
the Clayton Act, that "the labor of a hu- 
man being is not a commodity," the chair- 
man of the Shipping Board wants it to 
stay at a price which he considers reason- 
able, and he will take steps to see that 
the price is not set by competitive bids. 

.\fter a month's delay, and two and a 
half months since the Bisbee kidnaping 
and deportations, the President's decision 
to send a commission to investigate the 
causes of the growth of I. W. W. activity 
and the serious loss of power by the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor in the metal 
mining industry of the Rocky Mountain 
and Pacific Coast States is to be carried 
out. Secretary of Labor Wilson will head 
the commission, on which the labor represent- 
atives will be W. P. Marsh, president of the 
Washington State Federation of Labor, 
and John Walker, president of the Illinois 
State Federation of Labor. Colonel J. L. 
Spanglcr, a Pennsylvania coal operator, 
and Verncr Z. Reed of Colorado will rep- 
resent the employers' interest. Felix 
Frankfurter, the attorney who successfully 
pleaded the case of the Oregon ten-hour 
law for men, before the Ignited States 
Supreme Court last winter, will be secre- 
tary of the commission. 

They will visit Arizona, Montana, Wash- 
ington and L'tah longer than the other 
States in which the I. W. W. has been 
active this year. They will question the 
employers as to why they have driven out 
all union men, in the deportations, instead 
of merely the I. W. W. members. They 
will probe the charges made by a few 
unionists that I. W. W. organizers have 
had the active support of the bosses. They 
will finally try to reach agreement on 
some plan, to be recommended to the 
President and to the employers and work- 
ers, whereby industrial peace may be as- 
sured during the war period. 

To put the case bluntly— this is an of- 
ficial attempt to get the employers and 
workers in the mining, lumbering and oth- 
er industries to see that American Federa- 
tion of Labor unionism is better than I. 
W. W. agitation. 

Its success will depend on tlic emi>loyers, 
of course, since it is a purely advisory 
body. It will not recommend Government 
operation of the industries in any event. 



For many years the Portuguese, through 
their rulership of Macao, held control of the 
foreign trade of China, for this was the only 
safe, friendly port where foreign ships could 
anchor. Here the merchantmen of the 
Honorable East India Company, the tea 
clipper ships from Boston and Salem, and 
the Dutch ships on their way to Na.gasaki 
stopped for supplies, repairs, and the news 
of the world. St. Francis Xavier lived here 
and from here made his ineffectual efforts 
to reach the mainland of China. He is 
buried on a nearby island. Here the first 
treaty between the United States and 
China was signed and here American diplo- 
matic officials lived before they were al- 
lowed on Chinese soil. It was here that 
the first Chinese firecrackers were pur- 
chased by .American skippers, and brought 
home to start a custom which has en- 
livened and endangered a century of 
Fourths of July. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MUZZLING THE TRUTH. 



And now they are after Scott Nearing. 
At Toledo, Ohio, the federal authorities 
raided his home in search of literature, 
they said, used in opposition of the con- 
scription law. No arrests were made. 
Professor Nearing, until he was dropped 
by the faculty a few months ago, held 
the chair of arts and sciences at Toledo 
University and was universally popular 
until he began to "utter unpatriotic re- 
marks." 

His alleged "unpatriotic remarks," if one 
reads his writings correctly, consisted 
mostly of protest against the industrial 
system as it thrives today in this "land 
of democracy." Professor Nearing, like 
the average professor, until he began to 
see the light, delivered the usual stereo- 
typed lectures, and all went well with 
him. But he began to see his words were 
not the true expression of his real feel- 
ings, and so he began to change. 

He saw the world in a new light, viewed 
for the first time its misery and suffering. 
He saw the hypocrisy and deceit. He saw, 
too, people living in luxury while others 
lived in poverty and distress, a picture 
of a hideous existence, and understood 
that life was different than he had any 
knowledge of although he was a learned 
man. Then he began to protest against 
all this inequality and injustice. He de- 
nounced Billy Sunday and his ilk. He 
attacked the men who were responsible 
for wage slavery and those robber barons 
who waxed fat through gouging the com- 
mon folk for the necessities of life. 

Then the faculty, prodded by these peo- 
ple under attack, began to see in Profes- 
sor Nearing's utterances "unpatriotic re- 
marks" and so he was dismissed, cast 
aside like many another man who had 
been true to his convictions no matter 
what the consequences. Since his dismis- 
sal he has been giving his time exclusively 
to lecturing and writing and many splen- 
did articles concerning Industrial life have 
been given to the labor press and widely 
read. 

And now that he cannot be dismissed 
from some college, they are going to see 
to it that his writings are suppressed, 
that his power throughout the land be 
not felt. But Professor Nearing is one 
who is not easily cowed and he unques- 
tionably will go on spreading his gospel, 
if he can stand the expense, giving the 
people a true insight into conditions ex- 
isting in this country that the monied 
interests know cannot stand the light. 

The labor movement should aid Profes- 
sor Nearing in his work. Let us send him 
letters of commendation and encourage- 
ment and if he will permit we should as- 
sist him in a financial way so his work 
can be carried on. He is badly needed, 
especially at this time when the question 
of "autocracy or democracy" is being set- 
tled. — Spokane Labor World. 



GOING THE LIMIT. 

(By Scott Nearing.) 



A free Government witli an uncontrolled 
power of military conscription is a solecism 
at once the most ridiculous and abominable 
that ever entered into the head of man. — 
Danel Webster. 



The business world is using the war de- 
mand to go the limit. In every direction 
profits are soaring as prices rise. Patriotism 
is no bar. The wealth owners of the coun- 
try display the most sordid indifference to 
anything that interferes with a good return 
on the investment. 

So critical is the situation that one Wall 
Street paper protests in a recent issue, that 
the business men are going too far. 

"The price of steel products continues to 
advance. Billets rose another $5 a ton last 
week. The average price of eight steel 
products now stands at $99.29 as compared 
with $58.99 the same time last year and 
$32.83 the corresponding week in 1915. 
Pig iron at last has gone beyond the $50 
level. This, too, in spite of a production 
of 3,417,340 tons in May, with one ex- 
ception the largest monthly production on 
record ! The furnaces have had difficulty 
in obtaining coke or the production of pig 
iron undoubtedly would have broken all 
records. 

"Still it is difiicult to justify the in- 
crease in price. The cost of production 
surely does not warrant it. 

"The prediction is made now that prices 
may soar to almost any limits. They have 
been rising in the last month with a rapid- 
ity that is simply frightening. There is no 
reason when the country is at war and the 
demand for steel greater than ever before, 
why the Government and private consumers 
should pay prices 100 or 200 per cent, in 
excess of the cost of producing iron and 
steel. Charging 'what the traffic will bear' 
might have had some justification before we 
were at war. Now it is utterly indefensi- 
ble. If steel prices are going higher simply 
because the mills are able to put them 
higher it is time the Government set a 
maximum price tor steel. After all, the 
country at large is the sufferer from this 
sort of extortion, be it directed at the 
Government or private consumer. And 
both are the victims." 

The protest is not very vigorous — not 
nearly as vigorous as it might be made, but 
it shows that even the wiser heads among 
the business men are beginning to cry 
"Stop thief!" lest they kill the goose that is 
laying the golden eggs. 

The soldiers at the front hear the com- 
mand from their country, "Fight!" The 
people who stay at home and the Govern- 
ment that is directing the war, hear from 
the vested interests of the United States, 
the command, "Pay!"— and they both pay. 



Notice to Seamen 



IMPORTANT. 



The agitation against child labor is simply 
a movement to re-establish the natural order 
in family affairs. 



We cannot, says the Tobacco Workers' 
Journal, afford to let our efforts flag and be 
slackers on the job of organization at any 
time, but now, especially, with the cost of 
living soaring and the "dollar" or its pur- 
chasing power decreasing in value more and 
more as the war progresses. Our wages 
can only be kept in measure with the ad- 
vancing costs through organization, more 
organization, and still more organization. 
Our employers arc boosting the products 
of labor, which they control, and they do 
it through organization, which they are 
maintaining, as they know that their safety 
lies in organization. What is good for 
them in that direction must also be good 
for us. Labor would bo in .1 stronger posi- 
tion if it gave more thought efificiency in 
its own protection. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in . 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain, 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



As soon as I liear from my friend here for 
a moment, 1 am going to ask the inspector 
general of the Steamboat Inspection Service to 
come forward and state what his experience 
with the Department has been, and what the 
facts are as he sees them. When he has 
spoken I am going then to ask the Commis- 
sioner of Lighthouses to give you his ex- 
perience in service on a fleet of some forty- 
odd seagoing steamers, what his actual ex- 
periences have been, the actual facts of record, 
if I may have that privilege. 

Mr. Brown: Mr. Cliairman, I want to ofler 
this and have it entered into the record. 
(Reading): "At any time it may be proven, 
to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Com- 
merce, that there exists a need to issue marine 
engineer's licenses to persons other than those 
who have served their full apprenticeship, as 
now required by law, the local inspectors of 
the U. S. Steamboat Inspection Service shall 
grant a 'special' license to act as second and 
third assistant engineer on ocean steam ves- 
sels, to any person making application for 
same. Such application to bear the endorse- 
ment of three regularly licensed marine en- 
gineers with whom the applicant has served as 
an oiler, water tender, or fireman, on a steam 
vessel. 

"F.niiinecrs who have served one year under 
such license, shall be eligible for an examina- 
tion for a regular license of the same, or next 
higher grade. 

"In the event of the adoption of such plan 
by the Department of Commerce, to meet any 
present or future emergency requirement for 
engineers, the Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of the United States of America 
herein pledges its best efforts to assist the 
United States Government in making the 
same cflFcctive:' " Wm. S. Brown, Nat'l Presi- 
dent, M. E. B. A." 

Secretary Rcdfield: If you will send that 
to me I will say to the Board of Supervising 
Inspectors, that I shall be pleased to have it 
given their earnest consideration. 

General Uhlcr, will you step forward? 

Statement by Mr. Geo. C. Uhler. 

General Uhler: Mr. Chairman and Gentle- 
men, the question of the concern that is being 
felt and expressed as to the apparent shortage 
of licensed officers have had a great deal of 
consideration upon the part of myself and 
yourself, if you please, and upon that of the 
Department in its various bureaus generally. 
Jt might be well to speak of the necessary 
modifications in the rules and regulations ad- 
mitting candidates to examination and the 
necessity for those modifications. I will speak 
first, Mr. Chairman, of the reduction of the 
age limit. While there were never any statutes 
or any law bearing upon the necessity of an 
applicant being twenty-one years of age, it 
had always been held by the Secretary of the 
Department under whose jurisdiction steam- 
boat inspection service was at that time that 
while the law did not require a man to be 
twenty-one years of a^e, safety of the public 
and the general administration of the steam- 
boat inspection laws required and demanded 
that a man should be at least of that age 
when he could be made answerable for his 
acts and where the courts might have juris- 
diction. That was continued for many years, 
until three years ago, I think. After the per- 
sistent requests and the demands of the admin- 
istrators of the executives of the State Nauti- 
cal Schools, that their men, having served their 
term, which was two years, might be ad- 
mitted to the examination at the termination 
of their school term and not have to go to 
sea for another twelve months or another two 
or three years, perhaps, before they got a li- 
cense. The comparisons were made with all 
of the other countries — Great Britain and 
France and Germany — all the maritime na- 
tions, that they admitted young men to ex- 
amination for license at eighteen years of age 
or less. But it was not until the Board of 
Supervising Inspectors became thoroughly con- 
vinced and unanimously of the opinion, if you 
please, that the age limit should be reduced 
and that men of nineteen years of age should 
be admitted to examination. That was not 
because of the apparent emergency, but be- 
cause of the fact doing justice to these young 
men who had served their school term in the 
school ships, and who had been under the care 
of their various States, and who really were 
qualified and eligible for a license. 

A modification of the thirty-six months' 
service on the Lakes — or at least three years, 
which meant thirty-six months — was made ap- 
parent to the Board of Supervising Inspectors 
that that would mean in many instances more 
than four seasons of navigation. And I think 
it was ratlier a harmonious adjustment when 
we got together, and while there was con- 
siderable vigorous protest on the part of some 
of those that were interested I think that it 
was an amicable adjustment that was to be 
tried at least to find out whether or not it 
would work without causing detriment. 

After the declaration of war, or before the 



declaration in fact, and after the organization 
of the Shipping Board and the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation, and when it was proposed 
to go into the construction and operation of 
ships as a necessity on the part of the Gov- 
ernment, immediately concern began to be 
expressed as to whore we would get officers 
for these ships, not officers alone but seamen 
and other men to man and to officer them. 
F'or myself, I felt but little concerned. 1 
knew that there were a large corps of men, 
particularly in that end of the ship of which 
1 had perhaps a better knowledge than the 
C'lhcr, where there were thousands of them 
liolding United States licenses who were em- 
ployed in the larger industries and the power 
plants, and so forth, of the country, who 
could be called on at a minute's notice, al- 
most, and I felt sure that their patriotism 
would be no less than that of ours, and that 
the response would be just as generous as it 
would be from anybody of twenty years of 
age. I gave that but little concern. 

As to the deck officers, there was absolutely, 
from what I could see, no dearth of officers in 
the grades or in the rank of master or chief 
mate, but the shortage that was being shown 
was in the second and first mates; and I 
think possibly from the fact that they had 
other employment that was more congenial 
and that was more attractive and where they 
could get more money. I had occasion to 
explain the matter to the Secretary, and I 
think that a repetition of a part of that ex- 
planation would not be out of place. Mr. 
Secretary, that those who were supposed to 
know and who had in their minds and in 
their hearts, more of this Government's secrets 
than I or the Board had, made plain that in 
their estimation and in their judgment the 
shortage did exist. We did not know how 
many ships they were going to build; we did 
not know whether they would build ten or a 
thousand; we did not know whether they 
would be ships that required three or six 
engineers, or three or six deck officers. But 
it was made plain to us and so plain that it 
was quite satisfactory to the Board of Super- 
vising Inspectors that it was necessary that 
these qualifications be modified so as to admit 
a man who was reasonably qualified for li- 
cense to examination. And right there, Mr. 
Secretary, 1 would like to correct a misap- 
prehension on the part of Mr. Gibson, whoso 
remarks were to lead one to believe that 
young men or the older men, if you please, 
are to be admitted to these examinations with- 
out any experience whatever. That is not 
right. The first thing that a young man does, 
when he makes an application for entry into 
one of the schools, is to go before the board 
of local inspectors, and ascertain whether or 
not his experience will justify his entry into 
that school, and if his experience under the 
modified rule, does not justify it he is not 
taken. So that every man who makes applica- 
tion for entry into one of these schools must 
prove that he has the qualifications necessary 
under the modified regulations or he cannot 
enter. So that he nmst have had at least a 
reasonable amount of experience to justify his 
examination. 

In the higher grades of officers, there has 
not been a great deal of modification, Mr. 
Chairman, but the modifications have been 
largely in the lower grades, so that they might 
qualify for the lower grades, and still main- 
tain the upper grades in practically their old 
standard, and tliat we might use the lower 
grades as students for the upper grades and 
to take their places after they had been ex- 
perienced in the lower grades. 

It may have been necessary; it may not. 
But the Board of Supervising Instructors and 
the Executive Committee felt that those who 
had expressed this concern about the shortage 
of officers, knew more about it than we did 
and it was up to us to meet what thcj' con- 
sidered to be an emergency. And the matter 
which gave them concern must certainly have 
our consideration. Mr. Secretary, I have 

nothing to say about the necessity nor the 
facts that led up to the issuance of the Exec- 
utive Order. I am very, very glad to have 
heard it discussed here to-day in the moderate, 
conservative, genial manner in which it has 
been. There are those here to-day who feel 
very strongly upon it, and I know that their 
expressions have been very moderate and very 
conservative. I am very glad to have the 
expression of patriotism that I have heard 
from Mr. Gibson. I am getting a little bit 
old myself. I have been at sea, Mr. .Secretary, 
for the L^nited States Government forty-four 
years, and if there is anything that they have 
got afloat to-day that needs an engineer, I 
will tackle her and go with Gibson. (Ap- 
plause.) And you can rest assured that when 
I come back again to take my job, Mr. Secre- 
tary, I have done him credit, I hope. 

Mr. Chairman, apparent emergencies may 
become crises, and a country and a government 
and an administration without any anticipation 
whatever is on a bad tack, for sooner or later 
they arc going to get caught full and back. 
I believe in anticipation; or I believe in not 
waiting until the emergency appears. If it is 
not here, and if the emergency and the crises 
do not come to pass, that executive order and 
all this work can be reversed just as quickly 



as executed, and when necessity comes for 
that, I believe that it will be done. 

There are enough of these gentlemen here 
to-day. Mr. Secretary, with whom I have been 
associated for nearly thirty years of my life, 
who believe that my opinions, if not always 
right, are sincere. I want to say to them, and 
I want to say to everybody else and to you, 
sir, that I do not believe we have gone very 
far wrong. If we have, and it is proven that 
we have been premature or that the crisis does 
not exist or will not appear, we can change 
it and these things can be restored to their 
old form just as quickly as we put them for- 
ward. 

I have nothing more to say. Mr. Secretary. 
I thank you very much. (Applause.) 

Address by Secretary Redfield. 

Secretary Redfield: Gentlemen of the con- 
ference, I think I may add a few words to 
\yhat General Uhler has said, which may re- 
lieve the minds of some of you and perhaps 
eliminate from the conference this question of 
officers. 

It is the belief of the Department of Com- 
merce, it is our conviction now that there is 
at present no shortage of officers necessary for 
the vessels that are coming along. We think 
they can be provided. But I want to put the 
situation as fairly to your thoughtful and quiet 
minds to see it as it is. The one most serious 
factor that this country faces is that of mer- 
chant ships. There are other serious factors, 
but that is the most serious factor. Every 
call to duty comes most loudly to him who 
can rnove a ship quickly. The man who delays 
a ship over a day for any cause whatever, 
howsoever personal or intimate to himself, 
does wrong to his country now. It is alto- 
gether within reason to say that a single day's 
delay in this war, that which causes it to last 
a day longer than it otherwise would, may 
readilv mean to his country .SOO of her sons, 
and $15,000,000 of her money wasted. You 
will not be figuring far wrong, if that is taken 
for a working basis, as it some day will be. 
I think. As regards Great Britain and France, 
that will be far within the fact. It is my duty, 
it is your duty, it is the duty of every Ameri- 
can to sec afar, to see in advance; not when 
the time comes, but before it happens, that 
every possible cause of delay, certain or un- 
certain, proper or improper, is taken out of 
the possibility in advance. It is my duty not 
to have there be the slightest doubt in the 
world that I can remove whether there are 
officers enough not to be had in a day or two, 
not to be had in a week or two, but to be had 
in an hour; for the difTerence between two 
o'clock and five o'clock of the going of a 
vessel may well mean her safe voyage or her 
destruction. These things are not the things 
of the past, but the things of the nrescnt and 
the future, and they are wholly different from 
anvthing you and I have had to deal with 
before. It may be then, that would remove all 
possibility of a shortage of oflficers, if it be 
the calling of the officers from perhaps their 
more pleasant and more remunerative employ- 
ment; if it be opening the door more widely to 
the oilers and the watertenders of a home Mr. 
Gibson has so truly spoken; if it be the open- 
ing which was suggested b)' us of the bridges 
of our ships to men who have servied with 
our Allied nations in the foreign trade; what- 
ever it might be which would insure it beyond 
all doubt and cavil that if there came thirty 
ships at once into being in a week they should 
not be delayed over Saturday night for lack 
of a man, that whatever was necessary for 
them has to be done — I think, has been done. 
(.Applause.) 

There is the whole motive revealed, plain as 
the day. Mv good friend Gibson, let him bo 
the best engineer in the world, but if I wanted 
a ship to leave New York this afternoon, he 
must not delay her by coming in the morning. 
We must have a man ready to go and not 
have that ship delayed over night. The thing 
is too serious. It is not what we have been 
doing before. We must be ready; the man 
must be there, not to be there in the coming 
(lavs. That is the emergency we face. 

W'c want the preference given to the Amer- 
ican boys; we want the preference given to 
the American officer. We have no thought of 
anything else. That is our whole part and 
purpose, but there must be no uncertainty, and 
T do not want American boys killed in France 
because I had to wait twenty-four hours for an 
.American captain who was a hundred miles 
away when I had an Englishman on the dock. 
That is my attitude. (Applause.) That has 
got to be our attitude, gentlemen. Service to- 
gether. I am afraid you men do not realize 
the awful strain this nation is going to be 
under. We nuist not let any personal wishes, 
preferences, convictions, habits, and enthusiasm 
as to our own way — we must go ahead with- 
out a stop. But in the broadest way, I 
pledge to you my word that every preference 
will be given, ought to be given, must be 
given, to the American boy. 

Now, then, what I understand this confer- 
ence to be for is this: To put the sailor in 
the same position of reasonable certitude for 
tiic future that the officer is. If we can have 
Iwonty-five shios emerging in a week, big 
fellows, let us hope more than that in a week 
ready to go, must we keep them overnight 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



I 



for lack of boys to man them? We ought not, 
if they are so kept overnight when otherwise 
they could go, American boys yonder will die. 
This is not a question of conviction; it is a 
question of life and death. That is what I 
hope' you get out of this conference, the get- 
ting of the spirit that nothing happens of any 
importance whatever if it so be the flag is 
upheld; but there is no cause so great as the 
cause of the flag; but we must get together to 
advance that and that only, and when the 
time shall come that the flag waves in honor 
and victory then let us discuss with entire 
frankness the differences, and I believe in the 
common fire of patriotism these little things 
will all be Inirncd up. (Applause.) 

Mr. Putnam, will you state your experience 
with crews, please? 

Statement by Mr. Putnam. 

Mr. Putnam: The Secretary has asked nie 
to speak briefly of the application of this 
problem to one of the maritime services of the 
Department of Commerce, that is, the Light- 
house Service. 

The Lighthouse Service is a service main- 
tained for the benefit of shipping and of 
direct interest to every one of you here. It 
is of interest to the ship owner, the engineer 
on a ship that the Lighthouse Service should 
be efificiently maintained. The safety of their 
vessels and their lives depend on that. At 
the present time this service is called on for 
more even ihan that because it is cooperating 
with the Navy Department. The tenders of 
the service are under the orders of the Naval 
Commandant to assist the Navy also; at the 
same time they are doing their lighthouse 
work. 

The principal disability in operating this 
service in the last two years has been in keep- 
ing the vessels properly manned. 

The service has between forty and fifty 
lighthouse tenders and between fifty and sixty 
light vessels, and these 120 vessels require 
about 1600 officers and men. 

I am going to read a few extracts from re- 
ports received from masters of vessels as the 
best way of setting the case before you, as to 
the difficulty of keeping the vessels manned. 

For instance, the report from Cape Lookout 
Shoal light ship, which is one of the most 
dangerous and exposed stations on the coast, 
stated: 

"Of six seamen on board only two were 
able to steer and know starboard from port." 

There is another case from the lighthouse 
inspector at San Francisco, Cal.: 

"Six landsmen employed as deck hands Ma- 
drono. Impossible secure certified seamen or 
boatmen; not safe operate vessel outside." 

There is a letter from the master of the 
lighthouse tender Amaranth employed on the 
Great Lakes: 

"During the month of August, IF! men were 
hired and quit. Without losing sight of the 
fact that all of them were entirely incompe- 
tent, the would be seaman can't skull, row 
nor use an oar in any way, shape or form, and 
if we are called upon to go to the help of 
someone in distress we would run a great risk 
to lose our own men and property in making an 
attempt at rescue." 

There is a report from the master of Dia- 
mond Shoal light vessel, which occupies 
prr)bably the most dangerous station of any 
light vessel in the world: 

"We are at present shorthandcd and have 
been for sometime. 

"You got to make them to stay and trv to 
get along and do the work yourself. I have 
just now only three men aboard." 

The regular crew is six seamen. 

The master of the tender Crocus of Lake 
Erie says: 

"The changes in this part of the crew (18 
men) during the last four months have aver- 
aged 18 per month." 

"The men who thus temporarily accepted 
the employment oflfcred have been of the poor- 
est and v\-ould not be accepted elsewhere. 

"It has always ben found impossible to 
obtain a man to permanently fill the position 
of second officer." 

The master of the tender Maple reports: 

"It has been impracticable to secure experi- 
enced firemen. In order to keep the vessel 
going we have been compelled to take inex- 
perienced boys who know practically nothing 
about the work they are to perform. The 
presence of such inexperienced help in the 
fire-room is really dangerous, since it im- 
perils the lives of the persons on board, to 
say nothing of the damage that might be done 
the vessel." 

To meet these conditions, the Lighthouse 
Service has, so far as the anpropriations of 
Congress would permit, made increases in pay 
from time to time. Being bound by the laws, 
and the appropriations of Congress, such a 
service has not the freedom that a corporation 
would have in meeting necessary changes in 
rates of pay, but we have increased the pay as 
we could. Rut the conditions as to employ- 
ment have been much improved. The service 
has for a long time made endeavor to improve 
the conditions of the men and officers on its 
vessels. Wiicnevcr repairs are made on ves- 
sels or vessels are designed, special thought is 
given to imi)roving the quarters and condi- 
tions for ship's pconle. I recognize that, 
therefore, the real and perhaps the most seri- 



ous difficulty is the fact that we have not been 
able, with the appropriations by Congress, to 
pay the going wage in many cases. 

Secretary Redfield: We will now hear Capt. 
Irving L. Evans. 

Capt. Evans: Gentlemen, I would like to 
make a few remarks on behalf of the Shipping 
Board. 

In view of some of the statements which 
have been made, and following the remarks 
which have been made by General Uhler and 
the Secretary of Commerce and the representa- 
tives from the Lighthouse Service — as correct- 
ed by General Uhler — the schools which have 
been opened by the shipping board are not 
open to and do not accept as students any 
except those who are qualified under the rules 
and regulations of the United States Supervis- 
ing Inspectors for an examination. In other 
words, unless a man is qualified by experience 
to take an examination for a license, he is not 
qualified for admission to one of the Shipping 
Board's training schools, whether that be in 
engineering or in navigation. 

Secretary Redfield: You are speaking of 
officers' schools? 

Capt. Evans: The Shipping Board has no 
scliools at the present time, Mr. Secretary, 
except for officers. It has no schools for 
training seamen. In other words, it is taking 
students and giving them technical training 
who are already in the service, either in the 
deck department or in the engineering depart- 
ment. This is a school maintained by the -Ship- 
ping Board for the purpose of making officers 
from the material already at hand, by giving 
to the sailor for the deck department an op- 
portunity to become an officer and for giving 
to the oiler, watertendcr or fireman from the 
engine-room an opportunity for becoming an 
engineer. Men who are being trained in these 
schools are, for the most part, men who have 
not held a license. It is to fill the shortage, 
which, I believe, has been recognized here 
for the lower positions. 

I doubt if there is much question that there 
will be sufficient chief engineers or men li- 
censed as chief engineers and those licensed as 
masters to meet the requirements. In that 
connection, I might say that a definite and 
accurate census is being made of all the li- 
censed officers, both for engineering and navi- 
gation, and through the courtesy and coopera- 
tion of the Steamboat Inspection Service, and 
the Department of Commerce, _ the Shipping 
Board and its recruiting service is making that 
census. They are trying to get the names, 
addresses, present occupation of every licensed 
man in the United States; so that they might 
classify and know what they have for service 
upon the deep waters, upon the Great Lakes, 
:ind upon inland waters; so that when the 
time comes, if it should, where there shall be 
a classification or separation, that the man who 
is on the Great Lakes qualified for salt water 
service might be asked to go there; the man 
who is on salt water and is qualified for 
service on the Great Lakes might be asked to 
go there and take a ship, whether it be an 
engineer, or master. 

So that I say that that census is being made 
for the purpose of knowing how many men 
there are in the United States as licensed 
officers today, but to determine definitely 
where they can be used to greatest advantage; 
for the purpose of knowing just where the 
men may be reached who are on shore, if 
necessary, that that man may be asked to go 
and take a vessel, whether it be on inland or 
deep sea voyage. The number of engineers as 
stated bv one of the representatives of the 
Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association, was 
between 29,000 and 30,000, I believe. My un- 
derstanding of that is that it includes every- 
thing from tens upward, all grades and all 
routes. 

In that connection, we are also obtaining 
by this census facts as to routes covered. A 
great many men hold a limited license, in 
many respects of low tonnage and on certain 
classes of boats, second class licenses, and all 
of those dififerent classes must be assorted and 
the number of men definitely determined._ That, 
as I say. is done and as speedily as possible. 

The Shipping Board is trying to train en- 
gineers and navigators to make sure that there 
is no shotagc. They arc advised that there is 
a shortage. The contention has been made 
here that there is not a shortage in cither de- 
partment. I have no accurate figures before 
me, but I have taken an active part in this 
census which is being taken, and am working 
on that at every spare moment, and I feel 
confident that if there is not now a shortage 
of men in the lower grades there will be m 
the very near future. We could not wait un- 
til the time has arrived that a ship is short 
of third assistant engineers or third mates be- 
fore we provide for that man. If we wait, 
as has been suggested by the Secretary, until 
the time arrives when the man's services are 
needed, there will be little opportunity then 
to train him in the technical matters to take 
the examination. 

(To be continued.) 



The American-Hawaiian Steamship Co. has 
closed its agency at San Diego. The company 
l,as had an agency there under full pay, al- 
though it has operated none of its steamers out 
of San Diego for the last eighteen months. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Pag© 5.) 



LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

Headquarters: 

406 N. Clark Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 3637. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. T 19 Main Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 1-2 Ferry Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 47 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio . 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Puluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
IvUdington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



O. 



Relief Stations: 

Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

EUREKA, Cal 227 First Street, P. O. Box 64 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash... 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal... 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C.) Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C.) Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 

BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 10 East Street 

SACRAMENTO, Cal Labor Temple 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



The Broom Makers' Union of 
Wichita Falls, Kan., has signed up 
a scale with the employers which 
provides for an increase of 12 per 
cent. 

The Women's Trade Union I.cagiie 
of Chicago has succeeded in or- 
ganizing the washerwomen of that 
city, and the price of washing will 
be advanced from $2.10 to $2.60. 

After several ineffectual attempts 
to secure conferences with the em- 
ployers the jewelry workers of Chi- 
cago ceased work. They are de- 
manding recognition of their union 
and a wage increase of 10 per cent. 

A strike of nearly 300 employes of 
Frye & Company, Seattle meat 
packers, reduced hours from ten to 
eight with no 'change in wages. Sat- 
isfactory arrangements were made in 
the matter of compelling workers to 
eat at the company's boarding house. 
This movement was handled by 
Butcher Workmen's Union No. 81. 

The most important local item 
carried in the great urgent deficiency 
hill is $7,500,000 for the enlargement 
of the gun factory at the Washing- 
ton Navy Yard. When the plant is 
improved to the c-vtent contemplated 
by this appropriation it will be the 
largest naval gun factory in the 
United States. The work is to be 
pushed with all possible speed. 

Ten thousand and one persons were 
killed in the United States in railroad 
accidents in 1916 and 196,722 were in- 
jured, according to figures covering 
the year made public by the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. As 
usual, the greater number were tres- 
passers on railroad property. Pa.ssen- 
gcrs killed numbered 291: injured, 
fW)8: employes killed. 2941: injured, 
175,923; other persons, including tres- 
passers, killed and injured number 
6769 Mnd 11,791, respectively. These 
figures show an increase over 1915 of 
1371 killed and 34,835 injured. 

Child labor on the farms is being 
severely denounced by those who 
have been observing its results in 
Connecticut. One of the strongest 
opponents is Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Schools Thomas S. Weaver, of 
Hartford, Conn. His condemnation 
is recorded in the following lan- 
guage: "Not a tenth or even a 
twentieth of the boys arc fit for farm 
work anyway," he said. "They're 
just little kids. It is ridiculous to 
put them to that kind of work. Just 
now it's up to the State Labor De- 
partment, but when school opens we 
will see to it that they return. We 
will get them back if we have to 
send a man out to every tobacco 
farm." 

The strike of the brass molders in 
the Empire Brass Company's plant, 
at Lincoln, Ont., which was caused 
by the discharge of coremakers who 
were replaced by women workers at 
a far lower rate of wages, has ended 
in a victory for the union, which | 
took the attitude that if it became 
necessary owing to a shortage of 
labor at any time, it would not op- 
pose the employment of women if 
they were given equal pay with men 
for the amount of work turned out. 
The management refused to consider 
the propositon, with the result that 
the shop was tied up effectively. The 
strike lasted four weeks and ended 
when the company agreed to put men 
back on the work and lay oflf the 
women, who were being used to re- 
duce the wage rate. 



Office Phon* Elliott 11M 



BstAbllshed 1890 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Oate Methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Aatronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

SOO-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamahip Inspector*' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-817 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

26 cenUi and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 



Abolin, K. 
Anderson, J. E. 

-1149 
Andersen, Peter 
Andersen, A. C. 
Anderson, Barney 
Anderson, H. -822 
Andersen, And. 
Arklof, Knut -1821 
Andersen, Julius 
Andersen, K. P. 
Andersen, John 
Anderson, Martin 
Abrahamsen, W. 
Beling, O. 
Birkland, H. J. 
Brown, C. L. 
Bretsen, Joe 
Brandt, Otto 
Bohm. Frank 
Bramley, T. 
Berkman, O. 
Bentte, Paul 
Butta, W. 
Bortelsen. B. 
Ben sen. Helge 
Broundi. F. 
Busch, H. 
Bjurnson, J. 

(package) 
Benedict, Joe 
Berglln, G. H. 
Borvik, C. Eliasen 
Callinen, F. 
Carlson, J. -861 
Christiansen. John 
Connovator, T. St. 
Conse, H. 
Ciinningliam, Geo. 
CadoRan. .1. 
Caravan. W. W. 
De Wall, S. 
Desmond. J. P. 
Dreyer, Jack 
Duyherty, P. J. 
Proje. H. 
Darrow. H. 
Kekstrnm. Goo. 
Klse, Karl 
Ellinssen. Krling 
Eriksen. Sam 
Krlandsen. .Anton 
Eriksen, E. B. 
Rkholm. Giis 
Kriksen. .Mfred 
Rrlksen. E. 
Krikson. .Tohn 
Fnllhorn. J. A. 
Falvig. .Tohn 
Fnitag. W'. 
Frnliing. Fred 
Green. Go. 
Gustafson. Carl J. 
Giistafsen. Emll 
Gabrielsen. Gust 
r.ronbeek, Theo. 
Grau. Avnsel -1116 
Wardv. W. 
Kaiintbnff Fred 
Hansen. Carl 
TTansen, .Tnhn 
TTansen, .Tohannes 
Wansen. Ron. 
Hentsehell, Otto 
Tllrks. C. 
TTprmansen. Gus 
TTnlhere. Obif 
Wvlander. Gns 
TTansen. Olof 
Hunter G. H. 
Tlannelius. Ragnar 



Hosset, C. 
Hendriksen, John 
Jansson, Olof 
Jacobson, John 
Jensen, Harald 
Johnson, A. 
Johnson, Harry 
Johnson, P. M. 
Johnson, Peter 
Johanson, Fred 
Johnson, C. J. -1566 
Johnstone, A. C. 
Johnstone, Geo. W. 
Johnson, Alex 
Julison, C. A. 
Jargenbeck, J. 
Johanson, J. R. 
Kallasman, E. 
Karlberg, Fred. 
Kendrick, W. E. 
Kimera, G. E. 
Koppen, B. 
Kristiansen, J. A. 
I>ampe, Fred 
Learned, J. W. 
Lersten, J. O. 
Lindstrom, T. 
Lowuin, J. 
Loftman, H. O. 
Luther, Alfred 
Lackey, C. 
Larsen, Emll 
Lundberg, C. 
Larsen, M. E. L. 
Llndecker, C. 
Larsen, Ejernd 

(package) 
Larsen, C. -1516 
Macdonald, H. 
Maybaum, W. 
McPherson, J. R. 
McKeoun. F. 
Meier, Geo. 
Mitchell, A. 
Mortensen. Aug. 
Morken, M. 
Monsen, B. 
Mortensen, .1. B. 
Magi. John 
McNiool, G. C. 
Madsen. Johannus 
Mikkelsen. K. -1620 
Mostad. IJeonard 
Mikkelsen. P. 
Madsen, C. H. 
Matson, Eric 
McLaughlin, Dan 
Nelsson, A. W. 
Nellsen, H. L. -125R 
Nelsen. Senn Fr. 
Nelson, .Joseph 
Nelsen. F. H. -1347 
Nerlin. Geo. 
Nordstrom. G. E. 
Nordfelt. T. F. 
Nelsen, N. P. 
Nilsen, N. B. 
Nelson. M. -l.^SO 
Newman. John 
Newland. E. 
Naro. J. 
Nelsen. L. 
Olsen, Eric 
Olsen. C. A. -1302 
Olsen. A. M. 
Olsen. E. O. 
Olsen. .Tulius 
Olsen. Elmar 
Olsen. K. -6S24 
Omholt. L. 
Orell. A. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER «, HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIQ STORES 

Stors No. 1— Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY- WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Andersson. Alberto Nelson, C. W. 
Carlstrand, G. Nielsen, Niel.-! -751 

Darbarog, Martin Palken. G. 
Hodson, H. I. Pearson. Fred 

Holmstrom, Carl A. Petterson. Hjalmar 
Jacobson, Gustaf Pettersen. Charles 
Kalberg. William -472 

Keinanen, Emil Slmonsen, Sam 

Magnusson, Ernest Stewart, Wm. H. 
W. Suemlnen, Oscar 

Martinsson, E. Swansen, Carl 

Marx. Thorvald 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hats, Shoes, 

Trunks and Suitcases 

Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8393 



6,S24 



Olsen, C. Otto 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, Johan S. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen. Johan 
Olsen. Hialmar Fr 
Olsen, Henry 
Olsen. J. H. 
Ovvall, .Tohan 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen. A. M. 
Olsson, C. M. 
Peters. F. W. 
Petersen. .T. 
Petersen. Oscar 
Porter. John 
Pusgrioff. S. 
Petterson. Chr. 
Pederson. H. -1560 
Perkins, Floyd 
Petersen, Hans L. 
Ravmen. John 
Ricsbeek. Hjalmar 
Rose. E M. 
Riiter. P. 
TJvIander. R 
Rasmussen. T.,. 
Rlsrossa. John 
Riir-kmiek Anton 
Rnsnes. C. R. 
rfiissel. Arthur 
RnnstiMim. .Albert 



Renstrom, P. 
Sarin, C. 
Sabo, Arthur 
Sandnes, Oscar 
Sather, John 
Schwortz, Peter 
Sohroeder, Paul 
Siewertsen, M. C. 
Selmer. K. K. 
Seyfried. M. 
Sorensen, James 
Sorensen, Geo. 
Sorensen, Maurltz 
Stenfors, G. 
Stratton, H. J. 
Strand, A. E. 
Sverdrup. Walter 
Swanson, Ruben 
Sigvartsen, A. 
Slmonsen. A. S. 
Smith. Emil 
Seibert, Henry 
Sorensen, Carl 
Stein. J. 
Saxley, C. H. 
Sivertsen, Karl 
Talleson. Kr. 
Tamis, J. 
Thorsen. Chr. 
Thiel. Werner 
Thorstensen. Carr 
Thomson. Hans 



Q M O K" F R ^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
O iVI V^ IV x:^ rv »J box in which you are served. 

Issued by Auitionlyor the Cigaf Makers' Imeinalionai Union o? America 

Union -made Cigars. 

iJituS (EpilrflfS Irw Ui. e«,m conmnta mihn bo. mn t»w rnjin 17« fllSt-CUSS Workmail 
j«[liet«OfIMtbCMy«[(a'lHUSMiIiOIWlUIIIO«ill *««im. inofojiuHlxm^evotMrttlmd. 
MnMiii»nl il Ht MOI!«.MAnRlAljn() nmUCHIAt HUlMt Of TKt CRMt. TI»n<on«t HOOBMIK 
UltM C)94r) to J11 srnolkeri t^roua^cut in« wotM 
' All Ifl(tin9in«nu upon this Lital mil be puni&Md according to Uw. 



"if! K (^Uitu^a, Ptradent, 



Eureka, CaL 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick servlc* 

233 Second Street, Eureka. Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," ths "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
I^Ager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE~MEAL 

- Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTER 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING SHOES, HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 
207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 
E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trad* at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond. Wash. 



Phone 263 



"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST.. HOQUIAM, WASH. 



Tergensen, A. N. 
Tirnqvlst, H. 
'I'auminen, John 
Trygg. G. 
Treaner. Chas. A. 
'I'hern, Arvld 
Thai, Richard 
Tergersen, E. 
Unkila. Paul 
Valentlnsen. G. 
Walberg. John 
Walsh. P. J. 
Wcsterlund, Albert 



Wiemers, H. M. 
Wold, S. 
Wurst, Walter 
Williams, T. C. 
Walker, H. W. 
Walker, J. H. 
Woodley, Clifford 
Wellbrook, Henry 
WInstrom. Oscar 
Wold, J. J. 
Zllenk, A. 
Zellnk, A. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Photo by Terkelson & Henry 



SEAMEN! 

Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

Invites All Seamen to His Up-to-Date Store in 
the New Southern Pacific Building 

20 and 22 STEUART ST., S. F. 

MERCHANDISE COVERING THE WANTS 

OF ALL SEAMEN 

Uniforms, Hats, Caps and Shoes 

WATERPROOF OIL SKINS 
and RUBBER BOOTS 

Come In and Inspect My Entire New Stock of 
UNION MADE GOODS 



H 



ome 



N 



ew« 



At the municipal primary in Day- 
ton, Ohio, on August 14, the So- 
cialist candidates received 11,017 
votes, which exceeds the combineil 
\ote of all other parties. 

Harvard University has announced 
that owing to the scarcity of doc- 
tors the Medical School will be open 
to women. Ten women students have 
made application. 

After the trial of the 157 members 
of the Twenty-fourth infantry at Fort 
Bliss, Texas, for rebellion and the 
killing of seventeen persons at Hous- 
ton, the Negro regiment will be or- 
dered to the Philippines for service 
until the end of the war. 

Among the important food crops, 
ranking next to wheat, corn and po- 
tatoes is the army and navy bean. 
Last year the only States that pro- 
duced as much as a million bushels 
were Michigan, California and New 
York. This year several States will 
produce much more than that. Mich- 
igan will produce 8,000,000 bushels, 
which is almost equal to the entire 
crop of 1916. California follows with 
7.268,000 bushels; New York, 2,835,- 
000 l)ushels; Colorado with 2,601,000 
bushels, or 22,141,000 bushels in all. 
Multiply last year's crop by three 
and the total is not much over the 
estimate of 1917. 

The Grand Army of the Republic 
was organized in Illinois, fifty-one 
years ago, as a fraternal, charitable, 
and patriotic association to be com- 
posed exclusively of soldiers and 
sailors of the United States during 
the war of 1861-65. At one time 
it had 7500 Posts, distributed over 
every State and Territory of the 
Union, and its membership number- 
ed 450,000 comrades. Its annual 
gatherings used to test the capacity 
of the larger cities of the country, 
and its parades were often miles in 
length, requiring many hours to pass 
a given point. At one time or an- 
other, nearly every man who won 
fame in the Civil War had a place 
ill its ranks. 

The Soldiers and Sailors Insur- 
ance bill has passed the House of 
Representatives unanimously. It gives 
enlisted men in the army and navy 
the option to insure their lives to 
the extent of $10,000 at a cost of $8 
per $1000. Full payment is to be 
made in case of death. In case of 
total disability the injured person 
will get from $40 to $100 a month. 
In addition to insurance the bill 
provides for payment to dependents. 
A widow is to receive $35 a month 
if childless. Should there be one 
child the payment is to be $45, if two 
$52.50, if three $57.50 and if four or 
more $62.50. A motherless child is 
to get $20; two $35; three $45; four 
,$55, and five or more, $65. 

American war preparations move 
on with the utmost haste. Following 
tlie gathering of the first five per 
cent, of the draft call at the train- 
ing camps plans are announced for 
increasing the army to over 2,000,000 
men. A bill to draft friendly aliens 
in the United States, involving more 
than a million men, has passed the 
Senate. Much stress is laid upon 
the invention of the "Liberty Motor,'" 
an airplane engine that is said to be 
liighly efficient yet of such sim- 
plicity that its parts can be made 
in many shops to be assembled 
where needed. The increasing im- 
portance of airplanes as a military 
weapon, and the enormous demand 
for their immediate production, will 
tiuis l)c met by the new motor. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The wreck of the Norwegian- 
America liner "Kristianiafjord," was 
sold at public auction at St. Johns, 
N. F., to M. P. Cashion for $2,600. 

The keel of the first wood steam- 
er for the Imperial Munitions Board 
has been laid in the shipyard of 
Grant and Home, Courtcnay Bay, 
N. B. 

The new tern schooner "E. F. Will- 
iams," recently launched from Will- 
iams' shipyard, Dartmouth, is re- 
ported to have been sold to Halifax 
parties to be used in trade between 
Nova Scotia and Southern ports. 

A contract for the building of 
two wooden ships has been given to 
the Three Rivers Shipyard, Ltd., 
of Three Rivers, N. S., a newly 
formed local company. Anticipa- 
tions are that further contracts 
will be obtained shortly. 

Nearly $400,000 will be invested 
by the J. H. Mendel Engineering & 
Construction Co. of Manchester, N. 
H., in the construction of the ship- 
yards they have just established at 
Newington, close to Dover Point, 
at an advantageous point just be- 
low Portsmouth, N. H. In these 
yards they propose to build during 
the coming 14 months 30 vessels of 
the Ferris type. The ships are to 
be built on a percentage basis. 

Comment has been made over the 
fact that the three sugar cargoes 
American yards, with the idea that 
they shall fly the American flag, 
sent from St. Croix to the United 
States this season have been carried 
by Norwegian ships. St. Croix is 
now a United States possession, 
forming part of the Virgin Islands 
group, but navigation between the 
mainland and the islands does not 
come within the scope of the coast- 
wise laws. 

Contracts are pending between the 
Government and the American-Inter- 
national Corporation to build a new 
shipyard near Newark, where it is 
planned to put together at least 
2(X) merchant ships of from 5,000 to 
7,.S00 tons each. Another yard will 
be at Hog Island, near Philadelphia, 
for which the Submarine Boat Co. 
will get the contract. A third yard 
will be built by the Merchants Ship- 
building Corp. at Chester, Penn. 
Fabricated ships will be constructed 
at these yards. 

The steamer "Powhattan" was 
towed to Norfolk, Va., on August 
22 after lying on bottom of Chesa- 
peake Bay eight months, to be made 
ready for sea. Failing to float the 
vessel after spending several thou- 
sand dollars, the former owners, 
the Merchants and Miners' Line, 
abandoned the vessel. After libel 
proceedings against the vessel by 
the tank steamer "Telena," with 
which she was in collision, the court 
ordered the steamer sold. She was 
I)urchased by Robert Hasler for 
$21,600. 

It is said that more than $2,000,000 
profit was made on the sale of the 
Merchants anad Miners' Transporta- 
tion Company's steamships "Somer- 
set" and "Suwannee,"' to the Ocean 
Steamship Company of Savannah. 
Although each of these steamships 
had been in service for more than 
six years, they each sold for $1,010,- 
000 more than they cost to Iniild. 
Both vessels were built at a cost 
of $4.S0,000 each. It is said that 
the Ocean Steamship Company paid 
$3,000,000 for the two, or at the rate 
of $1,500,000 for each vessel. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Cor. Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1917 
Assets -....-. 

Deposits ....... 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ... 

Employees' Pension Fund - . - - - 

Number of Depositors - . - . - 



$64,566,290.79 

61,381,120.63 

2,185,170.16 

259,642.88 

65,717 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
tliese columns siiould at once notifj 
I. M. Holt. Headquarters Sailors' Union 
San Francisco, to forward same to th> 
port of their destination. 



Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, Nils 
Anderson, P. 

tnderson, Victor E. 
nderson, Wilford 
Andersson, A. -1060 
Andcrsson, E. -17S1 
Andersson, Oskar 
Andreasen, Hans 

-1477 
Anderson, J. A. 
Anslimit, Alartin 
Antonscn, Curl 
Aspe, T. 
Auzin, A. -363 
Ayiward, James 

Bindberg, O. F. 
Biedersiedt, Fritz 
Bindling. O. -22»i 
Blom. Nils 
Boiscn, Jorgen 
Borg. A. 
Boswell, J. W. 
Bower, Gosta 
Breien. Hans 
Brevick, John 
Brown, George 
Buhler, Karl 
Byers, A. 

Christiansen, Louis 
Christiansen, Sam 
CliristofCersen, G. 
Clipper, Mike 
Clever, Hugo 
Corcoran, C. L. 
Comstedt. Oscar 
Conolly, Frank 
Cooistra, Sam 

Deswi rt, Wni. 
Dettloft, W. C. 
L>exter, Arthur 
Didrickbon, Martin 
Donwoody, G. 
Dracar, E. 
Dracar, Ivan Z. 
Dumas, C. 
Dunkel, Charley 
Dunn, Walter 
Dutra. Anthony 
Dybdal. Olaf 

Ellingsen, Erling 
Elward. Jim 
I'^ngclscn, D. A. 
F.rickson. Alf. 
Kiickson, Chas. 
Evenson, E. V. 

Farcum, Andrew Foss, Laurits 
Farrell. Bernard Franke, Charlie 

Farrell, Harry Fredholm, Chas. J. 

Fernold, H. V. Fredriksen, Birgler 

Fergerson, Thomas Fredrilisen, F. M. 
Firguson, E. A. Fredrickson, Martin 



.\baling, Matias 
Abrahamson, Alfred 
-•Vlik-rs, H. 
Alilqulst, Evert J. 
Albert, J. C. 
Albertsen, Peter S. 
Albrecht, Chas. 
Allen. W. A. 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, K. P. 
Andersen, Martin 
Andersen. O. -HIS 
Andersen, S. P. 
Anderson, A. 
Anderson, A. -2031 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Chas. 

Baach, A. 
Baak, M. 
Backstrom, Folke 
Baker, C. 
Barry, William J. 
Beckford, David 
Berggren, Oscar 
Bergman, Werner 
Berk, E. W. 
Bertelson, Oskar 

-2184 
Berthelsen, Charles 
Beselin, Ed. 

Campbell, G. 
Caiiipueli. Martin 
Carlsen. Pete 
Carmeli, G. 
Carr, W. O. 
Cassimos, C. 
Cederlof, Knut 
Chilc-ott, G. 
Cliristensen, O. G. 
Cliristensen, Oscar 

Dahlgren, W. A. 
Dahlgren, William 
Dandman, John 
Danielsen, Louis M. 
Danielson, Eric 
Uanielson. J. 
Davey, Chas. 
Decoe, Eugene 
Degroot, George 
Dehler. A. M. 
De Rose, E. W. 
Deswert, Robert 

Eaton, Isaac N. 
Eck, Chas. 
Ekholm, Frank 
Eklund, Qua. 

lOkhiiid, John 
Ekstioni, Viktor 



Fjillnuin, George 
Flottcii. James G. 
Forsberg, Sven 
Ganser, Joe 
Garden, Charlie 
Gardner, Hans 
Gasch, Wm. 
Gasman, George 
Gassner, Joe 
Globe, John 
Gent, Adam C. 
Gerard, Albert 
Gerber, Leland K. 
Gonarshang. G. 
Gottwold, Gus 
Grabower, Martin 
Grantz, John 



Freiberg, Karl 
Friberg, Peter 
Frick, H. C. 
Grau, A. 
Gray, Hamilton 
Green, J. 
Greir, A. 
Gregg. R. O. 
Gregoliet, Ed. 
Gregory, Antonio 
Gunderson, George 
Gundersen, Kristian 
Gunderson, J. 
Gunderson. John 
Gunther, Ted 
Gustafson, Chas. 
Gustafsson, Valter 



Hackensmlth, R. C. Hegg. Blrger 
Hagberg. Gust. Heinonen, Kusta 

Hag.stidt. Charles Helgesrn, George 
Hahne. Wllhelm B. Heis, J. S. 
Halbeck, Oscar Hellman, H. W. 

Hale, Kingley Henriersen, H. 

Ilalvarsen, O. -1167H(niirrson, R. 
Hansen, A. -2542 Hendriksen, John 



Hansen, Axel H. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hansen. J. -2354 
Hansen, J. -2156 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, M. -96R 
Hansen, Pagaard 
Hansen. W. C. H. 
Hanson, Rudolph 
Haraldsen, Alf 
Harburg, Walter 
Haugen, Hans C. 



Henke, Ernest 
Henriksen, Harald 
Herman, David 
Hermansson. C. P. 
Hole, Sigvald 
Hoff. Axel 
Holm, O. 
Holmstrom. Hjal- 

mar 
Horton, Bert 
Hubertz, Kniil 
Hughes, W. L. 



Ingebritbsen, Alfred 
Isaacson, J. 

Jacklin, Chas. 
jauuuben, Chas, 
Jacobson, Emll 
Jaeotis, Henry 
Jacousun, j^utvard 
Jacubsun, Joakim 
JukoUsen, M. 
Jaiison, Brandrop 
Janson, Ernst 
Janssun, Frediik 
jajzuinuecK, J. 
Jensen, jb*i'iis 
Jensen, O. K. 
Jesporsen, Martin 
Julianesen, Arvid 
Johannessen, A. 

-1487 
lohannesen, J. 

-1441 
ivaktin, E. 
Kailas, A. 
.valiuerg, Arvid 
ivalnin, J. 

Kaspersen, H. -1100 
ivat;^, Fred, 
ivindlund, Otto 
ICinney, Fred. P. 
.vipste, Ciiariey 
Kjell, John 
iviinieberg, Stenof 
Klotzke, Otto 

Lainpe, Fred 
Larsen, C. A. 



Isberg, Wicktar 
Ivertsen, Sigvaid B. 



Johansen 


Gunner 


Johansen 


H. V. 


Johansen 


Ole 


Johanson 


Axel 


Johnson, 


Arnold 


Johnson, 


Aug, R. 


Johnson, 


Carl 


Juituson, 


U. M. 


Johnson, 


John 


Johnson, 


John H. 


Johnson, 


Julius N. 


Johnsson, 


C. J. 


-1066 




Jonsson, 


P. W. 


Jordan, O. 


Jorgenser 


, Carl W. 


Jorgensen 


, Walther 


Joyce, W 





M. 
Christian 
Hakon 
Hans 
Herman 
J. 
Uogner 



Lai 

Larsen, 
Larsen, 
Larsen, 
Larsen, 
Larsen, 
Larson, Axel 
Larson, Carl 
Larsson, Adolf 
Ijarsson, Alfred R. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Last. Paul 
Langreder, H. 
Leaniey, VV. 
Ledston, Chas. 
Leiitonen, J. O. 
i^eiUecker, E. 
Lidslen, Charles 
Linder, V. 
Luidblom, Edw. 

Maas. Joseph P. 
Maalla, John 
Macchi, Willy 
Maclsen, Holm 
.iMaUsea, Luuvig 
aiagnuson, Carl 
Maki, Ivar 
Malmstrom, E. 
Marckwardt, Carl 
.Vlartiiidale, John 
Martinesen, L>. 
Martin, J, F. -2604 
-Martin, Jos. 
Marlin. R. F. 
MelJermot, William 
MiKeoun, Thos, 
McNeil, U. R. 
Nelsen, C. -936 
Nelsen, Olaf 
Nelson, A. 
Nelson, Adolph H. 
Nelson, A. VV. 
Nelson, Harry 
Nelson, Joseph 
Niehaus, E. 
Nielsen, J. F. 
Ohm, John 
OJeda, Leonardo 
Clausen, Christ. 
U'Leary, John 
Olesen, Chas. 
Olesen, F. C. 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, C. M. 
Olsen. E. F. -1280 

F. -124a 

George 

John 

O. -1123 



1)1 

Olsen, 

Olsen, 

Olsen, 

I'alm, A 

I'aludan, 

Palu. G. 

I'atreka, 

l^uuIsHun, 

Pedersen, 

Pedersen, 

Pedersen, 

Pederson, 

I'erks, F. 

Peise, G. 

Person, N. F. 

I'eterer, Joseph 

Petersen, Chris 

Petersen, Olav 

Petersen, Walter 

G. 
Ramstad, Andreas 
Rand, J. 
Randropp. John 
Kasmussen, Axel 
Rasnmssen, Emil 
i;asmussen. Jacob 



Chas. 

A, 

ilerman 
George 
Henrik 
Louis 
S. R. 
L. 



Knitzer, A. 
Knoppe, Wm. 
Koferd, George 
Kurneluis. Martin 
Koski, Jiiho 
Kosler, Walter 
Kristensen, K. D. 
Krlstiansen, Jakob 
Kroft, Harry 
Kroon, R. VV. -1142 
Krumese, Adam 
Kuhn, John 

Lindberg, W. 
Lmu, (justaf A. 
Lindroos, A. W. 
Liverdal, G. 
Lofgren, Ricliard 
Lohne, Evan 
Lorensen, Nick 
Lorentzeen, Krist 
Lorin, Christian 
Luckner, A. 
Lundberg, Allan 
Lund, E. 

Lundeen, Eric F. 
Ludewig, Ed. 
Lunderwold, Finn 
Lundmark, Helge 
Lundmark, J. O. H, 
Lundquist, C. A. 
Lunstedi. Chris. 
Lutke, Carl 
Lyngaard, Jorgen 

Melander, G. I.,. 
Mikkelsen, Jack 
Mikkelson, Peter 
Miller, R. E. 
Merlheus, H. 
Mohr, Chas. 
Moller, C. R. 
Moller, H. 
Monroe. John 
Moonan, Thos. 
Moore, Wm. 
Mott, G. 
Monteiro, Joe 
Morris, O. R. 
Moyei. W. 
Myrhoi, J. P. 

Nielson, S. 
NlUson- Josef 
Nilson, Anders 
Nilson, O. 
Noble, tred 
Nolan, James 
Norberg, J. A. 
Norris, Norman A. 
Nurminen, John G. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olsen, uswald 
Olsen, Peder 
Olsen, R. B. 
Olsen, Siegfried 
Olson, Thomas 
Olsson, J. 
Oltmanii, Theodore 
Osen, Aksel 
O.solix, Oskar 
Osterburg, J. F. 
Osterhoft, H. 
(jverKaard. Peter 

Petersen, Wlllielm 
Peterson, R. T, 
Peterson, Viktor 
Petter, G. 
Petterson, O. 
Petterson, O. -1551 
I'eltersson, Eugen 
Pettersson, Konrad 
Phantsih, C, 
Plillinan, Ueortre 
Pihlstrom, R. J. 
Pollock, T. 
Porter, Henry 
Postuma, K. 
Poysky, Jahlniar 
Pusner. W. T. 

Rehs, Paul 
Relth. K. C. R. 
Retal, Otto 
Riesbeck, Hjalmar 
Rics, Robert E. 
Rilwe, Karl 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 
^^ JOE WEISS 

^^H Union Made Shoes for Men 

^^^^ Exclusively 

^^^^L^ 28 EAST STREET, near Market 

^B^^^^ Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

^^^^^^^^ Telephone Douglas 1619 

^^^^V^^^ Repairing Done VA/hlle You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 
^HHlH^H Work Called For and Delivered 

^^^^P WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



Kinkor, 1>. Ross. ^X. A. 

Kollo, R. Rou, Gustav 

lionger, Henry Ruekmieh. Anton 

Riisenlilad, .Axel Rundstrom. Albert 

Kosenblad, E. A. Ryder, Albert 



Saalmann, Jooseph 
dahlberg, Waldemar 
Sander. Otto 
Sander, Robert 
Sanne. Rudolph 
Saunders, Chas. 
Savage, Roland 
:^eanlon, John 
Schamm. Charles 
.Siliippman, Herman 
Schlager, Chr. 
Sehlkore, Otto 
■Schmidt, E. -1570 
Sehultz. Albert 
Schwartz, Karl 
Schwendt, Walde- 
mar 
Kigwart.oen. Arthur 
Skoglund, Harry 
''kotvik, OIp m. 
Slipper, Karl 
Smedsvle, Oluf R. 
Smith, Edward F. 
Smith, W. -707 

Tamisar, Peter 
Tamlnga, H. 
Taugel. R. -876 
Tellefssen. A. E. 
Tham. Alec 
Thaysen, A. 
Thee. Rudolph 
Thomsen, Peder 
Thompson, Benjam 
Thompson. G. F. 
Tiiompson, John 
Thomson, Guss 
Thorsen. Hans K. 

Valarias, L. 
Van P.argen, F. 
Veerkamp, J. J. 

Walenius. Karl E. 
^Vallin. Bereer 
Walter. John 
W'ank. Roman 
Ward. Jack 
Wasserloos, Rudolf 

Zeaberg. Jack 
Zeritt, John 



Smith, W. 
Spencer, Harry 
Spets. Karl 
Sprogae, Theo. 
Sprogoi, T. 
St. Clair, Chris, 
St, Clair, Thomas 
Stennesen. Harald 
Stenroos, Frans 
Stevenson, A. 
Staufft, Roy 
Stratten. H. B. 
Strom, Vattor 
Svensen, Anker F. 
Svensen, Anker 
Svensson, W. -25fll 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Swanson, B. 
Swanson. .T. -1013 
Swanson, John I,. 

V. 
Rwinka. Albert 
Sj'versen, Oskar 



Thorsen, 


Herman 


Thorsen, 


Tor. 


Tlngberg, 


Axel 


Tjersland 


Sverre 


Tonissen. 


P. G. 


Tonnesen 


Andreas 


Tompson. 


Fritz 


Torstensen. Barny 


inTorrance, 


John 


Trovlck. 


Harold 


Twede, J 




TwA.-da'e 


T1. S. 


Tysk, J. 


H. 


Velnoda, 


F. 


Vickery. 


Curtis 


Vrlki, Silas 


■WUcmann F W. 


Wenzel. 


Albert 


Wego. ■n 


illiams 


Wiekstrom. Axel 


Woodley, 


E. R. 



Ziehr, Ernst 



PACKAGES. 



Andersen. Andov 
Berllng, J. B. 
Carl.<!on, .Tohn 
Oettloff, W. C. F. 
Grenne. O. H. 
Gunvaldsen, Ingvald 
Jaoobsen. Alfred 
Jensen, Hans 
Johansen, T. A. 
Johansson, Werner 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larsen, Ed. 



l.aurlsen, Niels 
Lawbcrg, A. W. 
Murray, Con. P. 
Myers. W. 
Neumann, H. J. 
Olsen. H. C. 
Olsen. R. B. 
Oslund, O. 
Olsson. C. G. -1101 
Sandpr. Otto 
Rmedsvlk, O. B. 
Thorsen. Thor. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION. ETC, 
REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF CON- 
GRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912, 
of Coast Seamen's Journal, published 
weekly at San Francisco, Cal., for 
October 1, 1917. 

State of California. 
County of San Francisco — ss. 

Before me. a Notary Public in and for 
the State and county aforesaid, person- 
ally appeared I. M. Holt, who, having 
been duly sworn according to law, de- 
poses and says that he Is the Business 
Manager of the Coast Seamen's Journal, 
and that the following is. to the best 
of his knowledge and belief, a true 
statement of the ownership, manage- 
ment (and if a daily paper, tlie circu- 
lation), etc., of the aforesaid publica- 
tion for the date shown in the above 
i-aption, required by the Act of August 
24, 1912, embodied in section 443, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the 
reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publisher, editor, managing editor, 
.and b\isinoss managers are: 

Name of — Postofflce address — 

Publisher, Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg. San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Business Manager, I. M. Holt, San 

Frnneisco, Cal. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names 
and addresses of individual owners, or, 
if a corporation, give its name and the 
names and addresses of stockholders 
owning or holding 1 per cent, or more 
of the total amount of stock.) 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, San Fran- 
eiseo; not a corporation. Principal offl- 
<ers of the Sailors' Union: Andrew Fu- 
ruseth. Secretary: Ed. Andersen, Treas- 
urer. San Francisco. 

.I. That the known bondholders, mort- 
gagees, and other security holders own- 
ing or holding 1 per cent, or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages, or 
other securities are: (If there are none, 
so st.ate.) 

None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next 
above, giving the names of the owners, 
stockholders, and security holders. If 
anv. contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders ,is they ap- 
i>ear upon the books of the company 
hut also, in c.tsps where the stockholder 
or security holder appears upon the 
books of the company as trustee or In 
Tny other fiduciary relation, the name of 
the person or corporation for whom such 
trustee is acting, is given: also that the 
«,Tld two paragr.nphs contain statements 
embr.acing affiant's full knowledge and 
V'plief as to the circumstances and con- 
llllons under which stockholders and se- 
curity holders who do not appear upon 
tlie books of the company as trustees, 
' fild stock and securities In a capacity 
otlier than that of a bona fide owner; 
anil this affiant has no reason to believe 
th.Tt nnv other person, .association, or 
corporation has any Interest direct or in- 
llrect In the said stock, bonds, or other 
securities than as so stated by him. 
I. M. HOLT, Business Manager. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 22il day of September, 1!>17. 
(Seal) MATTIE G. STIRLING. 

(My commission expires June 14, 1921.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY- AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXELi LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRiSTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICREL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Phone Kearny 2518 



HULTEN a RUDOLPH 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 

UNION TAILORS 

SUITS TO ORDER 

CLEANING and PRESSING 

39 Sacramento Street Near Market 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources . .$7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 



G. Beleney 
.T. A. Berpre.rot 
S. Blssinger 
I>eon Bocqueraz 
O. Bozio 
Charles Carpy 



DIRECTORS 

J. M. Dupas 
John Glnty 
J. 8. Godeau 
Arthur I,eeallet 
Geo. W. McNear 
X. De Plchon 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN!! 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

is now located in Permanent Quarters 

— at — 

20-22 STEUART STREET 

in the new Southern Pacific Building 



ENTIRE NEW STOCK 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



Beer 




H 



iTnion 

MADE 



•Ale 

AND 

Porter 



^5Xa Of America ric^>^ 

COPYRIGHT STRADE MARKBEGISTERED 1903 



THIS IS OUR LABEL 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 
SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 
Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 
103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HOTEL MELBA 

Connected with Falstaff Restaurant 

UP-TO-DATE FURNISHED ROOIVIS BY 

THE DAY, WEEK OR MONTH 

Rooms, 25c to $1.00 per Night 

$1.50 to $3.50 per Week 

Hot and Cold Water in Each Room 

Free Bath 

Phone Kearnv 5044 214 JACKSON ST. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The following members of the 
crew of the "Archer," in 1915, from 
liellingham, Wash., to the Atlantic 
Coast, arc inquired for by M. 
Thoniipson & Co., 112 Market St., 
San Francisco, Cal.: Peter E. Hed- 
wall, A. Lofstrom, S. Carlson, G. F. 
Larsen, M. Nangc, F. Cuplin, W. 
How, Richard Dalzell and Bert 
Tallus. 10-3-17 



Phone Douglas 4290 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

BANKERS INVESTIVIENT BUILDING 

Rooms 448-450, Fourth Floor 

Two Entrances: 

742 Market Street 49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



PACIFIC NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Study for your license with a practical Shipmaster and 

Up-to-Date Navigator 
Pupils studying with me will receive personal attention 

CAPTAIN A. B. SOWDEN, 

Rooms 340-41 Montgomery Block 
Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets San Francisco 



RELLEHER &l BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 



SUITS TO ORDER, ^ 
$30.00 TO $50.00 

Union Made 
in Our Own Shop 




Weekly Wages 
No Piece Work 

Eight-Hour Work Day 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 

Proprietors 
Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
tAN FRANCItCO 



News from Abroad 



Porto Rico made 502,398 tons of 
sugar during the season that ended 
with August. This is the largest 
crop in the history of the island. It 
is estimated that 450,000 tons have 
lieen shipped to the refiners in the 
United States. 

Surplus or exportable wheat in 
Australia amounts to 135,927,000 
bushels, in India, 80,538,000 bushels, 
and in Argentina, 26,107,000. Owing 
to the shortage of tonnage, however, 
and the long voyage, this wheat 
cannot be moved at present. 

Airplanes capable of carrying 25 
men and of traveling 900 miles with- 
out a stop have been developed in 
Italy. Airplanes of still greater ca- 
pacity have been designed by the 
same constructors. It is with such 
planes that the fortifications of 
Trieste and Pola have been bom- 
barded. 

A dynamite bomb with a fuse at- 
tached to it was found recently in 
the hold of a coal laden Norwegian 
steamer which arrived at Havana 
from an American port. The bomb 
was at the bottom of the cargo. 
Two men were killed recently while 
unloading a cargo at the same dock. 
The vessel on which the men were 
killed sailed from the same American 
port from which the Norwegian ves- 
sel came. 

In i)rinciple the British govern- 
ment fj of the opinion. Lord Robert 
Cecil, British Minister of Blockade, 
told the House of Commons August 
20, tnat neutral shipping which has 
been persistently and continuously 
assisting Great Britain's enemies 
should be treated after the war on 
the same footing as enemy shipping. 
\'cssels that lie in port in conse- 
quence of the German government's 
threats, the Minister added, would 
certainly be considered as assisting 
the belligerent objects of the enemy. 

That municipally-owned railless 
trolleys have proven a success in 
Bradford, England, is reported by 
the United States Consul, Augustus 
K. Ingram. It yields a profit to the 
city. The fare is graded according 
to distances and average one and 
three-tenths of a cent per mile. Half 
fares are charged before 9 a. m., the 
lowest fare being one cent, and 
special reduced fares for children 
going to and returninc; from school. 
The operating cost of 18 cars was 
$.0155 per car mile. The mimber of 
passengers carried was 3,402.955. The 
system requires but one-tenth the 
cajiital of an ordinary street railway 
system. 

According to statistics published at 
the close of the third year of war, 
the Central Powers have so far 
made over 3,000,000 prisoners, and the 
booty amounts to 12,156 guns, 8352 
machine guns, 1,655,805 rifles, 16,640 
immition wagons, 5216 gun carriages, 
5.000,000 artillery shells, and count- 
less other war material. These 
figures, it is added, account only for 
I lie booty transported to the home 
country, whereas it is impossible to 
estimate the material that has been 
immediately put to use again at the 
front, h'inally the area occupied by 
tile Central Powers is estimated at 
.548,800 square kilometers; that is 
considerably more than the total area 
of the German Empire. It is further 
pointed out that the Central Powers 
iiavc reduced 47 fortresses, and that 
the area occupied by the Entente in 
Europe amounts in all to not more 
tlian 15,900 square kilometers. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



"Mrs. Flubdub has left her hus- 
band." 

"The poor thing! I must run 
right over and condone with her." 

'■ 'S no use. She won't tell what 
for." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



No Choice. — Officer — Hang it! 
you've brought the wrong boots. 
Can't you see one is black and the 
other brown? 

Batman — Sure, but the other pair 
is just the saem. — Passell's Saturday 
Journal. 



Raw. — Officer — That's a pretty awk- 
ward lot you've got now, Sergeant. 

Sorely Tried Sergeant-Instructor — 
They are that, sir. It's the like o' 
them, sir as brings 'ome to us what 
a horrible thing this war is, sir! — 
Passing Show. 



The Crux. — He'd never really been 
keen on soldiering. 

He'd only gone into the Army be- 
cause he couldn't very well avoid it. 

But hitherto he had gone through 
with it without making a conspicu- 
ous ass of himself. 

Now, however, that the moment 
was at hand, the moment that would 
really test him, he knew himself for 
a coward. 

He felt a worm, a jelly-fish, no 
man — he felt, in fact, a conglomera- 
tion of all the emotions that analyti- 
cal novelists, depicting their heroes 
in blue funk, had described at length 
in the days before there was a paper 
shortage. 

And the earth refused to open and 
swallow him. 

And even the opportunity of run- 
ning away was denied him, for the 
l)rutal sergeant — he'd always disliked 
that particular sergeant — had set him 
in front of the first rank inside the 
hollow square and was huskily whis- 
pering in his ear: "Now, me lad, if 
yer will be a blinkin' hero, go up 
and take yer medicine." 

"Corporal Smith," called an officer, 
reading from a paper. 

And Corporal Smith guiltily crawled 
forward to receive from the hands 
of the general the decoration he had 
earned in France. — London Opinion. 



Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of his 

money In a reliable savings bank. If 

you are making money now, why not 

put aside something for a rainy day? 

Savings and Commercial Depts. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Do you like a good, long, cool 
smoke? If so, get a package of 
Bagley's Lime Kiln Club Cut 
Plug for your pipe. Manufac- 
tured by John J. Bagley & Co. 
for over fiftv years. 



iDurnvDitniu 

•^9 



AotMb ot thi i^ . 

!9gk.iiiTDtiunoiUL { 
union. 

($ju^£.^»u.| Made 



Jnion 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man. and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




HENRY HEINZ 



Phone Douglas 6762 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches ^ 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 

NOTICE ! BOSS OF ROAD OVERALLS 

PRICE, FROM 85 CENTS UP 

Phone Douglas 1737 



Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 190* 
257 HANSFORD BLDG., 268 MARKET STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
(examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 




„ UNION MADE FOR UNION MEN - 



H 
O 
E 

S 



PRICES 

58 THIRD ST., S. F. 



H 
O 



^ „ . , ( PERFECT FIT l? 

Our Specialties ] long 'wear H 

( ABSOLUTE COMFORT q 

THEY HAVE THE UNION LABEL O 



Silverware, Cut Glass and Clocks for Wedding 

Presents 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Qatnes^. Sorenserti 

At the Big Red Clock 
and the Chimes. 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock— Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 
FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



WHEN 

THE TOY SEASON 

OPENS 

Remember that, de- 
spite difficulties in ob- 
taining Toys equal to 
those of former years, 
the slogan that has 
made Hale's famous 
w^ill apply just as here- 
tofore. 




FOR TOYS 



Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING ® GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 

676 Third Street 

NEAR TOWNSEND, S. F. 



I want you 
Seamen 
to wear 

Union 
Hats 

$2.50, $3.50, 
$5.00 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 




Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BED SEAL CMAR CO.. MANUrACTUBCBS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Dougia* 1660 



CJBfrBDsrtn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



S 





ntrf/^-: 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
OfiBcial Paper of the International Seamen's Union of Amerfca. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXI, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1917. 



Whole No. 2455. 



AMERICA'S POP ULATI ON ANALYZED. 

Racial Problems of Our Country Discussed by Noted Writer 



Co-operative industrial organization presup- 
poses racial unity. There can be no co-opera- 
tion as long as there is racial strife and antag- 
onism within the nation. The American nation 
was formed — rather is being formed, since it 
is still in the formation period — by the com- 
mingling of the Anglo-Saxon, Teuton, Celt, Slav 
and Mediterranean. None of these races is in 
the majority or even in such a large minority 
that it could expect to have its character, its 
viewpoints, habits and temperament predomi- 
nate in the resultant race. 

The white population of the United States 
to-day probably comprises about 30 to 35 per 
cent, of Anglo-Saxon origin (English, Scotch, 
etc.), about 30 per cent, of Teuton origin (Ger- 
man, Dutch, Scandinavian, etc.), 15 per cent, of 
Celtic origin (Irish), and 20 to 25 per cent. 
Slav and Mediterranean. Of the latter, the 
latest immigrants, many are not yet citizens. 

The American race thus cannot be Anglo- 
Saxon, or Teuton, or Irish, or Slav, or Latin, 
but must have characteristics of all these races, 
and to talk about "blood is thicker than water" 
and apply this to "our British cousins," or 
speak of Germany as "fatherland," or of our 
country as a "greater Ireland." this is not 
.\merican citizenship, but is racial sectarianism, 
and as such to be condemned as reprehensible, 
since it retards the bringing about of the racial 
unity v^'hich is the first and fundamental re- 
quirement of a stable nation. 

On the other hand, it must be recognized that 
the Anglo-Saxon, or, more correctly speaking, 
the English, have an exceptional position in our 
race, as the original and oldest constituent. 

A Mixed Race in Formation. 

While all races contributed in the early col- 
onization of the Atlantic coast, nevertheless the 
British were so much in the majority that in 
the colonial days, and even still in the first part 
of the nineteenth century, the United States 
were essentially Anglo-Saxon, that is, the citi- 
zens of British descent were in the majority. 
But the great German and Irish immigration 
of the middle of the nineteenth century and the 
tendency of the descendants of the early col- 
onists toward race suicide changed this, and 
.America is not Anglo-Saxon any more, but is 
a mixed race in formation. 

The English language has conquered and 
through it the United States are closely related 
to England by a common language, common 
forms of expression and intercommunication, 
and a common literature, so much so that with 
many writers it is difficult to say whether they 
are British or American. In some respects it 
must, therefore, be regretted that the complete 
racial unity of the two English-speaking nations 
has not been preserved, that America has not 
remained completely of Anglo-Saxon race. 

On the other hand, however, it must be real- 
ized that it was the mixed races which have 
done the world's work, which have led in all 
human advance, and it was the vitality given 
by the mixture of races v/hich has created all 
freat nations. Thus England as a nation was 
formed by the mixture of the Norman and the 
.\nglo-Saxon; France by the Celt, Roman, and 



Frank; far back before history, tradition tells of 
the creation of the Roman nation by the tri- 
union of tribes — even the name "tribe" contains 
the root "three," in memory of this formation 
of the Roman nation from three branches. 

Thus there is no doubt that had it not been 
for the mixture of the various leading races of 
the world America would not be what it is to- 
day. We can easily realize this by reviewing 
the racial characteristics of the foremost races 
which contributed to the American union. 
Characteristics of the Anglo-Saxon. 

Tiie characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon is his 
great initiative. He is the empire builder. We 
only need to think of names like Hastings, 
Washington, Nelson, Gordon, Rhodes, Kitch- 
ener, etc. To him thus is due the push and 
the energy wliich have opened up and con- 
quered the New World. We see it in the rapid 
growth of the English colonies, compared with 
the slow growth of other nations' colonies. 

But characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon also 
is the excessive individualism which handicaps 
him in co-operation, and co-opjeration more and 
more becomes the essential of progress. Thus 
the Anglo-Saxons are not prominent as organ- 
izers, but rather are likely to be muddlers; the 
present world's war affords an excellent illus- 
tration hereof. Thus the Anglo-Saxon creates 
and originates, but does not organize what he 
created. 

The Teuton does not have the same initia- 
tive as the Anglo-Saxon; he also is an indi- 
vidualist — especially those of the Teuton races 
who emigrated here, because their individual- 
istic ideas did not conform to the governments 
under which they had lived in Europe — but the 
individualistic nature of the Teuton is tempered 
and controlled to a considerable extent by a 
collective or co-operative temperament. 

As a result, the Teutons, by their racial char- 
acteristics, are the great organizers. We only 
need, in the history of our nation, think of a 
few names as Astor, Goethals, Guggenheim, 
Harriman, Roosevelt, Schif?, .Schuster, Schwab, 
-Straus, Vanderbilt, Vanderlip, Warburg, Weyer- 
hausser, etc. 

Characteristics of the Celtic Race. 

Characteristic of the Celtic race is the strong 
collectivistic temperament, associated with an 
individualislic nature, which specially fits them 
as administrators. It is the Celt who is most 
proficient to rule as boss by the consent of the 
governed, not as disciplinarian by orders which 
his subordinates have to obey, but by giving 
the conception of "primus inter pares." Thus 
he has been most successful in politics, while 
(he individualistic Anglo-Saxon necessarily is 
ninch less successful in this activity. 

It is characteristic that America's largest city 
has been ruled almost uninterruptedly by the 
Celtic race, and that, in the rare instances where 
a "reform government" succeeded to carry New 
York, it was such a failure that it always was 
wiped out at the next election. Also, look 
around especially among these corporations 
which by their close relationship with large 
numbers of the public require a specially high 
grade of social sense in their management — 



public utility corporations — and you find an ab- 
normally large number of Irish names among 
their leaders. 

And how about the contribution to America 
by other races, outside of these three leading 
civilized races of to-day? Do not let us forget 
that the greatest of all Americans was neither 
-Anglo-Saxon nor Teuton; nay, was not even 
Aryan, but was of the Turanian race — Abe 
Lincoln. 

The three great races which contributed to 
the American citizenship of to-day are supple- 
mentary, commensal — originator, organizer, ad- 
ministrator — jointly they have made our com- 
nionwealth, and any split between them means 
disaster. The Anglo-Saxon alone, without the 
co-operation of the Celt and German, may orig- 
inate, but probably would not accomplish much 
more than a chaotic muddle — somewhat of this 
we have seen in the last year in our country. 

On the other hand, with the Teuton and Celt 
alone, without the Anglo-Saxon, progress would 
slow down for lack of initiative. 

There really never was a serious racial an- 
tagonism in our country. It is true, during the 
century of immigration the "native" has looked 
do\yn on the "Dutchy," he then in turn on the 
"Mike," and again on the "Dago," etc., but 
only the names were racial, the antagonism 
was not racial, but that of the previous immi- 
grant toward the lower standard of living of 
the later comer, who threatened the higher 
standard of living acquired by the former, and 
as quickly as the new immigrant acquired the 
.American standard of living and thereby ceased 
to be a danger in lowering the standard, the 
antagonism disappeared. 

Racial Hatreds Out of Place Here. 

Politically raci.il hatred has found an expres- 
sion only once in our country, in the notorious 
Know-Nothing party of a past generation; but, 
unfortunately, there is at present some danger 
of a revival of racial antagonism, and this 
would be a national calamity, as our nation 
needs the friendly co-operation of all the races 
which have contributed to the coming American 
race. 

Ml the nations wliich arc involved in the 
present world's war have contributed to the im- 
migration which has formed the American citi- 
zenship of to-day, and it is natural to expect, 
however much the immigrants and their de- 
scendants have become true Americans, that 
they should have some sentimental attachment 
or sympathy for the nation of their forefathers. 

Indeed, a type of mind whicli in one or two 
generations can lose all attachment for his an- 
cestors' nation is not the type of mind from 
which to build a strong and enduring nation, 
is not the type of mind which we want here 
in America; in England, after nearly a thou- 
sand years, the Norman and the Anglo-Saxon 
type are still distinguishable. 

Thus it is natural and proper that American 
"itizens of English origin should largely syni- 
liathize with England. American citizens of 
German extraction with Germany, American 
citizens of Irish descent wish England's defeat, 
etc. This has nothing to do with their duty as 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



American citizens, witli their allegiance first, last 
and always toward America. 

Unfortunately an American expatriate raised 
the cry of "hyphenate," and an influential press, 
misguided by business interests, took it up, and 
finally in the utterances of extremists — among 
them, unfortunately, some politically very prom- 
inent men — it reached the ultra Know-Nothing 
attitude that "only a citizen of British descent 
can be a real true American, and anybody not 
of Anglo-Saxon descent cannot have the type 
of mind which is required for an American 
citizen." 

With this it became a national menace, for 
it challenged the right to citizenship of the ma- 
jority of our nation, as the majority is not 
Anglo-Saxon any more. Naturally, all political 
diflferences, all issues between the various po- 
litical parties, became secondary in importance 
before the defense of the right to citizenship of 
the majority of our present citizens. As seen, 
it is a very dangerous and very unfortunate po- 
litical issue, vv'hich has been raised thus inad- 
vertently by politicians playing to temporary ex- 
citement of racial prejudice. 

Such vicious attempts of making political capi- 
tal by creating racial hatred within our nation 
should promptly be squashed by all fair-minded 
citizens. 

It is obvious that all Americans — with the 
exception, perhaps, of the red Indians — are 
hyphenates; that there are undoubtedly a few — 
a very few — British-Americans who are more 
Englishmen than Americans, German-Americans 
who are more Germans than Americans, etc., 
but that the overwhelming majority of all the 
British-Americans, German-Americans, Irish- 
Americans, etc., are Americans and nothing else. 

But some good features the raising of this 
issue has produced: it has shown the anachron- 
ism in many of our conceptions and forms of 
speech. We have been talking of the native- 
born Americans "assimilating" the immigrants. 
There can be no such thing; assimilation implies 
two parties becoming similar, but implies both 
changing. Thus the native does not assimilate 
the immigrant, but native and immigrant assim- 
ilate with each other, and the native as well as 
the immigrant changes, fortunately, for it would 
be a sad America if we still burned witches as 
the Puritan "natives" did, if we still had the 
blue laws and the religious intolerance of the 
old New Englanders. 

Or, we may say, "America assimilates all the 
immigrants coming to its shores into a new, 
American nation." But this nation is not like 
the Puritan or the Dutchman of New Amster- 
dam or the German of '48, but has, more or 
less, the characteristics of all of these. 

Thus, when wc speak of America as the melt- 
ing pot of the nations we must realize that in 
melting together different metals the alloy is not 
like any one of the metals put into the pot, 
and thus we must not expect that the product 
coming out of the melting pot of the nations 
will be in temperament and characteristic like 
the British-American, w'ill have the British view- 
point — or that of any otlier constituent nation — - 
however much this may disappoint us. 

Inversely, however, we must realize that the 
Anglo-Saxon strain is one of the largest in the 
composition of the American race; tliat his- 
torically, by the previous preponderance of the 
Anglo-Saxon, it has exerted more influence on 
the molding of the new nation than any other 
race, and that, therefore, at least for some time 
to come, Anglo-Saxon characteristics should be 
more prominent than those of any other race; 
but they cannot be predominant. — Charles P. 
Steinmetz, in "America and the New Epoch." 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



.\ristotlc once said that in order for 
slavery to disappear machines would have 
to be invented to do the work of men. 
He never dreamt of such machines exist- 
ing and the largest portion of the human 
race being enslaved to them for the bene- 
fit of only a very few, who not even are 
truly benefited as they are no longer the 
intellects of the world. lUit it is quite 
natural that the enslaved class should first 
have to learn the value and pay the 
price of liberty. "He who would be free 
must himself strike the blow." The ma- 
chine is here which Aristotle designated 
as the emancipator of mankind. It only 
remains for mankind to emancipate itself 
from it. Man has harnessed the elements 
to his will, let him now harness his will to 
control the giant he has called into life ! — 
niive ]\T. Johnson. 



The old slave master would not allow 
the slaves to be taught to read. The 
masters to-day care not how much the 
workers read so long as they furnish the 
reading matter. 



One day last week there walked into the 
office of Secretary Treasurer Davison, of 
the International Association of Machinists, 
an officer of the Engineer Corps of the 
.\rmy. He said that he wanted some 
skilled men for an engineer regiment which 
was to serve in France. 

Davison pulled out a sheaf of reports 
from lodge secretaries, and showed the 
Army officer that there had been drafted 
into the service, or voluntarily enlisted, 
many thousands of the best skilled me- 
chanics in the trade. The problem was not 
one of withdrawing more men froin war 
industries in this country, but of taking 
from ordinary field service, in the training 
camps all over the United States, enough 
men of each special class of skill to fill 
up the engineering organization. 

The Army officer was sur])risc(l and 
l)leased. It appeared that he had no very 
clear idea as to how the men he wanted 
could be found, and, even when found, how 
they could be brought to enlist. 

The Machinists' Official turned over to 
him, two days later, a list of sixty men now 
in the Army who are experts on the repair- 
ing of locomotives. Another lot were 
skilled in the making and repair of certain 
instruments. Another lot were accustomed 
to handling still another branch of metal 
work which this particular regiment will 
have to keep in order. The War Depart- 
ment will send for these men at their 
camps, and place them in the Engineer 
Corps. In France they will not be sent to 
the trenches, but will be placed in the ma- 
chine shops behind the lines, there to give 
their service where it will count the most. 

Davison stated to the Army officer that 
some of the Machinists' lodges in Middle 
Western towns had been actually wiped 
out by enlistment and conscription, and 
that it was probable that any further calls 
for skilled men inside the Army could be 
met as easily as was this one. 

Arrangements are now being made for 
the granting of something more than the 
ordinary soldier's pay to the best of the 
skilled mechanics in the Army Engineer 
Corps, by creating a large number of non- 
commissioned officers. 

* * * 

Secretary of Labor Wilson is leaving for 
the Southwest with Felix Frankfurter, sec- 
retary of his special commission, to inves- 
tigate the industrial war in the copper, 
lumber and other big indtistries in the 
Rocky, Inter-Mountain and Pacific Coast 
regions. The two labor members and the 
two members of the commission who will 
represent the employers, will join them on 
the way. 

John Murray — the man who knows more 
about labor problems along the Mexican 
border, and who has done more to help the 
Mexican wage workers in the border States 
and in Mexico than any other American — 
may not be able to take part in getting the 
facts before the commission. He was again 
stricken ill, just as he had triumphed in 
his long fight to get such a commission 
sent to Arizona, and hurried West to a 
dry climate. If he regains strength in the 
desert he will siill help the Arizona State 
Federation of Labor to present its case. If 
he remains too weak to do this, the burden 
will be shouldered bv labor officials on the 



sjK)!. Murray came East some months ago 
at the risk of his life, to try to save the 
Arizona labor movement from being utterly 
crushed out by the copper barons, aided 
by the big politicians of the State. He 
fought through every sort of indifference 
and discouragement and change of mind on 
the part of the men to whom he appealed, 
and it is due chiefly to his determination 
that the chance for a new lease of life for 
the union men in the copper camps is now 
assured. 

There is occasionally a union man of 
whom a word of appreciation ought to be 
said while he is alive. John Murray was 
one of the three or four Americans who 
contributed the most, and who risked life 
lightly and often, for the coming and the 
final success of the Mexican revolution. In 
the struggles of the coal miners in Colo- 
rado and the metal miners in Arizona he 
has not been wasted. 

* * * 

A conference on the housing of workers 
in the industrial centers where the rapid 
growth of war industries has led to over- 
crowding of houses and the use of tents, 
barns and sheds as sleeping quarters, was 
held in the offices of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, on Tuesday night. This 
meeting was called at the suggestion of the 
chairman of the Housing Stibcommittee of 
the Committee on Labor Welfare of the 
Council of National Defense. Its net result 
was the making of a request of the House 
and Senate conferees on the Deficiency 
Appropriation bill, that $100,000,000 be pro- 
vided for the building of homes for the 
workers now unable to rent them. 

This plan was suggested by Charles E. 
Whitaker, editor of the Journal of the 
American Institute of Architects. Whit- 
aker presented a complete plan for meet- 
ing the immediate shortage of 40,000 houses 
at the industrial centers east of Chicago. 
He proposed that the Government either 
finance the house-building schemes which 
war contractors might undertake for the 
neighborhood of their own plants, or pro- 
vide funds for groups of persons wanting 
to build houses for themselves — after the 
fashion of the farm loan law — or that the 
Government should itself buy land and 
build houses, which it would administer on 
its own account. This last plan is the one 
which England has adt)pted, after several 
years of experiments. 

The $100,000,000 will build about 40.000 
dwellings. Rut it is probable that if a 
United States Housing Administration is 
created by Congress, and if the Govern- 
ment shall decide to go into the building 
business with a view to having permanent 
and high-grade housing for workers in all 
industrial cities, the average cost of the 
houses will be increased. Whitaker believes 
that the Government can get better results, 
in the long run, by counting the cost of 
good housing as one of the elements in 
securing steady and first-class service on 
the part of its industrial employes. 



The average number of originating calls 
in the territory of the telephone companies 
of the Pacific Coast is 3,500,000 per day. 
In the bay area, including the cities and 
towns around San Francisco Bay, the same 
average is approximately L000,000 per day. 
In the City of San Francisco there is an 
average of 650,000 calls per day. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Are Women Delighted? 

A Philadelphia newspaper prints a first- 
page story, embellished with large pic- 
tures, of 200 women employed in the 
machine shops of the General Electric 
company. 

This is how the newspaper attempts to 
make the public forget its former preach- 
ments that "women's place is in the 
home :" 

"Already pretty girls and capable ma- 
trons are at work on the spacious floors 
of the General Electric company, operat- 
ing lathes, running the drill punches with 
a will, all of them neat and trim in the 
new masculine uniforms, all feminine in 
spite of the trousered legs. 

"Blue chambray is the chosen material ; 
little Dutch caps keep back flying hair 
from the whirring wheels ; white feet and 
ankles showing beneath the full gathered 
trousers complete the effect of the woman 
'there for business,' but still very much 
a woman." 

Company officials are quoted as saying 
that women will be employed entirely, 
"except for such machine work that is too 
heavy for any except a man." 

It is intended that the public will ac- 
cept new conditions because the women 
are pictured as being "perfectly delight- 
ed" with their new overalls. This uni- 
form, the newspaper assures us, "retains 
woman's femininity" in the greasy, thun- 
derous machine shop. 



Shipowner's Creed Is "Profit First." 
The United States Government is at- 
tempting to induce vessel owners to as- 
sist in the warfare against submarines. 
These ships are insured by the Govern- 
ment and the owner loses nothing if his 
vessel is sunk, while protective devices 
would bear additional cost to him, al- 
though this cost would mean a conserva- 
tion of transportation, which is so vital at 
this time for the triumph of democracy. 
The Washington Post is conducting an 
agitation against these unpatriotic vessel 
owners and in an editorial makes this sig- 
nificant statement : 

"When the management of one of the 
strong shipping concerns was asked by a 
Government official why his concern did 
not adopt the plans of the Naval Consult- 
ing Board for making ships unsinkablc, he 
replied: 'Because of the expense and also 
because it would reduce cargo-carrying 
capacity. It would be better to lose one 
transatlantic ship out of ten than to re- 
duce the cargo-carrying capacity so as to 
require five ships to carry what four arc 
now taking. It would not be economical. 
We must look out for profits first.' " 

To this statement, the Washington Post 
adds : 

"Profits first, not safety first, nor coun- 
try first! The Government can put a 
stop to this murderous and traitorous sac- 
rifice of life and war supplies by forcing 
shipowners to adopt protective devices. 
The nation must kill oflf the spirit that 
seeks to coin money out of American 
blood." 

The Post's denunciation is in line with 



President Wilson's public declaration, last 
July, in which he stated that because of 
excessive freight rates shipowners have 
"taken the most eft'ectivc means in their 
power to defeat the armies engaged against 
Germany." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



After- War Problems. 

The Daily PIcrald of Adelaide, South 
Australia, regrets that the committee of 
the Adelaide trades and Labor council has 
done nothing to prcjjare a scheme for deal- 
ing with industrial problems at the close 
of the war. The paper says that this 
shows a serious lack of appreciation in re- 
gard to the responsibility that all union- 
ists should shoulder. 

"The best method to adopt is, of course, 
the old one of organization," it is stated. 
"Never was it more necessary than it is 
now that every worker should be enrolled 
in a union. What should be discussed, 
however, is the best means for strengthen- 
ing union organization so that industrial 
control may be more complete and efifcct- 
ive. Such control is not required merely 
for defensive purposes. It would be use- 
ful as a means for suggesting improve- 
ments in the various branches of industry, 
so that the workers, as well as the public 
generally, might benefit by increased ef- 
ficiency all around. The idea of efficiency 
which aims at making the worker more of 
a machine-like unit than he now is must 
be combated. There can be no objection, 
however, to encouraging and accepting 
the kind of efficiency which aims at im- 
proving the individuality of mankind as a 
worker and a citizen able to produce the 
best products of his skill, and able at the 
same time to enjoy the highest fruits of 
those products." 

Admonished That the Law Has Teeth. 

A warning to the coal men of the 
country, operators and dealers, was issued 
by Senator Pomerene of Ohio, following 
a conference with Dr. H. A. Garfield, fuel 
administrator. Senator Pomerene declared 
he had received intimations that some coal 
men were not obeying the law and, fur- 
thermore, had announced an intention not 
to do so. He said: 

"If any of these operators feel that 
Congress passed the law fixing the price 
of food and fuel as a blufif, or that the 
executive department was not serious 
when the prices were fixed, they had bet- 
ter accept a word of friendly admonition. 
Prices at the mines and to be charged by 
jobbers were effective as of the day they 
were set by the President, and prices to be 
charged by retailers will be fixed in the 
very near future, and delivery of coal will 
likewise be provided. 

"The law has teeth in it. Severe i)enal- 
tics are provided for asking, demanding 
or receiving higher prices than those fixed, 
or for refusing to conform to regulations 
which the Government may make." 



If Tom Hood had lived in the Southern 
States he would probably have chosen the 
child worker as the theme of his "Song." 



International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
33Z West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange 
au.x-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodcrnes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tcnburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza .S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
heiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Socicdad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Caiiieros y Cocincros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

.Socicdad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
tcrra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
F>arao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Emprcgados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 

-Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers 



A regiment of 2400 negro steve- 
dores for foreign service has been 
autliorized by the War Department 
111 meet tlie needs of the American 
expeditionary force in France. 

The Toronto (Canada) Board of 
Conciliation having under consider- 
ation the dispute between the Street 
Carmen's Union and the company 
over a demand for an advance of 
10 cents an hour has rendered its 
decision. The finding grants the 
men si.x cents an hour increase 
and runs for two years, dating back 
to June 16. I'he rate fixed for motor- 
men, conductor.s, motor and track re- 
pairmen is 30 cents for the first si-x 
months, 32 for the second six 
montlis, 35 for the second year and 
37 for the third and subsequent years. 
Adding the two cents previously se- 
cured makes a total advance inside 
of a year of nine cents per hour. 

.\ representative of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad after waiting for more 
than a month and a half at San 
Juan, P. R., for word from his em- 
ployers has been ordered home. He 
received a cable that the company 
could not get the transportation it 
sought in order to take Porto Rican 
laborers to the United States, and 
he returned to Philadelphia. It is 
just as difficult to get ships to take 
women workers to the New Eng- 
land mills. The railroad company's 
agent had succeeded in obtaining the 
consent of the Bureau of Labor to 
hire all the men he wanted if he 
could furnish the proper transporta- 
tion to the United States. 

The ijresidcnt of the British Board 
of Trade was asked recently whether 
he could state the number of of- 
ficers and men of the merchant 
service killed during the present war, 
including officers and men who were 
on the Admiralty pay list serving in 
the Royal Naval Reserve or in any 
capacity in fleet auxiliaries, trans- 
ports, minesweepers, patrols, etc. Sir 
Albert Stanley replied as follows: 
The number of officers and seamen 
of the merchant service reported as 
having lost their lives on merchant 
vessels through enemy action from 
the beginning of the war to August 
18, 1917, is 6627. This figure does 
not include the loss of life of of- 
ficers and men on the Admiralty 
liay list, and I would refer my 
honorable friend to that department 
for information on that point. 

The annual conference of the Na- 
tional Brassworkers aand Metal Me- 
chanics was recently held at Bir- 
mingham, England, ^^r. VV. C. Mc- 
Stocker presided, and in his opening 
address he gave a gratifying ac- 
count of the progress of the society. 
Fourteen new branches had been 
opened, and the total membership 
now reached 17,792. During the year 
the aggregate wage advances se- 
cured amounted to £500,000, but 
even this advance had not been com- 
mensurate with the increased cost 
of living. Tn Birmingham, the brass- 
workers had all received the 12s. 
advance, which brought the rate up 
to 51s. since the beginning of the 
war. Referring to war bonuses, Mr. 
McStocker expressed himself strong- 
ly in favor of supporting any trade 
union movement for claiming to 
have bonuses considered as ordinary 
wages to meet the increased cost of 
living after the war. As a highly 
skilled trade, he maintained the 
brassworkers' wages should he 
amongst the highest in the land. 



THE UNION STORES OF THE U. S. A. 

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1118 MARKET STREET, Opposite 7th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

717 K Street, Sacramento 112-116 So. Spring Street, Los Angeles 



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California State Building Trades Council 



vWORKERS UNION 



UNIOf^STAMP 

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Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Worker.^' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



San Pedro Letter Limt. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BROWN &L SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florshoim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 
109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

122 Sixth Street, San Pedro 

PROPRIETORS OF 

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Manufacturers and Bottlers of All Flavors Union Bottler 



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531 Front Street 
Two Entrzmcei 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

5291/2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated in the sunny 
south is the ideal place. Captain Frerichs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. 
TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Street*. San Pedro, Gal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

L<>ii Angeles Examiner and All Ban 

rmnriaro Papers on Sale. A<rent» 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
San Pedro. Los Angeles Waterfront. Cal. 



The Aoglo-GaliMa Trust Companii 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 

offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in Ccilifornia 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS.. $ 1,910.000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 16,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



.\;^l>e. Theo 
.Vndersen. A. H. 
Anderson, Wilfcnvl 
Aalto, K. A. -l.'!41 
.Andersen, C. E. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andersen, Frank 

-332 
Button. R. S. 
Bower. Gosta 
Blomgren, M. A. 
Bentsen. Hans B. 
Beier, John C. 
Behrens, Fred 
Brown, Joe 
Bergesen, Slvert 
Brown, G. 
Brien, Hans 
Bentsen, Hans B. 
r.irlson, John 
Collins. Ed. 
Carlson, C. V. 
Christensen. A. 
Carlson, R. C. 
Carlson. Gustaf 
Christensen, B. 
Urasbeck, Carl 
Dougal, A. 
Ellison, Samuel 
Emmery. J. A. 
Enstrom, Carl 
Eklund, Swen 
Farrell. H. D. 
Folvig, John 
Fosberg, Leonard 
Gaeve. Willy 
Glcesler, E. 
Gcrhardt, John 
Gerard. Albert 
Hill, Chas. 
Holm.strom, F. 
Hansen, Bernard 
Hoek, A. 
Hunter, Ernest 
Hagger, F. W. 
Hedman, John M. 
Janssen, Hans E. 
Johnson, S. 
Jansson, H. E. 
Johansen, Algol 
Janssen, Bernh. 
Johanson, N. A. 
Johnson, Gunnar 
Johansen, Fred 
Jansson, Bernhard 
Kartheuser, Otto 
Kern back 
Klotz, Arnold 
Kipper, Henry 
Karre. M. V. 
Kristensen, Niels 
Kind, H. 
l.arsen, Sigvard 
Lyngquist, H. 
L.arsen, Martin 
Laakso, Frank 
Lassen, Johan 
Lorenz. Bruno 
Larsen, Lewy 



Larsen. L. 
Lund, J. TV'. M. 
T-abrentz. Max 
T>utzen, Valdemar 
Mutka, Anton 
Moller. Earl R. 
Moller, Christian 
Magnussen, Sigunl 
Marlon, J. 
Mamers. Carl 
Miller, R. E. 
Metz, John 
Minners, Hernjan 
Moberg. Karl G. 
N. P. -1504 
Olsen, Thomas 
Olsson, O. S. 
Olsen. Ole W. 
Pederson. Chris 
Pashe. John 
Fetter, G. 
Pylkan. William 
Pera, GustI 
Petersen. Olaf 
Peterson, K. E. 

-903 
Petersen, C. -1493 
Paulsen. James 
Pederson, John 
Peterson, Alfred 
Pedersen. Alf. -1323 
Palmquist, A. 
Peterson, Hugo 
Paterson, C. V. 
Petersen. N. -1231 
Rosenthal. Walter 
Reuter, Ernest 
Raaum, Harry 
Rivera, John 
Retal, Otto 
Raun, Einar 
Stolzernian. Emll 
Swanson. E. 
Sbedln. Hans 
Schroeder, Ernest 
Schlieman. F. 
Swartou, Charlie 
Ronneborn. Ben 
Swanson. Jam^s 
Relewski. Franz 
Schroeder. Alfred 
Selander, W. 
Taft, Jes 
Teague, Osrar 
Thygessen, John 
Thomas, Henry 
Thirup. C. 
Thompson, Maurice 
Thoren, G. A. 
Thompson. Alex 
Wolf. A. E. 
Wlig. Theo 
Walker. John 
Warkala. John 
Ysberg. Adolf 

Packages. 
Bluker, John 
Kruger. Wm. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



.\iiderson. Gust H. 
Bohm. Frank 
Brandt, Arvld 
Bohni, Franz 
Carlson, Chas. B. 
Cariera. Peter 
Dully, Alexander 
Elliot. Austin E. 
Fisher. Fritz 
Guidersen, E. 
Gregory, W. 
Geiger, Joe 
Harding, Ellis 
l-(ylander. Gust 
Hartman, Fritz 
Irmey. Fred 
Jorgensen, Robert 
Jones, H. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
Johnson, Karl 
Jensen, H. T. 
Kaskinen. Albert 
Kristensen, Wni. 
Kroon. Al. 
Kelly. Wm. 
Knofsky, E. W. 
Laatzen. Hugo 
Larsen. Hans 



Mltchel. J. W. 
Mehrtens, H. 
Nlelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, A. S. 
Olson, David 
Okvist, Gust 
Ogiive, Wm. 
Paulson. Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Paul, George 
Peterson, M. 
Palmqvist, Albert 
Petersen, Anton 

-1675 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rasmussen, O. 
Rubins. Carl A. 
Samuelson, Sam 
Stiiiesson. Harold 
Siebert, Gust 
Swanson. Oskar 
Swanson. John L. 
Tuhkanen. Johan J. 
Westengren. C. W. 
Wagner, W. M. 
Welllnger. L. 
Warren, Geo. 
Willing. Wm. 



Aberdeen, Wath., Letter List. 



Anderson, Chris. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andeson, A. P. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Berdwlnen, Bob 
Bohm, Gust 
Browen. Alexander 
Brogard. N. 
Brun, Mattia 
Brant. Max 
Carlson, Adolph M. 
Crentz, F. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Ditrlch 
Christensen, Louis 
Davis. Frank A. 
Donaldson. Harry 
Ekman. Gust 
Elllngsen, Erllng 
Fattinger, August 
Fisher, Charley 
Frohne. Robert 
Gerard, Albert 
Grant, August 
Gray. William 
Gronlund, Oskar 
Gro"'-os, Oswald 

-411 

Gueno, PIte 
I Gran. Axel 

Grag, William 

Hansen, Thorlelf 

.Hansen, JacK 
' Hansen, Max Owe 
, Harley. Alex 
i High. Edward 
'■ Holmroos. AUn 
I Hedrlck, Jack 
I Jensen, L. 
I Johansson, Arvo 
I Jobanssen .John F. 

Johnsen, Carl 



Johnson, Hans 
Johnson, Hihnar 
Kessa, Theo. 
Kord, Hjalmar 
Kreander, Wlctor 
Kuldsen, John 
LIgoski, Joe 
Lohtonen, Arthur 
Longren, Charley 
Malkoff, Peter 
Meiners, Herman 
Meyers, George 
Nelson, Aug. 
Newman, I. 
Nielsen, Alf. W. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nilsen, Harry 
Olsen, Alf. 
Olsson, C. 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Peterson, 
Pettersen, 
Rahfl, J. 
Risenlus, Sven 
Rnsenblad, Otto 
Sandqulst. Gunnar 
Semlth. Ed. 
Schenk, Albert 
Shemwall, Sigurd 
Sckultz, Bernt. 
Thorn, Alek. 
Thnrnland. John 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Waales, Edgar 
Wagner. Ed. 
Wedequlst. Axel 
Williams. T. C. 
Williams. John 
Wolf. R. G. 

Package*. 
Ellingsen. Erllng 



Nels 
Carl 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



I 



A new line to Guayaquil has been organized at 
San Francisco, called "The South American Pa- 
cific l.ine," with live vessels. The steamers, with 
their carrying capacity, are: "Governor Forbes," 
2520 tons; "Baja California," 2700 tons; "Sinaloa," 
2700 tons; "Regulus," 6000 tons; and "Romulus," 
6000 tons; all under the Norwegian flag. The 
vessels are owned in Christiania. 

Contracting for a ferry launch to be operated 
by one man, the Seattle Port Commission, on 
taking over the craft, found that she was ten 
tons larger than they had planned, and needed 
the services of three men, according to Gov- 
ernment regulations. The route selected will 
not justify the success, so the Commission has 
tied up the new craft indefinitely. 

Plots of land in the Panama Canal Zone have 
been assigned to the Central and South Amer- 
ican Telegraph Company for the construction of 
an office building and of quarters for the em- 
ployes of the company. The office is to be sit- 
uated on the new road to Gavilan Island from 
East Balboa, and the quarters are to be on the 
Zone line road, to the south of the present 
limits of building in Ancon, below the old Ad- 
ministration Building. 

Whether the channel in front of the Eureka 
Avater front wall be dredged this fall depends on 
the decision of ColonJ W. H. Heucr, in charge 
of United States engineering work on the Coast, 
according to George F. Whittemore, engineer in 
charge of the local jetty construction, who will 
close operations at Eureka for the duration of 
the war within three weeks. The north jetty is 
seven-eighths completed as to length, and three- 
fourths of the tonnage of rock necessary to 
complete the project has been placed. 

Captain T. P. H. Whitelaw was the only bid- 
der on the Government's offer to share profits 
on recovered buoy moorings, and Washington's 
approval of his bid is expected shortly. When 
this arrives the captain will immediately send 
the steamer "Greenwood" on an extended hunt 
along the Coast of California in the hope of 
finding some of the hundred or more buoy 
moorings that have been lost in recent years. 
The moorings, including their chains, are worth 
about $1000 each in the present markets. 

The schooner "Irmgard," which was badly 
damaged by the typhoon in the China Sea in 
.August and was towed into Keelong, Formosa, 
by the transport "Thomas," is being repaired at 
Shanghai preparatory to resuming her voyage 
from Manila to this port. ♦ The schooner was 
towed from Keelong to Shanghai for the re- 
ported figure of $5000. It is expected a large 
sum will have to be expended in putting the 
"Irmgard" into sailing condition. The cargo of 
copra and lumber was discharged at Keelong. 

Announcement that three more keels for 
steamers will be laid in December, when his 
firm takes over the Bendixsen shipyard prop- 
erty, was made at Eureka by John D. Stelling, 
\ice-president of the Rolph Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, who is here for ten days on inspection. 
The three steamers and one barkentine now 
building are completely in frame, and planking 
is being started. The first of these keels was 
laid down early in July. A hospital where first 
aid to any men injured at the plant will be ad- 
ministered will be constructed immediately. 

Two more steamers under control of the 
Shipping Board have been turned over to 
Williams, Dimond & Co., to load for the At- 
lantic— the "Setos" and "Pomern " This makes 
six vessels all told now that this company is 
loading for the Atlantic, the other four being 
the "Montpelier," "Elsass," "Monticello" and 
"Gouv. Jaeschke." New boilers have been put 
in the "Pomern" and, with a complete over- 
hauling, she is piactically a new ship. She was 
towed to this port last June from Honolulu 
after being seized by the Government. The 
"Setos" was towed here from the islands in 
May. 

The British steamer "War Sailor," which ar- 
rived at Seattle recently from Japan, is one of 
a fleet of twenty-three big carriers with a total 
.gross tonnage of approximately 200,000 tons, 
ordered by British interests from Japanese ship- 
building companies. Two of the vessels are 
already in commission and others will shortly 
be ready for service. The orders for this great 
fleet of British freighters were placed with the 
Kawasaki Dockyard Company, the Mitsu Bishi 
Engine and Iron Works, the Asano Shipbuilding 
Companv, the Urago Dock Company, and other 
shiplniilding yards in Japan. The "War Sailor" 
is a vesscfl of 10,000 tons. 

On account of the scarcity of tonnage in 
the deep-water carrying trade, a shipping firm 
in the East has purchased the old English con- 
vict ship "Success," which was a feature at the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition, and plans to turn 
her into a cargo packet. The old craft, which 
was built more than eighty years ago, is now at 
T.ouisvillc, Ky., having been towed up the 
Ohio River from the South, where she has been 
since leaving San Francisco. With the cells 
removed, it is expected the ship can carry about 
750,000 feet of lumber. The "Success" is one 
of the few vessels in the world made of solid 
teak, and her hull is said to be wonderfully well 
preserved. 



The Parr-McCormick Steamship Company, 
which has taken over the Hollywood Ship- 
building Company, announced that the company 
would construct four 8500-ton steamships for 
the Government at a cost of $1,500,000 each. 
The company has options on building two ad- 
ditional ships. The ships will be built at the 
Oakland estuary plant. Theodore Brent of 
New Orleans, who resigned as vice-chairman of 
the Federal Shipping Board several weeks ago, 
has become associated with the Parr-McCor- 
mick Company, and will have special supervi- 
sion over the building of the big vessels. Brent 
has had wide experience in ship matters. David 
Hollywood is general manager and Fred D. 
Parr chairman of the executive committee of 
the shipbuilding corporation. 

In the first few weeks of Panama Canal op- 
erations the necessary measurements, which had 
to be made at the Canal for the issuance or 
verification of the certificates of measurement 
of ships, caused occasionally as much as a day's 
delay to some of the ships. This was due to 
the great proportion of ships arriving without 
certificates, and of corrections needed on cer- 
tificates made out prior to arrival. The sailing 
directions state that as high as 36 hours' delay 
may be met on account of measuring. At pres- 
ent, on account of the large number of return- 
ing ships, previously certificated, and the abil- 
ity of the admeasurers to determine the Canal 
tonnage and the equivalent under United States 
rules largely from the ships' registry certificates, 
ships are practically never delayed for measure- 
ments. Even when measurements have to be 
made extensively the ships are measured while 
in transit through the Canal. 

Captain J. H. Bennett and C. W. Cook left 
San Francisco for Washington during the week 
to take part in a conference with Government 
officials as to the advisability of foreign vessels 
being allowed to engage in the coastwise trade 
of the United States. Captain Robert Dollar 
has gone to Washington on the same mission. 
It has been suggested in various quarters that 
.American ships withdrawn from the coastwise 
trade for ofTshore use by the Government might 
be supplanted temporarily by foreign vessels in 
order to handle all the freight. Shipping men 
here seem to be divided in opinion as to al- 
lowing the foreign ships to ply along the coast 
and to Honolulu. Some steamship officials say 
that the temporary expedient might become a 
permanent institution, thus injuring American 
interests. Others say more coastwise ships are 
needed at once and that bringing foreign ves- 
sels into use is the only way out of the diffi- 
culty. 

German commerce raiders, manned by the 
crew of the famous "Seeadler," which, it now 
develops, stranded on Mopeha Island, in the 
South Pacific, after roaming the seas for seven 
months, preying on American and allied ship- 
ping, are operating somewhere in the South 
Seas, according to a report received at the 
Navy Department from the commander of the 
naval station at Tutuila, Samoan Islands. The 
dispatch, transmitting the story of Captain 
Hador Smith of the American schooner "C. 
Slade," one of the "Seeadler's" victims, was 
sent on September 29, several weeks after the 
two new raiders left Mopeha Island, where they 
had been captured by the Germans. The first 
put to sea on August 21 and the other on Sep- 
tember 5, and it probably was their operations 
which led to recent reports of raiders in the 
Pacific. Before coming to grief on August 2, 
the "Seeadler" had added the American schoon- 
ers "A. B. Johnson," "Manila" and "Slade" to 
the list of at least twelve allied vessels which 
she sank early this year in the South Atlantic 
Ocean. In the long period from last March, 
when she was last heard from, the raider prob- 
ably sent down other craft encountered in pass- 
ing through the Atlantic, around Cape Horn 
and across the Pacific to the Society group of 
French islands, of which Mopeha is one. The 
dispatch from the naval officer did not indicate 
the size of the raiders, and nothing is known 
of them, as one was unnamed, while the French 
schooner "I-utece" is not listed in available 
shipping records. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sut- 
ter 5807. (Advt.) 



"Silas B. Axtell (attorney for Seamen's Unions 
in New York), formerly attorney for The Legal 
Aid Society, announces that he has opened an 
office for the practice of law and for the ex- 
clusive use of seamen. Consultation and advice 
free of charge. Suits under the La Follette Act 
for half wages; actions for damages for injuries 
on account of accident, etc., given prompt atten- 
tion." (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 
FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA Pa WALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JOHN BERG, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHRODER. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY 12 South Street 

Telephone 2107 Broad 

New Yorlt Branch 514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass 6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La 228 Lafayette Street 

BALTIMORE. Md 806 South Broadway 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 206 Moravian Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 231 Dock Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 220 Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass 168 Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 54 Commercial Place 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wickenden Street 

NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 

GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolph Street 

Telephone Franklin 278 

Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

1'elephone South 240. 

.\SHTABLrLA, 47 Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT. Mirh 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

CONNEAUT. 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



(Continued on Page 114 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



c 


oast 


Seamen' 


8 Journal 




Published weekly at S 


an Francisco 






BY THE 






SAILORS 


UNION OF 


THE 


PACIFIC 






Established in 


1887 





VAVl. SCIIAKRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOI/r Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - - JI.OO 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Change.s In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To in.sure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
riusiness Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the .fOTRNAl,, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, logilile. written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .lOURNAI. is nnt responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDXi'-SDAY, OCTOBER 10, lOi; 



STEEL TRUST DEFIANCE. 



Ilavintf repeatedly declined to meet witli 
the repre.sentatives of organized seamen and 
arrive at a basis for co-operation during war 
times, at least, the leading lights of the 
Lake Carriers' Association (controlled by 
the steel trust) were finally practically com- 
pelled to attend a conference at Washington 
in order to avoid a general tie-up of shipping 
on the Great Lakes. 

The conference between steel trust rejire- 
sentatives and organized seamen which finally 
took place on September 28 in the rooms of 
the U. S. Shipping Board at Washington, 
D. C, will go down in the annals of history 
as a memorable gathering. However, there 
is no occasion for rejoicing. It is true, the 
full increa.se in wages demanded by Lakes 
seamen's and firemen's unions was granted. 
But the (|uestion of abolishing the infamous 
"Welfare plan" is still undecided. 

It is said the steel trust representatives 
have graciously consented to abolish the dis- 
charge book by means of which they ]iut into 
effect their black list. Other matters, .such 
as overtime pay and the establi.shment of 
grievance boards, are also to be taken up 
and, in general, it has been promised that 
the recommendations of the Shipping Board 
made after a "fair investigation" will be 
accepted by the Lake Carriers' Association, 
r.ut the point at issue is that the gentlemen 
who dominate the steel trust's Lakes tonnage 
were not willing to do anything whatsoever 
to remedy existing grievances until virtually 
forced right up to a strike. Under the cir- 
cumstances it is difficult to believe that they 
are now acting in good faith or that they 
have now suddenly decided to be reasonable 
for patriotic reasons. 

The developments on the Great Lakes dur- 
ing the next few weeks will be watched with 
intense interest by Anurican seamen every 
where. 

The atmosi)here of democracy, both in the 
life of nations and in the industrial world. 



is now spreading as never before and it is 
time that the steel magnates and their man- 
agers should catch its spirit and reach the 
conclusion that the day of autocratic rule 
in industry is not in accord with the age in 
which all the world is struggling for a higher 
plane of living. And it is to be sincerely 
hoped that the widely advertised efforts of 
the steel trust management to bribe their 
working men to renounce unionism through 
stock allotments, and bonuses, and welfare 
schemes, have not succeeded. If there is to 
be paternalism in our country it ought to be 
at the hands of the Government and not by 
corporation managers whose alleged benevo- 
lences are only means to bind the workers 
to conditions that are subversive of their 
rights and of their liberty in determining 
wages and conditions of employment. 



ECONOMIC INQUIRY. 



The Commission recently appointed by 
President Wilson to investigate labor trou- 
bles on the Pacific Coast and the Western 
Alountain States has commenced its work in 
Arizona. This surely is a happy selection of 
location for a beginning; for now we may 
hope to obtain some genuine news about the 
management and conduct of those bogus 
loyalty leagues whose one great aim appears 
to be the crushing of unionism in Arizona. 

Later, the Commission is to look into the 
situation at San Francisco and also give some 
time to labor troubles in the lumber industry 
of the West. From time to time there will 
be reports made and it is possible that the 
final report will be printed for public use. 
Without in any way attempting to criticize 
the work of the Commission in advance of 
the work about to be taken up, it slunild be 
said that much valuable time has been wasted 
and little that is practically helpful has been 
derived from past economic inquiry in tin- 
United States and Canada. As a result, it 
is much more difficult now than formerly to 
enlist public attention on either side of the 
line in behalf of such investigations. 

The trouble has been that after all the in- 
formation and evidence and advice are gath- 
ered the whole is usually printed on thin 
paper in solid type and long paragraphs and 
bound in traditional "pub. doc." fashion. 
Thus, the thought, time and energy given the 
inquiry, as well as the expenditure it occa- 
sions, is largely thrown away. 

A great part .of all the economic wisdom 
of the ages is already securely locked up in 
this fashion. Investigators in economics, as 
a rule, have yet to learn that the art of pre- 
senting facts attractively is of no less im- 
portance to public welfare than the talent 
and labor employed in collecting them. It is 
reported that the Commission just appointed 
by the IVesident is going to do something 
practical with the data it collects. While we 
are willing to believe this, let us venture to 
say in a general way that if economic com- 
mittees and commissions in the United States 
and elsewhere do not in the future make bet- 
ter use of the facts they collect than similar 
bodies have made in the past, so far as any 
practical results are concerned, the time they 
give to inquiries and investigations will be 
time wasted. What economic investigating 
bodies arc greatly in need f)f, if we may be 
]ifrmitted t<> say it, is the assistance of per- 
sons trained in the art of so ]>resenling facts 
that the people for whom they are intended 
will read them. 



THE RIGHT TO DISCHARGE. 



An interesting decision, relating to the 
master's right to discharge a seaman when 
away from the home port, has just been 
rendered by Federal Judge Neterer at Seattle. 

Oscar For.strom, a seaman, brought an ac- 
tion against the Alaska Steamshij) Company 
to recover damages for breach of contract, 
he having signed articles on the steamship 
"V^aldez" for a round trip from Seattle to 
Southeastern Alaska and return. Forstrom 
was discharged in Juneau about November 
16, 1916, on the ground that he had dis- 
obeyed the direction of the mate, and fur- 
thermore, that he was intoxicated while on 
duty. 

The matter came up for hearing before 
the United States Commissioner at .Seattle, 
who made findings of fact adverse to the in- 
terests of Forstrom. From these findings 
Forstrom appealed to the L^nited States Dis- 
trict Court of the Western District of Wash- 
ington, Northern Division, Judge Neterer sit- 
ting on the bench. The Judge overruled the 
findings of the Commissioner and granted a 
judgment to Forstrom for the amount of his 
wage for the round trip, together with his 
transportation and for sums expended for 
board and room during the interval that he 
was discharged and up to the time that the 
vessel arrived in Seattle. 

This was a decided victory for I'orstrom. 
as the evidence was rather strong in behalf 
of the Steamship Company, who exerted 
every means to defeat the claim for the rea- 
son that it would serve as a bad example to 
their employes. The Court held that even 
though Forstrom might have been disobe- 
dient, the fact had been established that he 
returned to work after the altercation between 
himself and the mate. This, in the judginent 
of the Court, entitled Forstrom to go on with 
his employment and to complete the voyage. 
Forstrom's attorney was Mr. E. L. Wienir 
of Seattle, Wash. 

The theory behind this judicial decision is 
that a seaman may be (and should be) fined 
for disobeying orders, but that he cannot be 
discharged for .such an offense until the end 
of the voyage. 



.\n extraordinary incident of saving a 
"man overboard" during a dark night and 
in a gale of wind took place on the steamer 
"Leliua" while about half way on her trip 
from Dutch Harbor to San Francisco. By 
luck or a "regular" freak of chance the 
man in the water managed to come in con- 
tact with the log line and slowly slide to the 
end. Fortunately, his going overboard had 
been observed. So the engines were promptly 
stopped and a man detailed to haul in the 
log line to prevent her fouling the propeller. 
.'\fter a tug or two at the line and a few 
lusty shouts from the end, everybody on deck 
knew what had happened and the fortunate 
candidate for an almost certain and untimely 
death was safely landed on deck. The name 
of the lucky man is L. M. Andreassen, a 
member of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 



"Progress, the growth of ])owcr, is the 
end and boon of liberty, and without this 
a people may have the name but want the 
substance and spirit of freedom,"— Chan- 
iiing. 



Show ytnir patriotism by contributing to 
the .\nierican Red Cross Fund. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE AUSTRALIAN STRIKE. 



The big strike of New South ^^'ales work- 
ers against the introduction of the so-called 
"Taylor system" or the "American speed-u[) 
system" in the Government-owned railroad 
shops seems to have settled down to genuine 
test of endurance. As the weeks passed by, 
thousands of organized workers, including 
seamen and longshoremen, who were not 
directly concerned with the original point of 
contention, have come out on a sympathetic 
strike. According to the latest available in- 
formation the two sides to the dispute may 
be summarized as follows : 

The Government ofificials say : 

We have no desire to speed up. Wc only 
seek to attack the shirkers. We must know 
the time and cost of every job. 

We think the card system right, but it may 
be wrong, and so we are willing to let the mat- 
ter be decided by an independent tribunal. 

This independent inquiry should take place 
three months after the men have gone to work 
on the card system. 

The spokesmen for the workers make 

these points : 

We are opposed to speeding-up. We have 
no desire to defend the shirkers. 

We have no desire to oppose recording the 
time and cost of every job. 

We think the card system wrong. It may be 
right, and wc are prepared to abide by the de- 
cision of an independent inquiry. 

The independent inquiry should take place at 
once. 

It is self-evident that the real dififerencc 
between the two contentions is very slight, 
indeed. Obviously, there must be other, pre- 
sumably hidden, reasons for this prolonged 
industrial strife in a country blessed ( ?) with 
a .system of compulsory arbitration. Differ- 
ent men will arrive at different conclusions, 
but to a discerning reader of the Australian 
labor press it would appear as if utter lack 
of confidence and distrust of the new coali- 
tion government, now in power, will furnish 
the principal reasons (1) for bringing on 
the strike, and (2) for keei)ing it up for 
such a long period while the country is at 
war. 



The reappointment by President Wilson of 
James H. Barry as Naval Officer of the Port 
of San Francisco is worthy of a brief note. 
Throughout his long and useful life "Jim" 
Barry has been a stanch, true and loyal friend 
of the organized seamen. And, of course, 
for anyone knowing I\Ir. Barry that is 
"enough said." For when "Jim" or "Com- 
modore" Barry is a friend to a fellow or to 
a union of fellows he is a real friend, a 
friend who will "stand up" under any variety 
of pressure. Here's to the "Commodore" ! 



The merit of a labor paper is proved more 
by the amount of matter stolen from its col- 
umns than by the amount that is reprinted 
with credit. As imitation is the sincerest 
form of flattery, so literal appropriation is 
the strongest admission of worth. 



If the intellect were as highly developed 
as is the instinct we would seldomer witness 
the absurdity of the working class seeking its 
pabulum in the columns of the daily press. 



Every new labor paper established is a 
new outpost of the workers' army, a guidon 
planted nearer the goal. 



'I"he labor press is the only remaining fr<.e 
])ress. 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 

Stenographic Report of the Recent Washington 

Conference Between Shipowners and 

Seamen (Fourth Serial). 



Beware of bogus "union" labels! 



Statement by Captain Irving L. Evans (Cont'd). 

Reference was made to letting down of the 
bars to aliens, either Allies or neutrals. That 
was not done by the Shipping Board. I might 
say, as has been suggested by the Secretary of 
Commerce, that it is only for the period of the 
war. The United States Merchant Marine is 
something which is coming to stay, I hope. 
The United States is not going into this big 
proposition for the period of the war only. 
We should have men who are qualified when 
the war is over and the period is passed during 
which these aliens may serve on our ships that 
we can man those vessels with American sea- 
men, American licensed officers who are taken 
today and during the war and made officers of 
by training in the Shipping Board's school. 
In other words, the members of these organiza- 
tions which are represented here are being 
trained by the Government today for service 
immediately, if they can fill the places, and for 
the period after the war. It is not for the 
period of the war only, therefore, that we have 
to consider, and it is that which should inter- 
est a man; it is that in which we want your 
expression. We want you to send sailors which 
belong to your organizations, the oilers and the 
firemen which belong to your organizations 
into these schools that they may get the benefit 
of this free training which is being given by 
the Government. The engineers, the masters 
and mates, by taking these men we have and 
making good sailors of them, so that when the 
war is over the steamship companies may say, 
"We want our ships manned with American 
men, men who are second to none in the 
United States or in the world." 

The seamen of today — and in that include all 
departments — are trained and put upon these 
ships, they will be capital officer? when that 
time comes. 

As to the qualifications, a little further, for 
admission to the schools, I now say that wc 
have had thousands of applications. Thisisnot 
a school for slackers and adventurers — it is a 
school for the American sailor. We are not 
looking for the "fair weather" sailors; we are 
looking for men who can go to sea and sail 
a ship and stand a watch and do a credit to 
his ship and to the Government. We have 
had applications from thousands of yacht clubs 
and yachtsmen. Many of them are good fair 
weather sailors; a few of them may be good 
rough weather sailors, but very few. In other 
words, we are seeking to get the men who 
have been tried and proven true, who have 
been tested. Those are the men we want in 
these schools. To show the gentleman, Mr. 
Gibson, I believe it was, how limited the class 
is from which we may draw: Even the sailor 
on the Great Lakes, no matter how long the 
period he may have served, under the rules 
and regulations of the steamboat inspection 
service he is not qualified to take an examina- 
tion for ocean service in any other capacity. 
The steersmen who have served three or four 
or five years on the Great Lakes, whether 
vessels are meeting every few minutes in the 
rivers, where the navigation is as close and 
difficult as anywhere in the world, that wheels- 
man is not qualified to take an examination to 
become an officer on a deep water ship. The 
fisherman on a coasting steamer who has served 
three years is qualified. I have sailed on salt 
water and on fresh. My early life was spent 
on the salt water. I went to the Lakes and 
there commanded a ship for four years. I 
know both services, and all of you men know 
what my respect would be for the salt water 
sailor, because I have sailed there. I was 
brought up there in the square rigged sailing 
ship. But I know the Lake sailor as well, 
and I will say, gentlemen, that he would be 
a credit to the salt water service when he has 
had a very short period of experience, sufficient 
to acquaint him with the customs and the 
practice there. There is no better, whether 
he be an engineer or a navigator. True, his 
navigation on the Great Lakes is far different, 
but as a watch officer there are no better than 
those on the Great Lakes. We are not seek- 
ing men from the Great Lakes or from any 
local territory; we are seeking men from the 
whole United States. We want them all; we 
want every one of them who is ready, and 
who wants to enter these schools to come in 
and get the training. As soon _as_ the Shipping 
Board census is completed, if it is found that, 
as has been suggested here, that there is no 
shortage of officers, but a large surplus, one 
I hat will meet future demands, I assure you 
that the Shipping Board docs not care to go 
ahead spending money educating these men for 
a useless purpose. The Shipping Board is con- 
vinced that there is a shortage. Just what the 
source of information is T am not advised. My 
(■(inni'ction with the service has been principally 
with (he cstablishnicnt and getting started of 
tlii'se training schools, and a large innnber of 
those, I might say, have alrcad> been established. 
The attendance is increasing. The applicants 
lor admission to those schools gives you an 

(Continued on Page 8.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Gal., Oct. 8, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 p. 
m., Joe Faltus presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping good. Quarterly Finance Committee 
reported having examined the Union's accounts 
for the past quarter and found same correct. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 1, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

WILLIAM HASTINGS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 1, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping good. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL. Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
.Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 
JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 

San Pedro Agency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
-Shipping medium. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128'/^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu .A-gency, Sept. 24, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

JACK EDVVARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 4, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eu.gene Burke in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping fair-on all vessels. Nom- 
ination of officers for the ensuing term and 
delegates to the International Seamen's Union 
Convention were proceeded with. 

EUGENE STEIDLE. Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 27, 1917. 
.\'o meeting. Shipping good; members scarce. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 26, 1917. 
No meeting. .Shipping slow. Few arrivals of 
Inniber x'esscls; many members ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
Sepulveda Bldg., USjA 6th St. Phone Home 
115, Sunset 335. 



Portland .\gency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
X'o meeting. .Shipping medium; no members 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



The bark ".St. Katherine," whicli was wrecked 
last May at the mouth of the Ugashik River, 
near Bristol Bay, was towed into San Francisco 
Bay during the past week by the steamship 
"Port Angeles." The vessel was floated in 
August, with the cargo iiUact. She was on the 
way to llie canneries when she went aground 
in a slorm that also wrecked the shij) "Stand- 
ard" and the shij) "St. I'Vancis." The "St. Kath- 
erine" brought a cargo of canned salmon. 'I'he 
vessel is owned by Frank P. Peterson. .She 
will be put into sailing condition at a local 
shipyard. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 

(Continued from Page 7.1 



idea of what the situation is with relation to 
engineers. We have hundreds of applications 
from engineers holding licenses, some for tin- 
lower grades, some for the higher, but thf 
majority of those men today are filling i)osi- 
tions in large power houses and other station- 
ary plants. They say, "'We are ready to go 
if you want us." 

Now, gentlemen, we cannot take all of those 
men. Some of them hold positions where their 
services are practically indispensable, both to the 
Government and the business in which they arc 
engaged. That is particularly true of the en- 
gineers, the marine steam engineer, who is to-day 
found in every factory and every big pow'er 
house plant of any importance that you can 
name, and a great many of those men to be 
taken away from their present occupations. In 
that connection, I might say that you gentle- 
men, with your organizations, may be of great 
assistance to us in this census. W'c are trying 
to get the present address and occupation of 
every licensed officer, whether he be ingineer or 
navigator. We will not get them all. Through 
your assistance we will be able to get hold of 
some of these men, and as soon as that census 
is completed, as far as we can go, we shall per- 
haps call upon you to assist us in locating men 
whom we have a record of in the way of li- 
cense, but no knowledge as to their present 
whereabouts. In that respect, I say, we will 
probably need and ask your cooperation. The 
schools which have been established begin down 
on the coast of Maine and extend around by 
way of the Gulf of Mexico and north along the 
Pacific Coast to Seattle. There are thirty 
schools in which engineering is taught. I will 
not take up the time to name all the places, 
unless it seems to be of sufficient interest, 
where these schools are established. But this I 
want to impress upon you, that we are not seek- 
ing to bring into the service a lot of inex- 
perienced men, but are trying to promote the 
men who are already in. I am confident on the 
information I have obtained thus far that there 
will be a shortage of men, particularly in the 
lower grades, and I therefore ask that you men 
cooperate with us in getting into these schools 
American men, American citizens who can be 
trained to fill the positions in this new mer- 
chant marine and on the ships which have been 
taken over and arc being put under the Ameri- 
can flag by the Shipping Board. I thank you. 
(.Applause.) 

Address by Secretary Wilson. 

Secretary Wilson: The Secretary of Com- 
merce and myself have engagements in a very 
few minutes from now with other conferences 
that we have arranged. I do not know how it 
is with Mr. Rcdfield, but my own cnga.gements 
will carry me through from 4:30 until midnight, 
so that I will not have an opportimity of meet- 
ing further with you to-day after that time. 

In calling the meeting to order, I stated the 
purpose of it as clearly as I was capable of, 
l)Ut made no suggestions as to a possible line 
of policy. I want to take the time norw, if I 
may, to make some suggestions. They may be 
worth your consideration or your mind. You 
will be better able to judge after you have heard 
them. I feel that the great bulk of our people 
are patriotic, that they are behind the Govern- 
ment in this great conquest, no matter what 
position in life they may occupy. 1 feel it 
deep down in my heart that in the shipping in- 
dustry, from the president of the shipping cor- 
porations to the cabin boy, from the master of 
the ship to the sailor, from the chief engineer 
to the coal passer, they are all ready to go witli 
Gibson. (Applause and laughter.) This con- 
ference has not been called because there is any 
doubt in our minds as to their patriotism, but 
because we felt that there would be more 
solidarity in the movement with Gibson if we 
could get the president and the cabin boy. the 
master and the sailor, the chief engineer and 
the coal passer, together, to work out the 
problem of their relationship with each other 
while they were moving with Gibson. There 
is reason for that patriotism; there is reason 
for all of our people being behind our Govern- 
ment. No Government in the history of time 
that has been established by the great and the 
strong ever suffered more patiently in dignity, 
absolute dignity than did the Government of 
the United States. It felt confident of its 
state; it felt sure of its purpose; its motives 
were clear and it could aflford to be patient. 
Rut when the German Government, after say- 
ing to us that it W'ould withdraw the policy of 
destroying the lives of our people without notice 
and without warning, certainly insisted upon 
restoring the policy of the destruction of Ihc 
lives of our people: when almost in the same 
breath it held out the temptation to Mexico to 
join with the German Government in an ag- 
gressive policy against the United States, prom- 
ising Mexico that portion of our territory in- 
cluded in Texas, in New Mexico and .Arizona 
in return for the enterprise, and held out the 
inducement to Taiian that if she would engage 
in an aggressive policy against the United 
States Government that all of that great w-est- 
crn territory from the Rockies through to the 
Pacific would be her share of the prize; and 



then, in addition to that, sought to impose the 
will of the Kaiser upon us by saying to us, 
"One day a week you may send a vessel to 
Falmouth, provided you mark it like a barber's 
sign," patience ceased to be u virtue, and if 
we wanted to maintain the dignity of the 
United States and honor of the United States, 
and what is of just as great importance, the 
democratic institutions of the United States 
there was nothing left for us to do but to say 
to the Kaiser, as w^as said in the cartoon, 
where the Kaiser and Uncle Sam are standing 
face to face together, and the Kaiser was say- 
ing to Uncle Sam, "One day in the week you 
can go to Falmoutli," and Uncle Sam replied, 
with great vehemence, "Seven days in the week 
you can go to Hell." (Applause and cheering.) 
With our democratic institutions threatened, 
why would we not be solemn? Our demo- 
cratic institutions are the most perfect of the 
kind that have ever been established on the 
face of the globe in all history. The working 
man may not have achieved all that he desires 
to achieve, all that some believe he ought to 
achieve, but if he has not it has been by virtue 
of the fact that the majority have not as yet de- 
clared that the achievement should take place. 
He has a voice in determining the state of 
affairs here; under an autocracy he has no 
voice. What is true of the worker is true also 
of the employer and of the capitalist, both 
have a voice; all have a voice in determining 
the policy of our Government, the conditions 
under which we will live. If an autocracy is 
imposed upon us, then it will be another case 
of "one day a week to Falmouth," or "one day 
a week you may go to Chicago; one day a 
week you may go to Boston," or one day to 
anywhere else that the autocracy may permit. 
Naturally we would resist with all the power 
we have a condition of that kind being im- 
posed upon us, and if we would resist with all 
the power we have the conditions being im- 
posed upon us, are we going to allow our 
prejudices, are we going to allow what we 
conceive to be our economic interests, under 
normal times, and under normal conditions, to 
stand in the way of our getting the fullest ex- 
pression and the greatest efficiency of our 
man power? We cannot afiford to do that. 

So I have had this in mind, saying to these 
gentlemen who are representatives of labor, 
"This is no time to stand for a recognition of 
the union"; this is no time to insist upon 
working with no one else but union men. This 
is a time when your duty requires that you 
shall lay aside your prejudices, that you shall 
lay aside what you conceive to be your eco- 
nomic interests, and say to those who are 
engaged in the shipping trade, "We will work 
alongside of a non-union man; we will teach 
the non-union man as rapidly as we can teach 
him, if he is a new man and needs teaching; 
we will make him an efficient sailor and we 
will take our chances of getting him into the 
sailors' union after the w^ar is over. In the 
meantime we will make him an efficient sailor 
as rapidly as we possibly can." (Applause.) 

You men who are the representatives and 
managers of the shipping interests, I want to 
say to you that this is no time to stand upon 
your rights, to insist upon nothing but non- 
union men. You may have that right, but you 
are not compelled to exercise that right, 'i'ou 
can either exercise it or refuse to exercise it, 
and in this crisis it is no time for you to 
insist upon e.xercising rights that drive those 
away from seamanship who otherwise would 
come into the service and give us the necessary 
skilled men to man our vessels up to the high- 
est number that it may be possible for us to 
put upon the seas. (Applause.) 

So my thought has been to let you, who are 
the representatives of the shipping companies, 
get together here this afternoon and pick five 
men from your midst as a committee, let those 
men who are the representatives of the em- 
ployes get together and select five men from 
their midst; let Secretary Redfield select a rep- 
resentative of the Department of Commerce: 
let me select a representative from the Depart- 
ment of Labor; let those twelve men get to 
work to-night and work out a workable prop- 
osition that will give us the means by which 
we can educate the uneducated men into sea- 
manship and give us all the men that are 
necessary to draw upon in any emergency and 
that is the suggestion that I raise at this time, 
because in a few minutes Secretary Redfield 
and I will have to leave here, and I renew 
the suggestion in the interests of harmony in 
the shipping trade, in the interests of educating 
a sufficient number of men to that skill which 
will mean efficiency and safety that is neces- 
sary for the handling of our vessels. 

I again suggest to you that you appoint this 
kind of a committee, composed of five repre- 
sentatives from each side, and one from each 
of the Departments, to work out this evening 
and to report tomorrow morning a workable 
proposition that will reach the desired result. 
And one man from the .Shipping Board, also, 
T judge. 

Statement of Andrew Furuseth. 

Mr. Furuseth: While I am perfectiv agree- 
able to the proposition made by the Secretary 
of Labor. I believe that it is premature. There 
are certain things, gentlemen, that T think we 
ought to get out of our stomachs, on both 



sides of this question, if there are two sides. 
There are some things that have got to be 
said here, and they should be said to every- 
body, and they should be said before the com- 
mittees are finally set to work. 

I realize that all of us will have to go to 
work when the time comes. There are some 
things, I believe, which should be said when 
we are all together. To say them in a com- 
mittee may or may not be effective. 

There are certain conditions on the Lakes 
tiiat have got to be explained. The Lakes arc 
the cradle for the training of seamen in this 
country, and they may be made so. It is not 
necessary to say that we all appreciate that 
that is so. There are reasons why it is hard 
to get men to go to sea. Some of those can 
be removed by the joint action of the Depart- 
ments, and by the joint action of the men who 
sail and the men who hire them. 

It seems to me before you go to the com- 
mittee work you ought to get those things 
plain, and get some understanding, generally, 
as* to the viewpoint. 

Now, you had the viev^-point of the owners, 
to a very large extent, coming from Mr. Gib- 
son. You have had the viewpoint of the offi- 
cers of the deck department; you have had the 
viewpoint of the engineer officers, but after all 
the engineers have got to come from the fire- 
men and coal passers and water tenders and 
oilers, and the deck officers have got to come 
from the forecastle or from the deck. There is 
no royal road to efficient seamanship on the 
bridge, except training on board a vessel. Now, 
unless those men can also feel that their view- 
point is heard and is properly understood, there 
will not be the kind of co-operation, gentle- 
men, that j'ou want here. 

For that reason I said early in the day 
tliat what is needed here, above all things, is 
plain talk, right from the heart. You have had 
it from these other men, and if you can get 
tlie time you should also have it from the men 
before the mast. If you have not got time 
now, it is wise, in my opinion, gentlemen, to 
postpone this action and hear those men. If 
you cannot go on now, it is not wise, in my 
opinion, to take any action now, but to let 
what has been said sink in, and let us come 
back tomorrow, and let the different parties 
get together, if they can, in an unofficial way, 
before they get together in an official way. I 
believe if you do not do that, it will not lead 
to the results you desire. 

Address by Mr. H. P. Griffin. 

Mr. H. P. Griffin: Mr. Secretary, I have 
listened with a great deal of pleasure and some 
lirofit to what has been said by the previous 
speakers, representing all parts of the ship 
except the sailors. 

In looking over the past history of the 
United States and other countries as well, 
I have come to the conclusion, with a good 
many others, that an army moves on its 
belly, to speak rather roughly. 

Go ahead and man your ships, get your 
sailors, and all the rest of the men on the 
ship. Get all those men aboard. I do not 
know W'hether you will be able to move your 
ships that way; in the merchant service, they 
do not. I have seen ships lie quite a while 
waiting for the fellow who prepares the food. 
There is no man aboard a vessel, there is no 
man fighting in the Army or the Navy or any- 
where else who can fight very well on an 
empty stomach, or on a poorly fed stomach. 
Tliat is a thing that has been neglected for 
many years by the American government, pro- 
viding for the welfare of the men's stomachs. 

There has not been anything said about cooks 
p.t all here to-day. Of course their patriotism is 
unquestioned, I believe. There is no necessity 
of referring to that at all. If this Conference 
shall come to a sudden close, such as has 
heen suggested by the Secretary of Labor, and 
a committee of five be appointed which, i 
imagine, would be composed of one man from 
the engineers, whom we have heard from, one 
man from the deck, whom we have heard 
from, one man from the longshoremen, whom 
wc have heard from, and whom we expect to 
hear more from, and one man from the sailors 
and one from the firemen, that would be five 
right there, and the cook, the fellow who 
makes the whole thing go round is not in it. 
and 1 am going to tell you there is nobody who 
can tell you about the interests of that part of 
the ship as well as the practical cook, the man 
who knows whereof he speaks, and who has 
had experience. 

Here is a ship at a dock, ready to sail, with 
the entire crew aboard, but everybody is un- 
happy. Finally, they sec comin.g down the 
street a fellow with a grip sack, and the hand 
strikes up the tune, ".See the Conquering Hero 
Comes." and some of the men go down tin 
street to meet this fellow and carry his grii'- 
sack aboard. It is the ship cook. 

None of us like to go empty; we want 
something in our stomachs to work on. 

So that the cooks would like to have a little 
something to say about matters which will 
be considered by this committee. I notice that 
in every movement that has ever been made, 
whether bv the .Xrmy. by the Navy, bv the 
Shipping Board, or by anybody, people go 
anywhere and everywhere to get cooks, ex- 
cept to the place where they can get them. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



where tlic cooks are, and Ihcn, when they 
finally cannot get them, at the eleventh 
hour they come to us, and that has been 
our experience very recently in connection 
with the War Department. That branch of 
the War Department concerned with the trans- 
l>ort service which carried the men to France, 
recently, on a Saturday at noon called upon 
lis to furnish cooks to get away with the trans- 
ports that were going to France. At 12 o'clock 
on Saturday they called upon us for cooks to 
go on the transports, to. sail on Monday. 

We got the cooks for them, but it was by a 
miracle of hard work. Our organization spent 
iiundreds of dollars to do it, but we got the 
cooks for them. We are willing to spend every 
cent in our treasury in the interest of the 
common cause, but we are looking for a little 
representation in those matters also. We do 
not want to leave that until the last minute. 

Another thing, these things can be looked 
after ahead of time just as well as not. It is 
not necessary to wait until 12 o'clock on Satur- 
day to get cooks to sail on Monday. 

So far as what Secretary Rcdfield has said 
about the difficulty in getting men to sail, there 
is not any reason why you could not have 
the officers a week ahead. You could get them 
from San Francisco, and you could have them 
ahead of time just as well as not, because when 
a ship comes into dock, she has to have some 
work done on her, she has got to be fitted out, 
and all those things take time. You know what 
you need, and therefore tlierc is not any neces- 
sity of waiting until the last minute to try to 
get the men. 

I know what Brother Funiseth wants to talk 
about. He has some things he wants to get off 
his chest. He knows that there arc certain 
stumbling blocks, and it would be a good thing 
for the shipowners represented here or the 
manpgers here to know these things, and to get 
them in a heart-to-heart talk, to get them in a 
way that they could not get except in some 
such meeting as this. 

Tf you disband now, I do not see that there 
has been a great deal accomijlished, except that 
we may possibly feel a little more patriotic 
than when we came here, thanks to what we 
have heard from Secretary Rcdfield and Secre- 
tary Wilson. 

But T can assure you T believe everybody 
here when thev came here were full of patriot- 
ism anyway. I hope you will not disband this 
meeting until the seamen have had a chance to 
get off their chests the things they have on 
them, so that the representatives of the ship 
owners here can hear what they have on their 
chests, and then perhaps it may be we can 
reach a satisfactory result. 

T am one of the happiest men in the world 
to-day. personally, and so are the officials of 
our organization. T feel that since we got 
together and entered into a.grecmcnts with the 
representatives of the ship owners on the At- 
lantic Coast, and the talks that we have had 
with the representatives of the Government, 
that we can go along very contentedly from 
now on, if nothing intervenes to destroy what 
has been done. 

But to leave things rest as they are — we feel 
we can do very good work; we think we can 
get the necessary men, and then by our han- 
dling of them, put. as we did in the trans- 
ports, a certain number of practical, skilled men, 
and a certain number of men who can carry 
the ships over and back. With the wages now 
being offered we think we can get along very 
nicely. 

T will not take up any more of your time 
now. 

Secretary Wilson: Mr. Chairman, what I 
said was by way of suggestion. It was not a 
hard and fast proposition for a committee of 
five on each side, although it seemed to me 
that would be an equitable arrangement, be- 
cause, after all, while Mr. Griffin may represent 
the cooks, and Captain Westcott may represent 
the masters, mates and pilots, and Mr. Gibson 
may represent the engineers, they are all sea- 
men, and we used the term seamen, although 
llicsc men represent separate branches of sea- 
manship. 

I realize the necessity of feeding men, of 
having arrangements by which you can get the 
necessary help to prepare to feed them. 

I recall a number of years ago when my 
friend Mr. Furuseth demonstrated, not only to 
his own satisfaction, but to the satisfaction of 
a very large number of men, that a cook was 
not a cook, but was a seaman, and it was in 
that sense T was making the suggestion that 
there be a committee of five on each side ap- 
pointed. There might be six or seven, if it was 
necessary to have that many in o/der to get 
rcjiresentatives of the dififcrent elements. 

I realize that there is not time now, until the 
lime we have to go to work on this phase of 
(lie problem to-night, and I am willing that 
the matter shall go over until to-morrow morn- 
ing, and if Mr. Furuseth or anybody else has 
anything on his mind that he wants to get off, 
he will have an oi)portunity of getting it off 
lo-morrow morning, 

I suggest a recess uow until 10 o'clock to- 
morrow morning. 

f Thereupon, at 4:1. S o'clock ]). m., the con- 



ference took a recess until to-morrow, Thurs- 
day, August 2, 1917, at 10 o'clock a. m.) 



SECOND DAY. 

Washington, D. C, 
Thursday, August 2, 1917. 
The Conference reconvened, pursuant to ad- 
journment, at 10 o'clock, a. m. 

Secretary Wilson: Mr. Furuseth desired to 
be recognized at the time we adjourned yester- 
day evening. We will now hear from Mr. Furu- 
seth. 

Address by Mr. Andrew Furuseth. 

Mr. I*'uruseth: Mr. Chairman, as an oi)ening 
sentence T desire to call attention to the state- 
ment of Capt. Gibson, from Seattle. Capt. Gib- 
son appeals to the seamen to exhibit patriotism 
and as an evidence of his own patriotism he 
stated that he came across the continent and 
that he was willing to go as a master of a 
transport. 1 have not the slightest doubt but 
that there are a thousand masters who will be 
extremely willing to go as masters of trans- 
ports. I think Capt. Gibson would prove his 
patriotism more definitely by offering to take 
charge of a tramp, filled with ammunition, that 
is treading its way across the .\tlantic be- 
tween the U-boats for the purpose of landing 
the necessary supplies in France. The sailors, 
firemen, cooks and stewards are sailing in those 
boats now, they are not making any bones about 
it, but they are willing and I do not think that 
there has been any difficult)' in getting men 
for the places. T want to say to you gentlemen 
here that they are sailing and that they are 
taking all tlie chances that are to be taken in 
the matter largely because the United States 
passed the so-called Seamen's .Act and made the 
seaman a free man. 

Yesterday, after a heart to heart talk, you 
came to the conclusion here that there would 
not likely be any serious difficulty about ob- 
taining the necessary officers of the higher 
grades. Whether that applies to the engine 
room or to the deck, 1 think I can state — at 
least my understanding is — that yon agreed that 
there mi.ght be difficulty and there were likelv 
to be difficulties in obtaining men for the 
lower grades, and that those men should be 
obtained from the forecastle and from the fire- 
room as experienced men. That means, if it is 
done, that it will be done at a depletion, to 
that extent, of the men who are now sailing 
in the fire-room and in the forecastle and there- 
fore, the question of replenishing them and find- 
ing the number that are necessary will be all 
the more difficult and the question really at is- 
sue — the very serious question — is how to get 
the skilled men to do that kind of work. 

With reference to the firemen, I think I can 
say that a fairly good fireman can be made in 
six months. With reference to the sailors, every 
one of you here who is a practical man knows 
that they cannot be made in any such period 
of time as that and based upon this situation 
tiiat we are facing I have a suggestion to make 
for the serious consideration of the ofticials of 
the Government, .\ccording to a census which 
we have taken there are about S,000 Germans 
sailing under the American flag in different ca- 
])acitics. It may be said that they are among 
the highest skilled men, whether they sail in 
the forecastle, in the fire-room or in the gallev. 
Of these men, about 5,000 all told, 3,721 are in 
the organizations of the seamen and liguring 
it up on the same basis of those outside organ- 
izations there should be at least 5,000, It is a 
very serious matter to displace them and I want 
to suggest the serious thought, based upon the 
psychology of seamen as I know it, whether 
it would not be well to use those men where 
they can be used in order to release other men 
for the trans-Atlantic trade. The importance of 
the matter is to get highly skilled men. A 
fast vessel and a highly skilled crew is the real 
defense against a U-boat. 

When a seaman has begun to sail in dilfcrent 
vessels and, in a sense, divorced himself from 
his own country, his primary loyalty is to the 
ship he is on and to his shipmates and T do not 
think that there is any danger in making use 
of those men in the purely coastwise trade and 
in the Lakes trade. It may be said that they 
can destroy something in the Lake trade, but 
that anybody can do if they particularly want 
to do it if they are for sale and they disre.gard 
tlic shipmates they are sailing with, 

T am calling attention to this for a furtlur 
purpose. It was stated here yesterday by the 
Secretary of Labor and the newspapers arc full 
of it, so there will not be any improprietv in 
my suggesting that there are Germans who have 
been sailing under the .American flag for years 
r.nd if the same policy is dealt with with ref- 
erence to those men, necessarily they would 
ha\e to go with the TToIlander, the Norwegian 
and the Danes who arc sailing under the .Amer- 
ican flag and when you get to dealing with, 
them, they constitute 50 i)er cent, of the men 
who are sailing in the coastwise and oversea 
trade from the coasts. Of course, if they are 
driven into the war side they will be alien 
enemies and it would Ik- a (|uestion then of 
what could be done with them. This 1 want to 
get to your minds in order that the Government 
officials may look at it from the \iewpoint, for 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



Notice to Seamen 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
nioney shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain, 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 

(Continued from Page 9.) 



llic time being, and give it the study that it 
seems from my point of view to require, not 
for tlie sake of tlic men, as that is insigiiil'icant, 
but for the sake of the Nation and for the sake 
of the war supplies that have to be furnished 
in sonic way. 

Let me suggest how to get the men for the 
forecastle, the fire-room and the galley. We 
submitted some time ago to the Atlantic ship- 
owners, through the Shipping Board, a propo- 
sition which became known as a tentative agree- 
ment. We submitted that to them in May and 
for one reason or another it has not been com- 
pleted yet, although it is practically in full 
operation. We have so treated it, as being in 
operation, because we are telling the men that 
this arrangement is in practical operation and 
now is the time for them to show that they ap- 
preciate what the United States has done for 
the seamen, now is the time for them to come 
and sail and take their chances with the rest 
who are sailing in the oversea trade. They are 
coming to such an extent to the Atlantic Coast 
that up to the present, though a great many 
vessels have had to be filled, there have been 
no vessels delayed if notice has been given in 
time for those who have been working among 
the men to try to get them to fdl the places. 

We also have the nationality census of deep 
sea fishermen on the Pacific. The bulk of 
them are of Norse origin, some 1700 of them 
Norwegians, .300 or so are Nova Scotians and 
I suppose 200 or 300 are Americans — I do not 
know how many Americans, but they are com- 
jiaratively few. Wc have also the nationality 
census of the deep sea fishermen on the New 
1-ingland Coast and there are some 28(X). and 
they are all sailor.s, these deep sea fishermen. 
They are on the kind of a vessel that de- 
velops the sailor better than any other kind and 
ihey are all boatmen of the highest type . The 
bulk of those men are either .^mericans or Brit- 
ishers, so there is no nationality question there. 
It is simply a question of getting the men to 
understand that they are really needed and that 
they ought to come and I do not think there 
will lie any difficulty in getting them. 

Aside from that, there arc in the Alaska Fisher- 
men's Union, some 1500 sailors, real sailors and 
iishermcn, men who can handle any kind of a 
ship, many of them could go as officers so far 
as tliat is concerned, but that is another phase 
of it. However, there are some 1500 of them 
that wc know arc first class seamen and besides 
being first class boatmen I have not any doubt 
that out of that number, a large number can be 
obtained when needed. 

There is one phase of this question that I 
want to call especial attention to and I am go- 
ing to ask this question of the Secretary of 
Commerce. The present rules for physical ex- 
amination throw out men as able seamen, and 
cjuite a number of them, who have but one eye 
or a blemished hand or one hand. Those men 
were sailing as able seamen before the bill was 
passed, they were doing w-ork to the entire 
.satisfaction of the men who employed them, and 
not being able to get an able seaman's certificate, 
and being too proud to go into any other posi- 
tion, and having been in that position right 
along and knowing their business thoroughly, 
they went to fishing. If a man can pick lish 
out of a fishing net and do it fast enough to 
earn a living in Alaska, there is not much the 
matter with his hands. So far as having lost 
an eye is concerned, I say that those experi- 
enced men can see more, when it comes to a 
ciuestion of looking at things in the ocean, than 
a dozen greenhorns can see with two eyes. 1 
therefore request the Secretary to consider 
whether it would not be possible to so change 
those regulations in order to admit those men 
with a blemished hand. 

Secretary Redfield: 1 will make up my mind 
right away about a man with one eye, and I 
have ruled right along that an officer with one 
eye is entitled to a license and, therefore, I 
should rule, myself, without question that a sea- 
man with one eye is entitled to a certificate 
because I agree with you in what yon say about 
his being able to see more than a landlubber. 
One fact is that these rules are made by the 
Public Health Service and I shall recommend 
that the change be made at once. 

Mr. Furuscth: That is all we expect, Mr. Sec- 
retary, and we feel satisfied. Again I want to 
say that while I am interested in the men, I 
am much more interested in getting the services 
of those men to a mental attitude that it will 
carry weight with it. 

With reference to this tentative agreement, 1 
will say that on the Sth day of May the Ad- 
visory Committee of the Shipping Board and 
representatives of the organized seamen of the 
.\tlantic Coast met in the Board room undrr 
the leadership of the President of the Shipping 
Board himself, all members being present but 
one. The question of how to obtain the neces- 
sary men for the vessels was being taken uj) in 
a discussion that lasted from 9:30 until 1:00 
o'clock. We then came to a tentative agree- 
ment as follows, that the vessels should, as far 
as po.ssible, increase their imniber of men; for 
instance, if they carried eight able seamen they 
would increase that number by adding two 
young men to that number, take two of the 
able seamen who are in tliat crew out and put 



them in some other vessel and put ordinary 
seamen in their places in order to make the 
crew consist of si.x able seamen, two ordinary 
seamen and two boys — boys we call them, but 
they should not be less than 18 years of age 
because they should have physical strength and 
some willpower. 

In addition to that the shipowners agreed, and 
they have since notified the Shipping Board, 
that they have agreed to instruct their officers 
to give to the ordinary seamen and the young 
boys the fullest and fairest opportunity to learn 
the calling. In other words, they will be taken 
on the forecastle, on the lookout with an able 
seaman and they will go to the lee-wheel, as we 
call it, with an able seaman. Whenever an able 
seaman does any particular work the younger 
man will be along and will be taught why a 
thing is necessary to be done in a certain way. 
We, seamen, on the other hand, pledge our- 
selves — and we will use every efTort that we 
can — to teach these young men the knowledge 
of seamanship sufficient to make them of real 
value. We will not hesitate a minute any time 
or under any conditions and it will be our part 
to take all of these young men on the fore- 
castle and explain how to keep a proper look- 
out, how to go to the wheel and steer — those 
things are comparatively easy — how to lower 
boats and how to do this and that, and we, in 
our turn, pledge ourselves to do that in abso- 
lute good faith. 

There are thousands of sailors and firemen in 
the United States who have left the calling and 
they have left it because they could not see any 
way of making a living in it and they have left 
it because of loss in conditions. H shipowners 
and the seamen together could make a call upon 
those men to come back to the sea, in appre- 
ciation of what the United States has done for 
the seamen, and if that call is countersigned by 
Government officers so that the men will see 
that it is meant in good faith, it will go a long 
way towards bringing a number of them back. 
T^ct me be frank, gentlemen: If the seamen 
were to issue that call, those men would say 
that they have no control over the matter be- 
cause they could not give them a job. If the 
shipowners were to issue the call they would 
say they would not believe them, they could 
not see any reason why they should believe 
them, but if the two get together they will 
say "This sounds reasonable, but the question 
is have the seamen had something put over on 
them?" But, when that call is countersigned 
by oflicials of the Government, such as the Ship- 
ping Board or the Secretary of Labor and the 
.Secretary of Commerce together, then I have 
no doubt but what we can get to those men 
and in very large numbers get them to come 
and take their share. 

The same call would go to the young men 
and we could say to them, "Come here. We 
will give you an opportunity to learn" and to 
the seamen we could say, "We will give you an 
opportunity to teach." Of course, those men 
wil go for some time before they find out 
whether they are fit for duty or not. If they 
come to the conclusion they are fit for the sea 
and really men to stay with the sea, then they 
have an opportunity to be examined as to their 
physical fitness or, sometimes a man is not fit 
when he thinks he is — he may be color blind 
or have some little affection like that and a 
young fellow should not have lost his time 
unnecessarily. 

We believe that this is a way out, that this 
is a way to get back the skilled men we need, 
it is a way of getting the young man and we 
believe that in this tentative agreement, as we 
have called it, and as the shipowners have 
agreed to, we believe that here is the keynote 
that can be applied throughout the country. 
The shipowners give to the representatives of 
the Union free opportunity to go on their ships 
and on their docks to talk with their men at all 
times. That was essential in order to make 
the thing a success. We believe that this ten- 
tative agreement if adopted with minor changes, 
is the most important of all things that stare 
us in the face, or at least, in thinking it over 
and studying it and after studying it for a 
long time, wc have not been able to find any 
better way of dealing with the question. 

There are men here from every seaport in 
the United States, Boston, New York, Norfolk, 
New Orleans, San Francisco and Puget Sound; 
they have come here at great expense to the 
men who have sent them. They are in con- 
stant contact with the men. they know the feel- 
ing of the men, they know what corns may fit 
their shoes, the difficulties they may have in 
obtaining men, and that is one of the reasons 
why I brought the matter up yesterday and 
suggested that five minutes' talk of this Con- 
ference be given to those men in order that 
the shipowners may get first-hand information 
as to just what the situation is in their dif- 
ferent localities. Having said this, I think T 
have dealt with all that is essential to be dealt 
with for the real purpose in view. 

Secretary Redfield: Mr. Furuseth, at the be- 
ginning of your remarks you sjioke of the plan 
for dealing with certain men now in the serv- 
ice. There are a number of gentlemen who 
have ccime in since you went over that phase 
of your remarks and 1 WMiild like li< have yi>ii 
state the plan again. 

Mr. Furuseth: According to i.ur census — and 
it is taken right from our cards of membership, 
there arc in round numbers about 27,250 able 



seamen in the country. Nearly 5,000 of them 
are Germans. There are, of course, a "large 
number of cooks, stewards, butchers and bakers, 
particularly cooks, butchers and bakers, which 
from the steward department point of view is 
the most important position on board ship. 
Those men, the Germans, have been sailing here 
for years. There are a few who have not 
sailed more than one year, and those who have 
not sailed for more than one year before the 
war was declared I would cut them out. But 
those men who have been sailing here, dealing 
with the psychology of the seaman as it really 
is, I believe you can use those men in the coast- 
wise and Lake trade without any danger be- 
cause when a man has lived in a vessel, he 
knows vessels as a rule, having sailed in them 
one year after another. His loyalty is to the 
ship that he is in and to the men that he is 
with, and they are no more likely to do any 
more harm to the ship that they are in than any 
other man. 

If it comes to a question of paying somebody 
to fight and somebody to do serious damage, 
the chances are they would fight almost any- 
body, because humanity is weak. But those 
Germans are no more subject to that kind of 
temptation than anybody else, in my opinion. 
I am dealing with it from the point of view of 
occasional necessity, to make use of those men 
on the coastwise and Lake trade, so as to train 
the others who can go across, and let them 
have the trans-.Atlantic trade in which they will 
have to face the U-boat. The Germans can- 
not go; they would be interned. 

I am anxious in dealing with this question for 
this reason, that whatever position is taken 
with reference to the Germans necessarily will 
apply to the neutrals, as we call them to-day — 
the seamen of Holland. Denmark, Norway and 
Sweden. Those four nations furnish us more 
than 50 per cent, of the able seamen who arc 
sailing out of Atlantic ports, going across, or 
out of Pacific ports, going across, anyway. They 
are the highest skilled men that we have. Now, 
I believe if it unfortunately turns out that those 
nations are driven into the war, and get on the 
wrong side, we will lose not only the German 
seamen hut the Scandinavians because they 
would then have to be interned and yf)U will 
take away all the real skill that is here — that is, 
the bulk of it. If you could train men on the 
sea it would be all right, but you cannot do that 
with seamen. 

So I submit to this Conference, and to you 
Government officials who know the governmental 
policy on that question — to take it into serious 
consideration. T believe those men can be of 
use; I believe they can be trusted. 

In reference to the Germans, this is what I 
said to them in San Francisco, and there were 
a lot of them there in the Union — I said, "Now, 
men, it is a difficult position that the Germans 
occupy, but make it as easy for them as you 
possibly can." To the Germans I said, "Think 
of the position you yourselves occupy and be 
sure that you tighten your jaw tackle." — you 
know seamen will talk. Men who do not un- 
derstand seamen think that they are going to 
do things, so I advised them to tighten up their 
jaw tackle, and they all agreed that it was a 
proper thing to do. 

Now, if there is a German amongst us whom 
the seamen think is dangerous, I pledge you 
there is not one among us who would not point 
him out and say, "Here, boy, you have got to 
quit this business and (piit it quick or we will 
turn you over to the authorities and have you 
interned; we will have no hesitation about 
that." We would not allow an individual of 
that description to remain. There would be no 
danger with regard to that. But if wc are pre- 
pared to say that this man is all right, a man 
who is known in this country, it seems to me 
that under the circumstances, not alone for the 
sake of the man but for the sake of the coun- ' 
try, and for the sake of the war, that man 
power ought not to be thrown away. 

Now, if it please you, Mr. Chairman, I sug- 
gest that you hear some of the men from Bos- 
ton and New York. If you desire me to call 
them, I will be glad to do so. 

Secretary Wilson: We will be very glad to 
hear a representative of the seamen from Bos- 
ton or from New York. 

Mr. Furuseth: It may be well to take up 
the Coast first and deal with it, as shortly as 
possible so as to give full opportunity for the 
Lake representatives to deal with the question 
there because they can be used as a reservoir 
of seamen if you can get the poison out of 
them. 

I introduce Mr. Pryor, Secretary of the At- 
lantic and Gulf Sailors' Association. 



Statement of Mr. Percy J. Pryor. 

Mr. Pryor: Mr. Chairman and gentlemen. 



the 
•ondition's 'in the port of Boston as they are 
to-day, show that there is at present no scar- 
city of able seamen. We can fill every ship 
that will be sent across by the Shipping Board 
and in the coastwise trade and in the overseas 
trade. We have numerous applications from 
young American boys for opportunities to' go 
to sea. L'sually, if we send them aboard a 
ship — which is very rarely the occasion, in so 
far as the tentative agreement as submitteil 
on May 8th has not been followed by the ship- 
owners in regard to making provision for car- 
rying ordinary seamen and boys, and in cases 
where the American boy gets one look at the 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



forecastle of the ship, his idea of going to sea 
is stopped right there. 

Now, since the establishment of these schools, 
the American boy tries to get into the school, 
thereby getting the opportunity to ship as quar- 
termaster. There he has better living condi- 
tions, going as quartermaster, because they 
have a room with two berths, but the possi- 
bility of going as quartermaster with the lim- 
ited experience that is gotten in the schools, 
it would simply show that as to the boy ship- 
ping as quartermaster, the men aboard the ship 
would have to do his vi'ork. 

While I am here I want to say a word in 
regard to what Mr. Evans said yesterday, with 
respect to the policy of the Shipping Board and 
the schools, that it is absolutely correct. I was 
talking to Mr. Howard of the Shipping Board 
in Boston and Captain O'Donnell, Supervising 
Inspector, and they said that the policy of the 
school in the Institute of Technology was to 
take the practical men and make them ofificials 
in the engineers' department and in the deck 
department. He also said to me that they would 
rather have a practical man from our Associa- 
tion take the examination for an official than 
any man they knew. At the present time our 
hall is covered with advertisements from the 
Shipping Board in regard to technical schools, 
and we are doing our utmost to get practical 
men to go there, men who have been sailing as 
quartermasters and boatswains for years; we are 
trying to get them to go to those schools and 
take examinations as officials. I believe that 
the living conditions aboard ship should be im- 
proved. Take some of the later ships, for in- 
stance. Their forecastle conditions arc very 
fine; there is no need of improvement; but if 
you take a number of the old coastwise ships, 
the living conditions are abhorrent. I would 
not want my own boy to go to sea under those 
circumstances. I would rather hit him in the 
head with an ax than see him go and live in 
the forecastle under the present living conditions 
in some of those forecastles. The modern ships 
are fitted out entirely different from the old 
ships, and there is no adequate reason why the 
forecastle cannot be improved, as it should be, 
if we want the American boy to go to sea. 
With the help and co-operation of the ship- 
owners — if they will co-operate in regard to 
carrying the ordinary seamen and boys — there is 
no adequate reason why the American boy 
shipping at the present time, cannot be induced 
to go to sea. Hundreds of them are perfectly 
willing to go to sea provided they have the 
opportunity. I know that. We have applica- 
tions from all kinds of boys every week now; 
I do not know why it is, whether it is to duck 
the draft, or what it is, but there is an especially 
large number of them who want to go to sea, 
and I do not see why provision cannot be made 
for them. 

As Mr. Furuseth has stated, witii regard to 
the rule respecting certificates for able sea- 
men, there might be a little more elasticity 
regarding physical defects. Take a man, for 
instance, who has beein going away, an al)lc 
seaman, for years with one eye or the loss of 
a finger, or hernia — any of those fellows have 
been in a square-rigged vessel for years, and 
have always been able to do their work and get 
their discharges — very good and excellent dis- 
charges from vessels, and why should they be 
exempt just on a technicality, the loss of a finger 
or one eye? I do not see why that cannot be 
changed, and if that were done there would be 
a larger number of able seamen who would hold 
certificates and who would answer the call to 
board ships. 

I think that is all I care to say, Mr. Chair- 
man. I thank you. 

Statement of Mr. Frank Libbey. 

Mr. Libbey: Mr. Chairman and gentlemen, 
the great problem seems to be along the At- 
lantic Coast. That problem seems to be to 
.supply men to man vessels that the Government 
is putting out, operating through the Shipping 
Board and these private owners. 

I can say for the Port of Boston, where I 
am located now as a representative of the or- 
ganization up there on the Firemen's Union, 
that up to the present time there has been no 
shortage of men in manning those vessels, and 
I can say, regardless of the number of vessels 
that go out of that port flying the American 
flag, or any other flag, there will be no shortage^ 
provided the seamen are convinced that they 
will get certain things, and that certain things 
will be followed. 

The question since the declaration of war 
amongst the men of our craft, has been the 
great question: Will the American public and 
the Government of the United States uphold 
the seamen's law that gives them freedom? 
That is one of the reasons why the men in our 
craft are taking the chance of going across and 
in the supply of ships dealing with the sub- 
marines. They have been told that there will 
be no tampering with the law as it now stands. 
In reference to the British vessels, there was a 
statement made here yesterday that on account 
of this law the men are (juitting the F"iiglisli 
vessels and coming into American ports and they 
find it hard to supply the men to take those 
vessels out. I find it this way in the port of 
Boston: The owners of ships in that port, 



coming into that port, and shipowners from 
other places, are compelled to live up to the 
laws. A man quits a vessel when he gets in 
if he wants to quit, and I find it this way, that 
when a man quits somebody else goes in there 
in his place and the vessel goes out without any 
delay. There has been no delay to my knowl- 
edge in getting the English or other foreign 
vessels in the trans-Atlantic trade out of that 
port. They are a little harder to man than the 
American vessels on account of the forecastle 
conditions. They do not provide the food that 
American vessels provide, but at the same time 
there is a class of men that follow those ships 
and they always will follow them. As far as I 
can figure out — and I have watched things 
pretty closely over there — there is quite a per- 
centage of young men and boys following 
those vessels, and for this reason, that previous 
to the declaration of war, previous to the war — 
before this country was involved — there was very 
little trans-Atlantic trade out of that port under 
the American flag. It was all English trade, 
and there is a certain class of men who would 
sooner get in the trans-Atlantic trade than the 
coastwise trade on account of the long trips 
and the money that is in it. There are certain 
reasons why men quit those vessels; there are 
certain obstacles to overcome _ along this At- 
lantic coast, before the organization which I 
represent in the port of Boston can give of its 
time in getting these vessels out and across. 

That is all I have to say, gentlemen. I thank 
you, Mr. Chairman. 

Statement of Mr. Gustav H. Brown. 

Mr. Brown: Mr. Chairman, I understood as 
I came in here that this conference was called 
primarily to try to point out some ways and 
means of getting enough men to man the 
.'\merican merchant marine, officers as well as 
seamen, sailors, firemen, cooks and stewards. 

I want to say that as far as the seamen are 
concerned — the 'sailor — the man who goes on 
deck out of the port of New York, that there 
is no scarcity of men; there is rather a surplus 
of men, a.s far as able seamen are concerned, 
and there has been with the exception of two 
or three weeks this spring, or perhaps less than 
that. The men are there, and there is a sur- 
plus at this time. I realize though, from the 
statement here of Government officials, that 
the American merchant marine will increase 
greatly, but that there is cause for worry as to 
where to find the men for these new ships that 
the Government is building. I can assure you, 
Mr. Chairman, and Mr. Secretary, and gentle- 
men of this conference, that as far as our men 
are concerned they arc as patriotic as any, be 
they citizens or not. 

For the last three years our men — particularly 
tiie men of our organization — have been run- 
ning across the western ocean, and particularly 
to France and the British Isles, ever since this 
European war was declared, and they have taken 
their chances without any murmur, and without 
any hesitation. A number of the men have been 
wounded and (|uite a large number of them 
drowned through the U-boats, but because they 
are in this country, and because they have made 
a living under the American flag, that does not 
seem to deter them from going in those vessels 
aeain. I can point out to you^some of our men 
from boats that have been sunk by torpedoes 
and shell fire — not from one ship or two ships, 
hilt dozens, and yet they come back and take 
the same chance again. 

The one thing that seems to worry our peo- 
ple more than anything else, Mr. Chairman and 
Mr. Secretary, is the fact that although you 
have passed the Seamen's Act, and it has be- 
come a law, we find that in some particulars 
the law has not been enforced in the way that 
it ought to be enforced. I say that frankly be- 
cause I was told yesterday, and I heard from 
the discussion here, that we were supposed to 
be very frank and blunt with one another, and 
I propose to be as frank and as blunt as I pos- 
sibly can be. We have to-day on the Atlantic 
Coast, and mainly in the coastwise trade, a 
large number of vessels that are manned by men 
of other races. Quite a large number of them 
are men commonly known as caracoas; they 
come down from Caracoa, from the Dutch West 
Indies. They arc unable in most cases to un- 
derstand or speak the English language. They 
have got a great number of Latins, who can 
neither speak or understand the English lan- 
guage. 

(To be Continued.) 



A report has been current on the water front 
that the turbincrs "Yale" and "Harvard" might 
be transferred to the Atlantic for service be- 
tween New York and a New England port. 
Officials of the Pacific Steamship Company said 
they had received no advice as to such change 
being in contemplation. The steamers "Massa- 
chusetts" and "Bunker Hill" were withdrawn 
last week from the New York-Boston run, and 
it was reported the Eastern Steamship Companv 
intended 1<> put the "North Star" and "North 
Land" on the run. According to the report, 
efforts were being made to get the "Yale" and 
■•Harvard," thus releasing the "North Star''^ and 
"North Land" for other service. The "Yale" and 
"Harvard" were on the New York-Boston run 
before being brought to the coast. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 
Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

Headquarters: 

406 N. Clark Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 3037. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 19 Main Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 1-2 Ferry Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 47 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, Hi 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth. Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven. Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Relief Stations: 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. 



Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee. Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sanduslty, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches; 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore gSVz 3rd Street 

EUREICA, Cal 227 First Street, P. O. Box 64 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash. ..64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal 613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

KIOATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Ala-ska P. O. Box 201 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 1.38 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 10 East Street 

S.A.CRAMENTO, Cal Labor Temple 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Anticipating a demand for more 
wages, the textile mills at Passaic, 
\. J., decided on an advance to 
their employes, numbering 15,000. It 
is claimed that the increase will reacli 
,i;i.O( «),()( )0, and becomes effective im- 
mediately. 

Bakers' Union No. 19, of Cleve- 
land, has signed an agreement with 
the Speck Baking Company, which 
has branches throughout the city. 
The firm attempted to check union- 
ism by offering inducements to in- 
dividual workers, but when this failed 
it recognized the organization. 

The workmen's compensation laws 
of various States having been set aside 
as unconstitutional hy the United 
States Supreme Court in so far as 
they affect ship labor, the .Ameri- 
can Association for Labor Legisla- 
tion announces that a bill to re- 
store the benefits of workmen's com- 
pensation to longshoremen will be 
introduced at the present session of 
Congress. 

The legislature of the State of West 
Virginia passed some time ago a law. 
which provides that every able-bodied 
person, within a definite age limit, 
must be engaged in some occupation 
at least 36 hours weekly. The lirst 
effort to use this law as an anti-strike 
weapon has failed. A jury acquitted 
a striking miner at Charleston, in- 
dicted under this act. In a second 
case the jury disagreed. 

.'\ temporary settlement of the San 
I-'rancisco shipyard strike was reached 
on September 23. The men had de- 
manded a 50 per cent, increase or a 
minimum wage of $6 a day. The 
employers had offered a ten per 
cent, increase. A temporary schedule 
was agreed to pending final adjudi- 
cation by the Federal Board of Con- 
ciliation. The settlement was brought 
about by Gavin McNab, a local at- 
torney, as special representative of 
the Federal Shipping Board. 

A conference was held at Char- 
lotte, N. C, with the purpose in view 
of attacking the Keating-Owen child- 
labor law and securing a decision 
similar to that made by Judge Bf)y<l. 
Counsel and cotton-mill owners from 
practically every Southern State were 
represented. Tt is alleged that the 
conference determined to enter prob- 
abl}' twelve or fourteen suits to test 
the constitutionality of the law in as 
many federal districts. If success- 
ful in their efforts the cotton-mill 
owners feel they can thus avoid com- 
pliance with the jirovisions of the 
law without awaiting a decision from 
the United States Supreme Court. 

Held under auspices of the Farm- 
ers Nonpartisan League with the 
co-operation of the .American Fed- 
eration of Labor and other indus- 
trial organizations, the National Pro- 
ducers and Consumers Convention 
in session at St. Paul from Septem- 
ber 18 to 20, adopted a platform deal- 
ing with exceedingly many subjects. 
.After declaring that political democ- 
racy is but a means to industrial 
democracy, the preamble pledges 
"Our lives, our fortunes and our 
sacred honor to our country and our 
flag in this, our war." and declares 
that, true to the ideals of their 
fathers and single in the purpose to 
make the world safe for democracy, 
politically and industrially, the farm- 
( rs of sixteen States and labor union- 
ists of eleven States "do hereby re- 
affirm our unalterable loyalty and 
allegiance to our fellow citizens and 
onr Government in this world strug- 
gle and in their every need." 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phon* Elliott 11M 



Eatabllahed 1S90 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Oata Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamship Inspectors' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-817 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

26 centit and up p«r Day 

Special Ratea Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wash., Letter Li»t. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Poatofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

not be held longer than 30 days from 

date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 

during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 

.\bolin, K. Hosset, C. 

Anderson, J. E. Jlendriksen, John 

-1149 Jansson, Olof 

Andersen, Peter Jacobson, John 

Andersen, A. C. Jensen, Harald 

Anderson, Barney Johnson, A. 

Anderson, H. -822 Johnson, Harry 

Andersen, And. Johnson, P. M. 

Arklof. Knut -1821 Johnson, Peter 

Andersen, Julius Johanson, Fred 

Andersen, K. P. Johnson, C. J. -1566 

Andersen, John Johnstone, A. C. 

-Vnderson, Martin Johnstone, Geo. W. 

.\l>rahamsen, W. .lohnson, Alex 

Holing, O. Julison, C. A. 

Rirkland, H. J. Jargenbeck, J. 

Brown, C. L. Johanson, J. R. 

lirctsen, Joe Kallasman, E. 

Br:mdt, Otto Karlberg, Fred. 

Bohm. Frank Kendrick, W. E. 

Bramley, T. Kimera, G. E. 

Herkman. O. Koppen, B. 

Bontte, Paul Kristiansen, J. A. 

Bntta. W. Lampo, Fred 

Bertelsen. B. Learned, J. W. 

Bonsen. Helge Lersten, J. O. 

Bmundl, F. Lindstrom. T. 

Biisrh. H. Ijowuin, J. 

Bjurnson. J. Loftman, H. O. 

( package) Luther, Alfred 

Benedict, Joe Lackey, C. 

Berglln, G. H. Larsen, Emll 

Borvlk, C. Ellasen Lundberg, C. 

Calllnen, F. Larsen, M. E. L. 

Carlson. J. -861 LIndecker, C. 

Chrl.s^tlansen. John Larsen, Ejernd 
Connovator, T. St. (package) 

Conge, H. Larsen, C. -1516 

Cunningham, Geo. Macdonald, H. 

Cadog.Tn, J. Maybaum. W. 

Caravan W. W. McPherson, J. R. 

Dp Wall. S. McKeoun, F. 

Desmond. J. P. Meier, Geo. 

Dreyer, Jack Mitchell, A. 

Duyherty, P. J. Mortensen. Aug. 

Droje. H. Morken, M. 

Darrow. H. Monsen, B. 

Kckstrnm. Geo. Morten.«en, J. B. 

Rise. Karl Magi. .John 

Klling.con. Erllng McNlcol, G. C. 

Kriksen. Sam Madsen, Johannus 

KHnndspn. Anton Mlkkelsen, K. -Ifi20 

Rrikscn. E. B. Mostad, Leonard 

F.kholm. Giis Mlkkelsen. P. 

Kriksen. .Mfred Madsen, C H. 

Kriksen. E. Matson. Eric 

Krikson. John MrLaughlln, Dan 

Fillhorn. J. A. Nelsson, A. W. 

Falvlg. John Nellsen, H. L. -1258 

Frutag. W. Nelsen, Senn Fr. 

'^'rolling. Fred Nelson. Joseph 

Green. Go. Nelsen, F. H. -1347 

c.iistafsnn. Carl J. Nerlin. Geo. 

Ciistafsen. Emll Nordstrom. G. R. 

Oahrlelsen. Gust Nordfelt. T. F. 

Cronheck. Theo. Nelsen, N. P. 

Grail A-»nseI -1116 Nilsen. N. B. 

rTardv. 'W. Nelson. M. -13.'?n 

Maiintiiofr. Fred Newman, .John 

Hnnsen. Carl Newland. E. 

Wnnsen. John Naro. J. 

rtfinsen. .Tohannes Nelsen. T.,. 

tTnnsen. Ron. Olsen. Eric 

"entschoU. Otto Olsen. C. A. -1302 

^'Icks. C. Olsen. A. M. 

"erminsen. Gus Olsen. E. O. 

"olbersr, Oluf Olsen, Julius 

tivlander. Gns Olsen. Klmar 

TTfinsen. Olof Olsen. K. -6824 

'^iinter. G. TT. Omholt. ^,. 

Hanneliiis, Ragnar Orell. A. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four yearH Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Rooms 3182-3183 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



H. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Andersson. Alberto 
Carlstrand. G. 
Darbarog, Martin 
Hodson, H. I. 
Ilolmstrom. Carl A. 
Jacobson. Gustaf 
Kalborg, William 
Kelnanen, Emil 
Magnusson, Ernest 

W. 
Martlnsson, E. 
Marx. Thorvald 



-751 



Nelson. C. W. 
Nielsen, Niels 
Palken, G. 
Pearson. Fred 
Petterson, Hjalmar 
Pettersen, Charles 

-472 
Slmonsen, Sam 
Stewart, Wm. H. 
Suemlnen, Oscar 
Swansen, Carl 



HARRY W. LEVY 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS 
Union Made Goods, Hata, Shoes, 



• Trunks and Suitcases ■ 



Fishermen's and Sailors' Supplies 

(OLD TOWN) Tacoma, Wash. 

Main 8S9S 



Eureka, CaL 



6S24 



Olsen. C. Otto 
Olsen. Albert 
Olsen. Johan S. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsen, Johan 
Olsen, Hialmar Fr. 
Olsen, Henry 
Olsen. J. H. 
Ovvall. Johan 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen. A. M. 
Olsson, C. M. 
Peters. F. W. 
Petersen. .T. 
Petersen. Oscar 
Porter. John 
Pusgrloff. S. 
Petterson. Chr. 
Pederson. H. -1560 
Perkins. Floyd 
Petersen. Hans L. 
Raymen. .John 
Ricsbeck. TTJalmar 
Rose. E M. 
Riiter. P. 
Rvlander. R. 
Rnsmussen. T,. 
RIsco.ssa. John 
Riickmick .Anton 
Rosnes. C. B. 
rJussel. .\rHiiir 
Runslrnm. Albert 



Renstrom, P. 
Sarin, C. 
Sabo, Arthur 
Sandnes, Oscar 
Sather. John 
Schwortz, Peter 
Schroeder, Paul 
Slewertsen, M. C. 
Selmer. K. K. 
Seyfrled. M. 
Sorensen, Janie.s 
Sorensen, Geo. 
Sorensen, Maurltz 
Rtenfors, G. 
Stratton, H. J. 
Strand, A. E. 
Sverdrup. Walter 
Swanson. Ruben 
SIgvartsen, A. 
Slmonsen. A. S. 
Smith, Emil 
Seibert. Henry 
Sorensen. Carl 
Stein. J. 
Saxley. C. H. 
Sivertsen, Karl 
Talleson. Kr. 
Tamls. J. 
Thorsen. Chr. 
Thiel. Werner 
Thorstensen. Carr 
Thomson. Hans 



SM O K" F R ^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
lYl V-f rv IL. rv O box in which you are served. 

Issued by Aultioia>'Oi the Cigar Makers' Imernalionai Union of Amenci 

Union-made Cigars. 

(EhlS CInlillfS Iriilth.Ci9iiicOT*nei)inili'ibc«n*<ib«tonrttl7«rll5lCUSSW0IWH(l 
aWMBtnOr IM(fclCA((MA«[RS'l«UI>«AIIOIUlUNI0«ill ft»«liC4. lBOrMllr!Jt«>llllevolei)t«ll.lld- 

wnantnl ol ihs MORAi MAHRnima iKiaUCl Wl ndlARl Of TKf CBArT. Ilnftfort M lecoBMrt 



I imAin ihrojqhoul the world 
All lAlliAfeiMMl upon Utii LlOcI Mil be puni&hed luordinq to Ultf. 



1/ CHIU^l 



tf^mthtm 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

I* the place for a good and quick eervlce 



233 Second Street, Eureka. 

Teddy S Hagan 

Proprietor* 



Cal. 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigara. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturera of all klnda of Soda. 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



A GOOD CUP'OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTER 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING SHOES, HATS, RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

307 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 U. St., Eureka. Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trad* at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirta, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F. St., Aberdeen, Waah. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATg. 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goodi 

Orders Taken for Madc-to-Measure 

Clothing 

Huotari & Co. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond. Wash. 



Phone 263 



"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST.. HOQUIAM, WASH. 



Tergensen, A. N. 
TIrnqvlst, H. 
Tauminen, John 
Trygg. G. 
Treaner, Chas. A. 
Thern, Arvld 
Thai, Richard 
Tergersen, E. 
l^nkila, Paul 
Valentlnsen. G. 
Walberg. John 
Walsh. P. J. 
Westerlund, .Mbert 



Wlemers, H. M. 
Wold, S. 
Wurst, Walter 
Williams, T. C. 
Walker, H. W. 
Walker, J. H. 
Woodley. Clltloni 
Wellbrook, Henry 
WInstrom, Oscar 
Wold, J. J. 
Zllenk, A. 
Zellnk. A. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Photo by Terkelson & Henry 



SEAMEN! 

Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

Invites All Seamen to His Up-to-Date Store in 
the New Southern Pacific Building 

20 and 22 STEUART ST., S. F. 

MERCHANDISE COVERING THE WANTS 

OF ALL SEAMEN 

Uniforms, Hats, Caps and Shoes 

WATERPROOF OIL SKINS 
and RUBBER BOOTS 

Come In and Inspect My Entire New Stock of 
UNION MADE GOODS 



Home News 



The value of churcli property in 
the United States exempt from taxa- 
tion in 1916 was $1,650,000,000, ac- 
cording to Director Samuel L. Rogers 
of the United States Census Bureau. 
The intrinsic value of the .Ameri- 
ian silver dollar reached 100 cents 
for the first time since the carh 
70's on September 13. The United 
States mint paid $1.04 an ounce on 
that day. 

President Wilson has fixed I lie 
price of newsprint paper used in 
printing: the daily Ofificial Bulletin at 
2y', cents a pound. The price asked 
by the International Paper Company 
was 3 cents a pound. 

The price of copper was fixed at 
23^ cents per pound by President 
AVilson after a conference with op- 
erators, who agreed to exert every 
effort to keep up production, sell at 
the same price to public and gov- 
ernment, and refrain from reducing 
wages. 

Exploitation of the .American flag 
for profiteering was charged by the 
Federal Trade Commission against 
the Association of Flag Makers of 
America, which includes 20 of the 
largest manufacturers in the country. 
The Commission claims that the 
association has violated the "unfair 
competition" clause of the Anti-TrusI 
law. 

There were 81 pounds of sugar 
per capita in the home markets of 
the Ignited States during the fiscal 
year ended June 30 last, as against 
78 pounds in 1916, and 89 pounds 
the year before the war. The average 
ijrice of the imported sugar, the bulk 
of which came from Cuba, was 4'j 
cents a pound, an increase of 112 per 
cent, in three years. 

Congresswoman Jeannette Rankin, 
speaking before the House Committee 
on Mines, charged the Anaconda 
Copper Mining Company with check- 
ing the production of copper through 
refusal to negotiate with its em- 
ployes. She declared that the com- 
pany discharges men who complain 
of working conditions or attempt to 
join a union. At election times it 
coerces the men to support its can- 
didates. She demanded that the Gov- 
ernment take over and operate the 
corporation's property. 

The prosperity of the banking 
business is evidently very great, as 
the following statement proves: The 
Comptroller of Currency granted 
twenty-four charters for new national 
banks last month. The aggregate 
capital was $1,2.S.^,000, as compared 
with sixteen charters, with a capital 
of $995,000, the previous year. Seven- 
teen aijplications were made last 
month compared with twenty-one the 
previous year. Thirteen national 
banks increased their capital by $2,- 
775,000, compared with six last year. 
No banks reduced their capital last 
nionlh. 

Complete returns for June of the 
ojieration of all railroads of the 
country having an annual income ol 
more than $1,000,000 show earnings 
greater than had been forecist :ifn\ 
place June far ahead as the rail- 
roads' banner month. Revenues tn 
taled $349,739,636, as compared with 
$300,019,080 a year ago, and ex- 
penses aggregated $235,890,773, leav- 
ing net operating of $114,148,863, an 
increase of $10,350,000 over June, 1916. 
Operating income, after deducting 
taxes and uncollectible bills, totaled 
$97,516,514, as compared with $90,- 
()()9,681 in June, 1916. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Concrete ships 200 feet long and 
costing under $100,000 arc to lie 
constructed by a syndicate at Mon- 
treal formed under the name of 
Atlas Construction Company. It is 
said they will be ready in less than 
three months. 

A four-masted schooner left Bos- 
ton recently for the South to load a 
full cargo of Virginia smoking and 
chewing tobacco, which she will de- 
liver at a French port. This to- 
bacco is intended for the use of the 
American troops in France. 

A circular has been issued by the 
Department of Commerce postponing 
for a period of two years from 
September 1, 1917, the time for in- 
spection of foreign built vessels 
brought under American registry 
under the Act of 1914. 

The growth of Canadian shipbuild- 
ing is shown by the fact that, while 
43,345 tons were turned out in 1914, 
it is anticipated that the returns for 
1917 will show a threefold increase. 
The Canadian Register of Shipping 
for the past year records 942,598 
tons, and shipyards are now busier 
than they have ever been since 
the days of the wooden vessels, and 
it is safe to say that, as a result of 
the war, steel shipbuilding will be- 
come a great industry. 

As a result of the export embargo 
three Danish steamers laden with 
oil cakes have been held up at 
Hampton Roads for the past six 
weeks. They are the "Uflfe," "Har- 
ald" and "Knud II." After loading 
their cargo at Galveston about two 
months ago the steamers laid up 
there for a while, but with the 
prospects of the embargo going into 
effect they sailed for Newport News. 
Several attempts have been made 
to obtain permission for the steam- 
ers to sail, but all efforts have thus 
far proved futile. The "UfFe" ar- 
rived July 14, the "Harald" July 15 
and the "Knud 11" July 12. 

Cuba's gift ships, the "Bavaria," 
"Adelheid" and "Olivant," recently 
presented to the United States Gov- 
ernment by Cuba, are now flying the 
American flag. Final official tests of 
the vessels' machinery, which the 
Germans had put out of gear before 
surrendering the steamers last April, 
have been made and it is reported 
that the tests were very successful. 

Great Britain and France have lost 
their fight to have all their ships, 
now in American yards, returned to 
the original ownership. The repre- 
sentatives of the British and French 
governments have been arguing, ever 
since the Federal commandeering 
program went into effect, that their 
ships should be returned to them so 
that they could finish the construc- 
tion and operate them. The mem- 
bers of the Shipping Board feel that 
the primary obligation of the Ameri- 
can government is to its own troops 
in France, or to the troops which 
soon will be there; that the Govern- 
ment must leave nothing undone to 
insure a maintenance of the line of 
communication across the Atlantic 
Ocean, and that all ships now being 
built must be kept at the disposal 
of the United States. Where the 
needs of the Allies prove greater 
than those of the United Slates, ex- 
ceptions may be made, but each case 
will be considered on its merits, and 
the policy of the American govern- 
ment will be to finish all ships in 
American yards, with the idea that 
they shall fly the American flag. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 
Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Moniber of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. Cor. Halght and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1917 

Assets ........ $64,566,290.79 

Deposits ....... 61,381,120.63 

Reserve and Contingent Funds . - . . 2,185,170.16 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 259,642.88 

Number of Depositors ------ 65,717 



San Francisco Letter Li»t. 

Lellcrs at tlie San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Oflice are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Oflice at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of llieir destination. 



Jorgensen, Carl W. Joyce. "W. 
Jorgensen, Walther Junge, Rob. 



Aagaard, A. W. 
Abahng, Matlas 
Abrahamson, Alfred 
Aliiers, H. 
Albers, George 
Albert, J. C. 
Alberisen, Peter S. 
Albrechl. Chas. 
Allen, £llis 
Allen, James 
Allen. VV. A. 
Andersen, Carl 
Andersen, K. P. 
Andersen, Martin 



Andersen. O. 

Anderson, A 

Anderson, A 

Anderson, AUred 

Anderson, Andrew 



1118 
2031 



Anderson, Chas. 

Anderson, Frank 

Anderson, Fied 

Anderson, Henry 

Anderson, Nils 

Anderson, 

Anderson, 

Anderson, 

Andersson 

Andersson 

Andersson, 

Andersson, 

Andreasen, 

-1477 
Anshmit, Martin 
Antonsen, Carl 
Auzin, A. -3G3 
Aylward, James 



P, 

Victor E. 

Wilford 
A. -lutiO 
Carl A. 
E. -17S1 
N. A. -4 
Hans 



Beselin, £d. 
Binder, Herbert 
Blomberg, Henry 
Boisen, Jorgen 
Borg, A. 
Bos, J. -2330 
Bovver, Gosia 
Boyce, Robert 
Brandt, H. 
Brevick, John 

Christiansen, Louis 
Chrislianson, Sam 
Christoftersen, G. 
Connolly, Obirt 
Corcoran, C. L.. 



Baardson, Frank 
Baker, C. 
Barry, William J. 
Beckford, David 
Berggren, Oscar 
Bergman, Werner 
Berk, E. W. 
Bertelson, Oskar 

-2184 
Berthelsen, Charles 

Campbell, G. 
Carlson, T. F. 
Carmell, G. 
Cederlof, Knut 
Chilcott, G. 
Christensen, O. G. 

Dahlgren, W. A. Heswert, Wni. 

Dahlgren, William DettlofI, W. G. 
Lianlelsen, Louis M. Dracar, E. 

Danielson, Eric Dracar, Ivan Z. 

Davey, Chas. Dumas. C. 

Degroot, George Dunkel, Charley 

De Rose, E. W. Dunn, Walter 

Eaton, Isaac N. Engelen, D. A. 

Kklund, Gus. Erickson, Alf. 

Ekslrom, Viktor 

Farrell, Bernard Fredholm, Chas. J. 

Farrell. Harry Fredriksen, Birgler 

Fernold, H. V. Fredrickson, Martin 

Fergerson, Thomas Freiberg, Karl 

Fjellman, George Friljerg, Fred 

Flotten, James G. Friberg, Peter 

Forsberg, Sven Frlck, H. C. 

Franke, Charlie Fritag, Will 



Cadsley, F. L. 
(Janser, Joe 
Gardner, Hans 
Gasch, Wm. 
Globe, John 
Gerard, Albert 
Gonarshang, G. 
Gottwold, Gus 
Grabower, Martin 
Graham, W. F. 



Gran, A. 

(Jranstrom, Nestor 
Gray, Hamilton 
Green, J. 
Gregoliet, Ed. 
Gregory, Antonio 
Gunderson, George 
Gunderson, J. 
Gunderson, John 



Hacklin, Ragnar Helgesen, George 
Hagberg, Gust. Hellman, H. W. 

Hagsledt, Charles Hendersen, H. 
Hahne, Wilhelm B. Henderson, R. 
Halbeck, Oscar Hendriksen, John 

Halvarsen, O. -1167Henke, Ernest 
Hammer, Henry Henkelman, K. 



Hansen, A. -lOGO 
Hansen, Axel H. 
Hansen, Carl 
Hansen, J. -2354 
Hansen, J. -2166 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, Nick 
Hansen, Pagaard 
Haraldsen, Alf 
Harburg, Walter 
Haugen, Hans C. 
Hegg, Birger 
Heinonen, Kusta 
Heinrich. Richard 



Henriksen, Harald 
Herman, David 
Hermansson. C. P. 
Hole, Sigvald 
HofT, Axel 
Holm. O. 
Holmgren, C. 
llolmiiuist. Victor 
Holmstrom. Hjal- 

mar 
Hiiod, Charles 
Horton. Bert 
Hiibertz, Emil 
Hughes, W. L. 



Ingebrithsen, Alfred Isberg. Wiektar 
Isaacson. J. Ivertsen. Sigvald B 



.Jackisch, M. 
Jacklin, Chas. 
Jacobsen, Chas. 
Jacobsen, Emil 
Jacobs, Henry 
Jakobsen, M. 
Jansson, Fredrlk 
Jarzombeck, J. 
Jespersen. Martin 
Johanesen. Arvid 
Johannessen, A. 
-1487 



Johansen. 

Johiin.sen, 
.Joliansen, 
.Tohansen, 
Joliansen, 
Jolianson, 
Johnson, 



0\mncr 

Hans 
H. V. 

Ole 

T. A. 

Axel 
Arnold 



Johnson. G. M. 
Johnson. John 
Johnsson, C. J. 
Jonsson, P. W. 
Jordan, O. 



Kaktin, E. 
Kallas, A. 
ivaliberg, Arvid 
Kalnln, J. 
Karlsen. Hans 
Ivarlsen, Olof 
Kessa, Theo. 
KindlunU. Ulto 
Kinney, Fred. P. 
ivipste, (.'barley 

Lanner, Oscar B. 
Larsen, Herman 
Lrursen, J. 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, Kogner 
Larson, Carl 
Larsson. Adolf 
Larsson, Alfred R. 
Larsson, Kagnar 
Lassen, Alf 
L^st, Paul 
Ledsten. Chas. 
Leidecker. E. 
i^inder. V. 
Lindberg, W. 

Maatta, John 
JVUcchi, Willy 
•Vladsen, Holm 
.ilagnuson, Carl 
.Maki, Ivar 
Maimstrom, E. 
Marckwardl, Carl 
Marquardl, Henry 
Mai liiulale, John 
Marllnesen, L. 
Martin, J. F. -2604 
Martui. R. F. 
McDermot, William 
McKeoun, Thos. 
McNeil, D. R. 

Nelsen, C. -936 

Nelsen, Olai 

Nelson, A. 

Nelson. A. W. 

Nelson. B. E. 

Nelson. Joseph 

Nelson, Wm. 

Nelsson, A. -1141 

Ohm, Jolin 
Olausen, Christ. 
oLeary, John 
Ohland, Chas. 
Ulesen, Chas. 
Olesen, F. C. 
Olsen, Albert 
Olsen, B. 
Olsen, C. M. 
Olsen, E. F. 



Kjeli, John 
Klinleberg. Stenof 
Klotz. Arnold 
Klotzke, Otto 
Knitzer, A. 
Kofter, Jack 
Koski, Juho 
Kroon, R. W 



Krumese, Adam 



1142 



1280 



Lind, Gustaf A. 
Liverdal, G. 
Lohne. Evan 
Lorentzeen, Krist 
Lorin. Christian 
Lorngren. Karl 
Lund. E. 

Lundeeii, Eric F. 
Ludewig. Ed. 
Lunderwold. Finn 
Lundiiuist. Axel 
Lundquist, C. A. 
Lutke, Carl 
Lynch, E. J. 
Lynd. Charly 

Melander, G. L. 
Mikelsen, Mickey 
Mikkelsen. Jack 
Mikkelson. Peter 
Miller. R. E. 
Mertheus. H. 
Mohr. Chas. 
Monroe. John 
Monson, Ed. 
Moonan, Thos. 
ivioore, H. 
Moore, Wm. 
Mott, G. 
Montelro, Joe 



Keuman, John 
Nichaus, E. 
Niejahr, Oskar 
Nielsen, Bendix 
Nilson, Nils H. 
Nilson, O. 
Norberg, J. A. 

Olsen, George 
Olsen, O. -1123 
Olsen, Ole 
Olsen, K. B. 
Olsen, Siegfried 
Oltmann, Theodore 
Osen, Aksel 
Osterburg, J. F. 
Osterhoft, H. 
Osterholm, J. W. 



Olsen, F. -124S( 

Palm, A. 
Palu, G. 
Patreka, A. 
Pedeisen, Conrad 
Pedersen, Henrik 
Pederson, S. R. 
Peise, G. 
Peterer, Joseph 
Petersen, Chris 
Peterson, R. T. 

Ramstad, Andreas 
Randropp. John 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rehs, Paul 
Retal, Otto 
Rlesbeck, Hjalmar 
Ries, Robert B. 

Sanne. Rudolph 
Saunders, Chas. 
Savage, Roland 
Schamni. Charles 
Schippman, Herman 
Schuiiz, Albert 
Schulze, Hans 
Schwartz, Karl 
Schwendt, Walde- 

mar 
Skoglund, Harry 
Smitli, Anton 
Spets, Karl 
Sprogoi, T. 



I'eterson, Viktor 
Petterson, O. 
Pettersson, Konrad 
Phantsih, C. 
Pihistrom, R. J. 
Pollock, T. 
Porter, Henry 
Postuma, K. 
Pusner. W. T. 

Rlnker, P. 
Rollo, R. 
Rosenblad. Axel 
Hosenblad. E. A. 
Ruff. Paul A. 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Ruthberg, Edward 

Staaf. Louis 
St. Clair. Chris. 
St. Clair. Thomas 
Stevenson, A. 
Strand. Emil 
Strom. Vatter 
Swanson. B. 
Swanson. J. -1013 
Swanson. John L. 

V. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swlnka. Albert 
Syversen. Oskar 



Tamisar. Peter 
Tamlnga. H. 
Taugel. R. -876 
Tellefssen, A. R. 
Thaysen, A. 
Thee, Rudolph 
Thompson, Benjami 
Tlionu'son. Oiie 
Thorsen, Herman 
Thorsen. Tor. 
Van Bargen. F. 
Veerkamp, J. J. 
Vejooda, F. 
Walenlus. Karl E. 
Wallin, Bercer 
Wally. .\n<ire\v J. 
Walter. John 
Wank, Roman 
Ward, Jack 
Zahnke. Paul 
Zeaberg, Jack 
Ylinin, Samuel V. 



Tjersland, Sverre 
Tonnesen, Andreas 
Tormesen. A. 
Torrance. John 
Torstensen. Barny 
Trovlck. Marolu 
nTwede, J. 
Tweedale. T). S. 
Tysk, J. H. 

"Vickery. Curtis 
Vrikl. Silas 

Wege, Williams 
Wenzel, Albert 
Werner, Chas. 
Westerman. A. 
Wilhelmsen, Seth 

Zearb, W. -6 
Zeritt, John 



WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Pouglas 1619 
Repairing Done While 'You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORD* 




PACKAGES. 



.4.ndersen. Andov 
Berllng, J. B. 
Carlson, John 
Dettloft, W. C. F. 
Kngelen, D. A. 
Grenne, O. H. 
Gunvald.sen. Ingvald 
Jacobsen. Alfred 
Jensen, Hans 
Johansen. T. A. 
Johansson, Werner 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larsen. Ed. 
I^aurlsen. Niels 



Lawberg, A. W. 
Lunilicn. Erii-k F. 
Mar<iuardt, Henry 
Murray, Con. P. 
Myers. W. 
Neumann. H. J. 
Olsen. H. C. 
Olsen. R. B. 
Oslund, O. 
Olsson. C. O. -1101 
Sander. Otto 
Smedsvlk. O. B. 
Thorsen. Thor. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Tom Torgersen, a native of Nor- 
way, age 49, is inquired for by M. 
Thompson & Co., 112 Market St., 
San Francisco, Gal. .\nyone know- 
ing his whereabouts please notify the 
above address. 10-10-17 



Joseph Malcolm Williams (Negro"), 
steamship cook, last heard from at 
Xew Orleans, La., is inquired for by 
liis wife, Mrs. Kato Williams, King 
William St., Georgetown, Karbadoes. 

10-10-17 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Philadelphia" who were on board 
May U, 1917, when Joseph O'Neill, 
alias Peter Mulligan, was killed by 
the falling of an ash bucket, due to 
the defective appliances on said ship 
provided for the purpose of remov- 
ing ashes, will confer a favor upon 
his daughter, Mrs. Marthy Jackson, 
14 Morton Street, New York Gity, 
by communicating with her or her 
attorney, Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broad- 
way, New York City. 10-3-17 



Seamen who were on board the 
S. S. "William Rockefeller" at the 
time of the explosion. May 19, 1917, 
will confer a favor upon Louis G. 
Scaros, seaman, who was seriously 
injured in said explosion, if they will 
communicate with him in care of 
Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, New 
York City. 10-3-17 



Phone Douglas 4J90 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

BANKERS INVESTMENT BUILDING 

Rooms 448-450, Fourth Floor 

Two Entrances: 

742 Market Street 49 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 

Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stork at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: I'nion Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



TIt^ 



^blic 

An International Journal 
Fundamental Democracy 



A clever man said that when 
people speak of "habits" they re- 
fer to bad habits only. As a mat- 
ter of fact habits are both good 
and bad. Personal progress is 
largely a matter of good habits. 
Reading "The Public" is a habit 
which thou--ands of aJert minds 
practice. Why not cultivate this 
invigorating habit yourself? 

Referpnceii: Lincoln Steffens, 
Brand Whitlock, Judge Ben B. 
Lindsay, Ray Rtannard Baker, 
and you — after you have tried it. 

In<rodurtory Off^ri Three 
booklets on the S'Ingletax and 10 
issues of "The Public" only 25c. 

The Public 
122 EnSt 37(h Street N. Y. CHy 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 
400 Rooms, 25, 35 and 50 cents per day, 
or $1.50, $2 to $2.50 per week, with all 
modern conveniences. Free Hot and 
Cold Shower Bath on every floor. Ele- 
vator Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cat. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STRE ET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6348 



Kearny 3863 



JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's OU Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



Phone Kearnv 2518 

HULTEN a RUDOLPH 



Formerly Cutter 
for Tom Williams 



Formerly Tailor 
for Tom Williams 



UNION TAILORS 



SUITS TO 


ORDER 


CLEANING and 


PRESSING 


39 Sacramento Street 


Near Market 


Residence, 1337 


12th Ave. 


Residence Phone, 


Sunset 2957 


HENRY B. 


LISTER 


ATTORNEY 


AT LAW 


805-807 Pacific 


Building 


Phone Douglas 1415 


San Francisco 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Resources .$7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 
Postal Savings Funds 



DIRECTORS 



G. Beleney 
J. A. Bergerot 
S. BIsslnger 
T>eon Bocqueraz 
O. Bozlo 
Charles Carpy 



J. M. Dupas 
,Tohn GInty 
J. 8. Godeau 
Arthur Legallet 
Geo. W. McNear 
X. De Plchon 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN!! 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

is now located in Permanent Quarters 

— at — 

20-22 STEUART STREET 

in the new Southern Pacific Building 



ENTIRE NEW STOCK 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



^r^^^ 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 



•Ale 

ANI> 

Porter 

"^aXa Of America r-ic^xr* 

COPTRIGHT STRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



THIS IS OUR LABEL 



DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 
Union Made 



NOTICE. 



G. Sanguinetti, 2799 Taylor street, 
San Francisco, Cal., has in his keep- 
ing about 20 sailor bags. If these 
are not called for within 30 days, 
they will be disposed of. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HOTEL MELBA 

Connected with Falstaff Restaurant 

UP-TO-DATE FURNISHED ROOMS BY 

THE DAY, WEEK OR MONTH 

Rooms, 25c to $1.00 per Night 

$1.50 to $3.50 per Week 

Hot and Cold Water in Each Room 

Free Bath 

Phone Kearnv 5044 214 JACKSON ST. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



The following members of the 
crew of the "Archer," in 1915, from 
Bellingham, Wash., to the Atlantic 
Coast, are inquired for by M. 
Thompson & Co., 112 Market St., 
San Francisco, Cal.: Peter E. Hed- 
wall, A. Lofstrom, S. Carlson, G. F. 
Larsen, M. Nange, F. Cuplin, W. 
How, Richard Dalzell and Bert 
Tallus. 10-3-17 



Seamen who know about an acci- 
dent to J. Jagershoek, a colored sea- 
man employed on the S. S. "Pala- 
cine," of the Standard Oil Company, 
May 28, 1916, while the vessel was 
at sea, when said seaman fell from 
a ladder the rungs of which were 
covered with paraftine, sustaining 
thereby a broken leg and other in- 
juries, will confer a favor by com- 
municating with the undersigned, at- 
torney for said seaman, or with the 
nearest Union delegate or agent of 
the E. & G. S. Assn. S. B. Axtell, 
1 Broadway, New York. 9-26-17 



PACIFIC NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Study for your license with a practical Shipmaster and 

Up-to-Date Navigator 
Pupils studying with me will receive personal attention 

CAPTAIN A. B. SOWDEN, 

Rooms 340-41 Montgomery Block 
Corner Montgomery and Washington Streets San Francisco 



News from Abroad 



RELLEHER &t BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 

716 MARKET STREET— at Third and Kearny 



SUITS TO ORDER, 
$30.00 TO $50.00 

Union Made 
in Our Own Shop 




Weekly Wages 
No Piece Work 

Eight-Hour Work Day 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 

Proprietors 
Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
tAN FRANCISCO 



The Transatlantic Company of 
Stockholm, Sweden, has closed a 
contract with Lindenholmcns Vaerk- 
stads for four steamers to be de- 
livered in 1921. The aggregate ton- 
nage is 15,000. This will make 42,000 
tons that this shipyard has under 
construction for the Transatlantic 
Company. 

Lord Rhondda, British Food Con- 
troller, in an interview with the 
London correspondent of the Am- 
sterdam "Handelsblad," declares that 
the submarine campaign is no longer 
causing anxiety regarding England's 
bread supply. "In one respect," re- 
marked the Food Controller, "the 
submarine campaign is a blessing. It 
has acted as a stimulus to cultiva- 
tion, so that within a year the Uni- 
ted Kingdom will be practically in- 
dependent of imports, so far as the 
chief foodstuffs are concerned." 

How nearly 100 American sea- 
men, destitute victims of submarine 
sinkings, are living on the heacli 
near Amsterdam, making a living the 
best way they can and waiting for 
opportunities to ship for home, was 
told recently by James Potter, of 
Maiden, Mass., a member of the 
crew of the Norwegian steamer 
"Kongsli," submarined twenty miles 
ofT the Dutch coast last spring. Pot- 
ter say-s he had to wait three months 
to get passage back to the United 
States because of the demoralization 
of Dutch shipping. 

A dispatch from Amsterdam states 
that German newspapers received 
there contain the report that the 
North German Lloyd has sold to a 
Norwegian company for 7,000,000 
kroner the liner "Brandenburg," 
which has been tied up at Trondlijem 
for three years. The "Brandenburg" 
is of 7532 tons gross, built in 1901. 
At the outbreak of the war she was 
in Philadelphia, ready to sail for 
Bergen with a cargo of coal. She 
slipped to sea shortly after hostili- 
ties were declared and succeeded in 
reaching Norway. 

By proclamation published in the 
Union "Government Gazette" the 
Cape Town Docks are a prohibited 
area. A Dock Commandant has 
been appointed, having wide powers 
over all persons, vessels, and goods 
within the area. All persons must 
obtain a permit from him for entry 
to the area, which they shall enter 
or leave only by the main gates, the 
Ebenezer Road Gate, or the North 
gates. Intoxicants are prohibited 
within the area, except as ships' 
stores or for export. The regula- 
tions provide for a fine or imprison- 
ment for contravention of the regu- 
lations. 

The building of wooden vessels is 
now under way in Denmark, and, 
althougii the start is small the ex- 
periment will be puslied. The de- 
cision in this matter has been has- 
tened by the submarine warfare of 
Germany. At many ports in Den- 
mark temporary arrangements have 
been made for the laying down of 
wooden ships. Many industries arc 
threatened with stoppage due to the 
lack of raw materials, and the work- 
ers can thus be given employment 
at the shipyards building these new 
vessels. The type being constructed 
is a standard one, being of three to 
four masts, and having a loading 
capacity of 500 to 600 tons. These 
boats will also be provided with a 
motor. There are ten of this class 
of vessel now being built. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits 



Reverse English. — "Did he start 
anytliing when you asked if you 
could marry his daughter?" 

"I should say so. He started to 
shake my hand off." — I.ife. 



All in the Family. — Prof. — Fresh- 
man, why don't you take notes in 
my course? 

'20— My father took this same 
course and I have his notes. — Chap- 
arral. 



lUisiness Opportunities in Mexico. 
— The following was received by a 
local firm of manufacturing plumb- 
ers: 

Mexico City, 19 January. 
More than one caballero: 

Might I impress with pleasure the 
above peoples to dispatch Juan Var- 
gas completely enumeration of, 
shower washes befitting bathing 
rooms. It should be the impress of 
shower washes in American club 
for Mexico City. Rapidly can the 
above peoples say yes. 

With purity of heart, 

Juan Vargas & Sons. 

169'/4 Las Calles Independencia, 
Mexico City. — Buffalo News. 



.Apparently He Did.— In San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., there was a prominent 
lawyer who prided himself on his 
astuteness in questioning Chinese 
witnesses. He was very near-sight- 
ed, so failed to note that the dress 
of a Chinese witness was of finer 
texture than that worn by an or- 
dinary coolie. 

Instead of asking the usual ques- 
tions as to age, occupation, etc., the 
following dialogue ensued; 

Q. What is your name? 

A. Sell Lung. 

Q. Do you live in San Francisco? 

A. Yes. ' 

Q. You sabe God? 

A. Mr. Attorney, if you mean do 
I understand the entity of our 
Creator, I will simply reply that 
on Thursday evening next I shall 
address the State Ministerial Asso- 
ciation upon the subject of the Di- 
vinity of Christ, and shall be pleased 
if you will attend. — Case and Com- 
ment. 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two Individuals, for Instance, 
nmn and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw apralnst 
tlie account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Do you like a good, long, cool 
smoke? If so, get a package of 
Bagley's Lime Kiln Club Cut 
Plug for your pipe. Manufac- 
tured by John J. Bagley & Co. 
for over fifty years. 



^S£g>i Alt 1 

&jMtH iva4t&t lVi3.C16 




Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House. San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OI.U AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOI. 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HKNKY TAYl-OR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a. sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law. and is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be. even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-Informed man, and In a 
comparatively sliort interval of time. 




HENRY HEINZ 



Phone Douglas 67S2 



ARTHUR HEINZ 

Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



Diamonds 

Watches ^ 64 market street 

High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN &t CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 

NOTICE ! BOSS OF ROAD OVERALLS 

PRICE, FROM 85 CENTS UP 

Phone Douglas 1737 



Christensen's Navigation Scliool 




Established 190« 
NSFORD BLDG., 268 MARKET STREET 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 



UNION MADE FOR UNION MEN ^ 

PRICES 



H 
O 
E 

S 



58 THIRD ST., S. F. 



H 
O 



Our Specialties 



PERFECT FIT 
LONG WEAR 
ABSOLUTE COMFORT 



THEY HAVE THE UNION LABEL 



Silverware, Cut Glass and Clocks for Wedding 

Presents 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

James Ji.Sorensert Big Stock— Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

-^'f-""*/'"*;. . THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

.nd'th. CMm.. FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



WHEN 

THE TOY SEASON 

OPENS 

Remember that, de- 
spite difficulties in ob- 
taining Toys equal to 
those of former years, 
the slogan that has 
made Hale's famous 
will apply just as here- 
tofore. 




FOR TOYS 



Market at Fifth 



H. SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 

FURNISHING GOODS 

676 Third Street 

NEAR TOWNSEND. S. F. 



I want you 
Seamen 
to wejir 



BL^i^^ Union 

^j^^k Hats 

J^^^^^k $2.50, 
^^^^^^^ $5.00 

"YOUR HATTER- 
FRED AMMANN 

Deserves Your Patronage 



Union Store 
Union Clerks 



72 Market Street 

Next to Ocean Market 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BCD SCAL CIGAB CO., riANUrACTUBCIS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglat 1660 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 

toMUTSH 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
OfiBcial Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 








A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXXI. No. 6. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1917. 




Whole No. 2456. 



LABOR'S PROGRESS IN CALIFORNIA. 



Report of Delegates to the State Federation Convention. 



The delegates in attendance at the recent 
convention of the California State Federation 
of Labor, representing the Sailors' Union of 
the Pacific, the Marine Firemen's, Oilers and 
Watertenders' Union of the Pacific, the Ma- 
rine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific Coast, and the Alaska Fishermen's Un- 
ion, have submitted the following joint report 
to their respective organizations: 

San Francisco, Cal., October 8, 1917. 

As your delegates to the 18th Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor vife submit the following report: 

The Convention was called to order on Mon- 
day, October 1, at 10 a. m., in the auditorium 
of the Sacramento Labor Temple, by Past 
President D. D. Sullivan, Chairman of the Con- 
vention Committee, who introduced R. L. En- 
nis. President of the Sacramento Federated 
Trades Council, as temporary chairman of the 
Convention. D. W. Carmichael, President of 
the Board of City Commissioners, and Robert 
E. Callahan, Chairman of the Sacramento 
County Board of Supervisors, also welcoiucd 
the delegates. The invocation was then de- 
livered by Rev. Father Wm. F. Ellis. 

In addition to the comprehensive annual re- 
ports of the Officers and the General Organ- 
izers, 40 propositions were introduced by the 
delegates and acted upon by the Convention. 
The Legislative Report and the Labor Record 
of members of the last Legislature was also 
presented for the consideration of the delegates. 

Increase in Membership. 

According to the report of the Secretary- 
Treasurer 498 local unions and 21 labor councils 
with a membership of 71,500 are now affiliated 
with the Federation, an increase of 3,500 over 
the previous year. The greatest progress has 
been made among the oil workers. Encour- 
aging reports were also received from Humboldt 
county and from Los Angeles. 

A feature of this year's Convention was the 
attendance of representatives from the Farmers' 
Educational and Co-operative Union of America, 
and from the Pacific Co-operative League. 
After hearing addresses from some of these 
gentlemen and a discussion from the floor, it 
was decided to co-operate with these organiza- 
tions to bring about a plan to eliminate unnec- 
essary middlemen in the buying and selling of 
commodities, and to further legislation beneficial 
to all concerned. A conference committee of 
fifteen, five from the farmers, five from the co- 
operators and five from the Federation, will 
continue to map out details between conven- 
tions. 

The Convention went on record as standing 
squarely behind the President of our country in 
the great world war, and unanimously pledged 
itself to make the second liberty loan drixe a 
success. 

Resolutions were also adopted coineying to 
Senator La Follette "confidence in his integrity 
and loyalty as a true American citizen, even 
though he differ with the great body of labor 
and our people on some questions of the war." 

Many newspapers have misrepresented the. ac- 
tion of the Convention in this respect. We 



therefore submit the resolution, as adopted, in 
full: 

The La Follette Resolution. 

"Whereas, Recent articles in the public press 
note the condemnation and even the intended 
impeachment of United States Senator Robert 
M. La Follette of Wisconsin, in the United 
.States Senate, on account of his minority stand 
on certain issues of our present war; and, 

"Whereas, The great body of the American 
lalior movement yields to none in its loyalty 
and fealty to our Nation in this, her hour of 
need; and, 

"Whereas, The long years of experience and 
deep friendship between Senator La Follette 
and organized labor, in whose cause no truer 
friend has labored, directs the California State 
Federation of Labor in its Eighteenth Annual 
Convention, in regular session assembled, in the 
city of Sacramento, in speaking a message of 
calmness and tolerance to all citizens of our 
land, during this great war crisis; therefore, be 
it 

"Resolved, That we ask for Robert M. La 
F"ollette the greatest right of all democracy, a 
right to be heard, a right to express the views 
of an intelligent minority, for on this rock is 
founded all liberty. 

"Resolved, That we convey to Senator La 
Follette our confidence in his integrity and 
loyalty as a true American -citizen, even though 
he difTer with the great body of labor and our 
people on some questions of the war." 

The so-called "bomb" cases in San b'rancisco 
were discussed at great length, and much feel- 
ing was displayed by many of the delegates in 
speaking of these now famous cases. Follow- 
ing is the Convention's final action: 

"Resolved, That this, the Eighteenth Annual 
Convention of the State Federation of Labor 
in session assembled in the city of Sacramento, 
most heartily approves the action of the Presi- 
dent of the United States in the sending of 
the commission to .San Francisco, and pledges 
loyal support through the good offices of the 
President and Secretary of the State Federa- 
tion of Labor, as well as co-operation in any 
effort tending to prevent a miscarriage of justice. 

"Resolved, That we call upon the Mayor of 
San Francisco to also lend his good offices 
along with the Governor of the State of Cali- 
fornia, as well as the Attorney-General of the 
State of California, to the end that at the con- 
clusion of this investigation it shall be apparent 
that all of the facts be brought to ligiit. Ex- 
pressing once again our confidence in the inno- 
cence of those accused, we feel sure that this 
investigation will result in general good, as it 
will undoubtedly bring to light the darkest 
deeds of public officials ever attempted in the 
name of law and order." 

District Attorney Fickert Scored. 

A resolution was also adoiitcd denouncing the 
attempt of Charles M. Fickert to prevent his 
recall election. 

Another resolution relating to the persecution 
of workingmen was adopted and is herewith 
submitted for your careful consideration: 

"Whereas, An ever-increasing number of de- 



fenseless individuals and groups of workers are 
being subjected to ruthless persecution under 
guise of law; and 

"Whereas, Vast sums of money are raised 
by organizations of employers for the execu- 
tion of such unjust purposes as the disruption 
of organizations of labor, and to ruin the repu- 
tations of individuals devoted to the cause of 
labor; and, 

"Whereas, Organizations of labor are forever 
contributing large sums of money to a more 
or less disorganized and inefficient defense of 
the said victims of such persecutions; 

"Resolved, By the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor in Convention assembled that we 
hereby instruct our delegate to the American 
Federation of Labor Convention to work for 
the establishment of a permanent department of 
statistics and publicity to take care of all such 
problems herein mentioned." 

A resolution expressing condemnation of the 
I. W. W. was approved after being amended 
from the floor to prevent any misconstruction 
of the original language it contained. The reso- 
lution recommends expulsion of I. W. W.'s 
from all A. F. of L. Unions. 

The proposed Constitutional Amendment 

which, if passed, will enable the Legislature to 

perfect a plan providing for a system of Social 

Insurance was endorsed after a lengthy debate. 

Jury Reform Under Consideration. 

The proposed Jury Reform measure was re- 
ferred to the Executive Council to determine 
whether it is advisable to have the measure 
submitted to the people through the initiative, 
or have a law enacted l)y the Legislature. 

An effort to secure a one day of rest in 
seven law satisfactory to all workers will also 
be considered by the Executive Council. 

After hearing the representatives of the Iron 
Trades Council a resolution was introduced and 
subsequently adopted endorsing the lr(jn Trades' 
effort to better their conditions and dcnouncin.g 
those who sought to stigmatize our people as 
lacking in loyalty to our country in these dis- 
tressing times. 

The Street Carmen's strike in San Francisco 
was unanimously endorsed, and one representa- 
tive of each section of the State was delegated 
to induce every affiliated organization to sup- 
port this strike as liberally as possible but at 
least to the extent of one hour's pay for each 
member. 

A resolution calling attention to the unfair 
product of Henry Sonneborn and Company, 
manufacturers of "Stylcplus" clothing, was en- 
dorsed, and one resolving that the delegates 
go on record asking the editors of labor papers 
and the labor press in general not to accept 
advertising matter from any firm, manufac- 
turer or agent which has been declared as 
I'.nfair to labor. 

Several resolutions looking toward better- 
ments for Post Office Clerks were adopted 
and the Secretary instructed to communicate 
with our representatives in Washington. 

An endorsement of Senator Hiram W. John- 
son was contained in a resolution adopted whicii 
provides that the Federation "extends its full 
and grateful endorsement to Hiram W. Johnson 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



for the stand taken l>y liini 141 the United States 
Senate to the end that the governing powers 
sliould finallx- 'not unly eonscript the blood of 
this Nation,' but also sliould 'eonscript the part 
of the wealth of this Nation that is coined out 
of its blood.' " 

All possible assistance was pledged to the 
newly organized State Hospital Kniployees, by 
the adoption of several resolutions introduced 
by their representative. 

An extremely unpleasant incident occurred 
just prior to the close of the session. Because 
of the fact that A. \V. Brouillet, of Shoe 
Clerks' Union No. 410 of San Francisco, made 
certain charges against Delegate Scharrenberg 
and w-as unable to prove them when called upon 
to do so. a motion was made "that Delegate A. 
W. Brouillet be repudiated by the Convention of 
the California State Federation of Labor," which 
motion was carried. Your delegates are of the 
opinion that the drastic action was taken be- 
cause Delegate Brouillet had. during the con- 
vention, directed charges at several other dele- 
gates, and announced earlier in the week that 
he had come to the convention to "smoke some 
people out." 

.\side from this regrettable episode the Con- 
vention was a marked success in mapping^ out 
Labor's course for the immediate future. There 
were over 200 delegates in actual attendance. 
Many notable visitors addressed the Conven- 
tion. Among these were: Charles G. Johnson 
of the State Bureau of Weights and Measures; 
Brother Donnelly, President of the Arizona 
State Federation of Labor; O. A. Tveitmoe 
of the State Building Trades Council of Cali- 
fornia; M. J. McGuire and Pierre Flaherty of 
the Iron Trades Council; Senator John Inman 
and Assemblyman James Ryan. 

Telegrams were received from various cities 
of this State asking that the next Convention 
be held in their respective localities; also a 
message of greeting and well wishes from 
Bunji Suzuki, President of the Laborers' Friend- 
ly Society of Japan. 

The Convention was cordially received and 
handsomely entertained by the citizens of Sac- 
ramento. The next convention will be held in 
San Diego. Nearly all the incumbent officers 
were re-elected, including President Murphy 
and Secretary Paul Scharrenberg. Daniel D. 
Sullivan, of Pressmen's Union No. 60 of Sac- 
ramento, was chosen as delegate to the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor Convention. The 
Convention adjourned on Saturday, October 6, 
at 12:1.S p. m. 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



Congress adjourned its special session 
after the enactment of more legislation of 
prime importance to the American wage 
worker than has ever been considered in 
any session since the opening of the Civil 
War. True, none of the bills passed was 
described in its title as relating to labor, 
but the fact remains that all of them, 
from the declaration of war to the en- 
actment of the pension plan, directly re- 
late to the progress of the struggle of 
those who produce the world's wealth to 
direct the world's work and to distribute 
more evenly the world's leisure. 

'i'he declaration of war, introduced on 
April 2 and signed by the President on 
April 6, pledged the nation to make the 
world safe for democracy — the rule of 
nations by equal, direct and secret suf- 
frage. If political democracy be the only 
form of democracy that political leaders 
have in mind, not so the leaders of labor, 
in Europe or in America. Nine-tenths of 
them know that out of this war is coming 
a tremendous expansion of bread-and- 
butter democracy, to be brought about 
by political means, both by taxation and 
by removal of private ownership of great 
industries. The man in the shop is going 
to multiply his power over the conditions 
of his own life and the lives of all other 
men. 

The great loan to the Allies, placing 
them to a great extent under American 
Influence as to their future policies, again 
increased the power of American labor in 
the world. Creditors to England, France, 
Italy, Serbia, Belgium and to some extent 



to Russia, the United States is now in a 
position to advise them on how they shall 
maintain their strength. Its advice must 
accord with the spirit of the rising self- 
reliance of the vast majority of the wage- 
workers in America. These men and 
women, who have been gaining advances 
in wages antl decreases in hours of labor, 
want to see similar improvements estab- 
lished all over the world, and particularly 
in those countries whose products will, 
after the war, compete with American 
products in the open market. The possi- 
ble helpful influence of the American 
labor movement is vastly extended through 
the making of this, war loan. 

Congress adopted the conscription plan 
for raising a new army, and at once there 
was drawn into the army a great body of 
men trained in the school of trade-union- 
ism, and whose skill and quality seems 
likely to guarantee that never again will 
the army of the United States be identi- 
fied as soiTiething hostile to, and ignorant 
of the constructive program of, the labor 
movement. To-day's trend is toward the 
comi)lete identification of the conscript and 
volunteer armies with the mass of the 
people. 

If anything were needed to assure the 
fundamental sympathy of the man in the 
military service with his brother in indus- 
trial service, that element is furnished by 
the enactment of the insurance and family 
allowance law. The nation has under- 
taken to keep the soldier's family from 
want while he is away at war, and to 
assure him of a livelihood when he re- 
turns, if he is disabled. He will not have 
to fight for the job of the man who stayed 
behind, either, when the war is done. Im- 
plied in the whole scheme of insurance is 
the idea that the returned soldier will be 
given a chance to earn a livelihood that 
will relieve the Government of further 
payments to his family. England has put 
the guaranty in specific terms. Congress 
will probably do the same in the coming 
session. 

The Food Administration Act, which 
carried with it the creation of the Fuel 
Administration, v^as, like the insurance 
plan, strongly supported by organized la- 
bor. There has been much preliminary 
uneasiness as to how these schemes of 
reducing the high cost of living, and pre- 
venting famine in food and coal this win- 
ter, would work out. Up to the present 
they have not reduced prices to any con- 
siderable extent, but it is probable that 
they have kept prices from going far 
higher. And, what is vitally important, 
the Hoover food administration has made 
certain the preservation of untold millions 
of dollars' worth of food in the United 
States that would otherwise have been 
permitted to spoil, or would have been 
wasted, or would have been shipped out 
of the country without sufficient cause. 

The food administration is going to be 
untler a far greater degree of public con- 
trol, and will distribute food much more 
evenly among the American people, than 
would the commercial go-as-you-please 
which it has abolished. It has put into 
practice another principle of the labor 
movernent — that those who create wealth 
have a fundamental right to food and 
shelter, regardless of market profits. And 
the same rule applies to the fuel control. 
In the latter case, also, the organized coa! 



miners sit at the chief council board, and 
advise the fuel administrator as to the bur- 
den to be borne and the earnings claimed 
by the men who dig and hoist the coal. 
This is a great and permanent gain in 
])owcr for organized labor in the fuel in- 
dustry. 

Congress has done another big thing in 
this session. It has appropriated more 
than $1,000,000,000 to build a merchant 
marine which will be under complete Gov- 
ernment control. The success of the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union in securing the 
Atlantic agreement with the shipping 
companies, this summer, is due at least 
in part to the fact that the com])anies now 
realize that control by the Government 
means better labor conditions on the ships, 
and that if they do not make terms with 
organized labor to-day they will increase 
the chances of direct operation of this vast 
new fleet by the Government, which will 
of course establish fair conditions. 

On the final day of the war session, the 
special committee of Senators that inves- 
tigated the street railway strike of last 
spring in the national capital made its 
report. This report denounces the arbi- 
trary and selfish course taken by President 
King of the Wasliington Railway & Elec- 
tric Co., and calls for either jiublic owner- 
ship or absolute governmental control of 
the street railways of the city as a remedy. 
It declares that had the committee any 
power to do so, it would put back in their 
old jobs the strikers, who have long since 
been defeated. This report, though it 
gives no immediate help to the men who 
struck, gives official denial to the claim of 
street railway managers that they have a 
right to "run their own business." It con- 
tributes to the movement for unionization 
and public ownership of all street railway 
systems. 

The most depressing phase of the ses- 
sion has been the failure of the long fight 
made by Senators Johnson of California, 
Borah of Idaho, Thomas of Colorado, La 
Follette of Wisconsin, and others, against 
press censorship. A free press was one 
of the fundamentals of civil liberty de- 
manded in the manifesto adopted by the 
heads of all of the international unions 
comprising the American Federation of 
Labor, on March 12 last. The last days 
of September saw the adoption of a clause 
in the Trading With the Enemy Act 
which, if administered by the Postmaster 
General as he has administered the Espion- 
age Act, would make him the sole judge 
as to whether an aggressive labor journal 
should live or be put out of business. 
This new law forbids the delivery or cir- 
culation of any paper which has been 
judged by Postmaster General Burleson to 
be non-mailable. Once deprived of the 
mailing privilege, a paper is to be legally 
dead. Several labor papers are said to 
be on the verge of being suppressed unless 
they change their line of comment on the 
policies of the Government in the war 
and in diplomacy. 



The Capitalist press is not one-eyed ; 
oh, no — it has two eyes wide open, one 
always on the main chance and the other 
searching for filth to throw at the workers. 



Good "union made" tobacco is in the 
market everywhere. It is your duty to refuse 
any other. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



"Can't-Strike" Plan Urged by Employers. 

Organized employers inform the Council 
of National Defense that they are "inter- 
ested in the abolishment of strikes," and 
suggest that their latest plan be submitted 
by the council to the trade union move- 
ment. 

It is the old system — ask all and give 
nothing, with their pet scheme — com- 
pulsory arbitration — carefully kept in the 
background, for the time being. 

The proposal was submitted to the 
Council of National Defense by a national 
industrial conference board of 150 mem- 
bers, representing sixteen manufacturing 
associations. 

The employers favor no modification of 
present safety or health standards during 
the war period except upon recommenda- 
tion of the Council of National Defense. 
Wages shall be the standard prevailing 
locally at the beginning of the war except 
where it has been "demonstrated" that in- 
creases are necessary to meet higher liv- 
ing costs. This clause would indicate 
that some employers have their doubts 
about old General High Cost of Living. 

Hours are not to be changed except on 
the word of the Council of National De- 
fense when "it is necessary to meet the 
requirements of the Government." 

All union shop agitation is to be taboo- 
ed under the new system. The employers 
refer to the union shop as "closed shop." 

A board consisting of representative em- 
ployers, employes, and the Government 
will be created and this board is to be 
given sweeping authority : "With full 
power to create all machinery necessary 
to exercise its functions." 

The employers say that trade unionists 
are not abiding by the recommendation of 
President Gompers, that unions shall not 
insist on changing labor conditions during 
the war, so they want action. 

While President Gompers never made 
this statement, and has made repeated 
denials of this ridiculous claim, some em- 
ployers persist in their contrary claims. 

And in the meantime they are waiting 
for labor to accept salvation by the com- 
pulsory arbitration route. 



Conscript Wealth as Well as Men. 

In commenting on the result of the re- 
cent ]\Iinneapolis conference, the Courier- 
News of Fargo, North Dakota, says : 

"The American alliance for labor and 
democracy in its declaration of principles 
adopted at the conclusion of the big con- 
ference in Minneapolis came out strong 
for a number of progressive war measures, 
important among them being 'conscription 
of wealth as well as of men.' This is in 
direct line with the arguments which have 
been presented from time to time by the 
Courier-News and is only another indica- 
tion that the campaign for an even dis- 
tribution of the war burden is bearing 
fruit. 

"It is argued that when the men of the 
nation chosen under the selective conscrip- 
tion plan of the Government are taken to 
the front, they give all they have to give 
— their lives. It is no more than fair then, 



that the man who has been able to amass 
great riches in this country should give 
of what he has, his wealth, and the Gov- 
ernment should demand it if he is not 
willing to give of it freely. Many of the 
great fortunes in the United States have 
been the direct result of the war, and of 
these more than any other demands should 
be made. 

"The American alliance also has a num- 
ber of other ideas in the declaration of 
principles, including heavy taxes on in- 
comes, excess profits and land values. It 
declares for equal sufifrage and insurance 
for sailors and soldiers and demands that 
the Government take quick action with 
regard to speculative interests which have 
taken the war as an excuse to enhance 
the prices of necessity. 

"A committee was appointed to extend 
aid and encouragement to the new Rus- 
sian republic and it is expected that they 
will go to Russia where they will be able 
to make an actual study of conditions and 
needs of the country. 

"All through the meeting in iVlinneapolis 
was a strain of loyalty and in every utter- 
ance and action during the sessions there 
was indorsement of the Government and 
an assurance of the loyalty of the* labor- 
ers. It is only asked that the man who 
works with his hands be given a fair 
deal." 

Weeps for Children. 

W. E. Robinson, a Belaire, Md., canner, 
is heartbroken because the Keating-Owen 
Child Labor law has forced him to employ 
men and women instead of little children. 
In a letter to a local newspaper Mr. Robin- 
son says : 

"Since the first of September I have not 
permitted these boys and girls to work in 
my factory. They are healthful, industri- 
ous youngsters, and the work they have 
been doing was very beneficial to them, 
mentally and physically. But my heart 
aches for them now. Their parents are all 
at work in the factory. Where are these 
husky boys and girls ; what are they do- 
ing? 

"I'he advocates of this Child Labor law 
have undertaken 'a serious responsibility. I 
sincerely trust the Supreme Court of the 
United States will declare it unconstitu- 
tional, and I hope Congress can wake up 
to the absurdity of it, as it now stands, 
and repeal or at least modify it." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Indict Low Wage Plan. 

Low wages and long hours were indicted 
by Probation Officer Heney of the District 
of Columbia, at an unemployed conference, 
under the auspices of the Federal Dei)art 
ment of Labor. 

"I have found," he said, "that much of 
the suffering and the conditions which 
bring petty ofifenders before the courts are 
due to insufficient wages and long hours of 
labor, 'i'hese men are not criminals either 
instinctively or by hereditary traits but 
some contingency has arisen, either sick- 
ness or other misfortune, that they are un- 
able to meet financially and they seek so- 
lace bv methods that land them before the 
courts." 



International .Seamen's Union of Anieriea, 3_'8- 
332 West Randolph .St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of .Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., -Sydney, N. S. \V. 

1 Crawford St,, Duncdin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Otticcs, Port .Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and F'iremen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's .Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, I.iverimol. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes de France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

b'ederation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fryboder-LTnion, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svcnska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

.Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemecne Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
teiiburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione National e dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
\'erband der Handels-Transporl, \'erkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina l.S, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Rcposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marincros, Calla Tngla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
b'edcration Obrera Maritima (Sailors and h'ire- 
nien), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Kemandorcs, Rua 
B;irao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

.Soeiedada Unia dos I'oguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camai a, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 
SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 3S.S Point Koad, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers 



The wages in eastern Siberia are 
83 cents a day, while those in west- 
ern Siberia often are as low as 10 
cents a day. The men in the mines 
of eastern Siberia work morning, 
noon, and night, recognizing neither 
Sunday nor feast day. 

The Danish supreme court has 
confirmed a judgment forcing the re- 
payment of strike benefit amounting 
to 240 kroner (about $65) by a 
former member of a trade union who 
returned to work before the union 
had declared the strike ended. 

The suffrage measure introduced in 
the Canadian Parliament, giving the 
ballot to widows, wives, daughters 
and sisters of soldiers in the 
trenches passed the Commons on 
the 15th by a vote of 53 to 33. 
It is expected to pass the Senate 
without difficulty. 

Complete returns of the recent 
Swedish election indicate a sweeping 
victory for the Socialists and Liber- 
als. The new membership in the 
Riksdag is 86 Socialists, 62 Liberals, 
61 Conservatives, 12 extreme So- 
cialists, and 9 Farmers. The small 
number of extreme Socialists is taken 
to indicate growing strength for 
Branting, the moderate Socialist 
leader. 

Striking telegraphers employed by 
the Great Northwestern Telegraph 
company have forced this concern 
to accept an arbitration award ren- 
dered under the Canadian Indus- 
trial Disputes Investigation Act. 
Both sides accepted the arbitration 
provisions of the law, but when the 
award went against the company it 
pleaded that the board's findings 
were excessive. A short strike 
brought the management to terms. 

Immigration through the port of 
New York during the fiscal year 
1916-17 ending with June 30 showed 
a decrease of 3866 persons compared 
with the previous year and of 1,403,- 
081 as compared with the year 1913- 
14, according to a report made pub- 
lic by Commissioner of Immigration 
Frederic C. Howe. The arrivals last 
year were 362,877 persons, represent- 
ing about one-half of the immigra- 
tion into the United States. All na- 
tionalities with the exception of 
I'rench, Portuguese, Spanish and 
Spanish-.'Xmerican showed correspond- 
ing declines. There was an increase 
of 6239 from France during the last 
year over the year 1914. German 
immigration last year was 9622 per- 
sons, as against 79,871 in 1914. 

During the first week of October, 

1916, that is when the first nine 
municipal kitchens were in working? 
order and the feeding of school 
children had been taken over, the 
number of meals served out daily 
in Berlin was 53,187. In February, 

1917, this number rose to 152,730. 
whereas in the following April it was 
reduced to 117,156. The week that 
closed the year's record, the second 
in July, showed attendance at the 
kitchens to be on the increase again, 
however, for the daily average for 
that period was found to be 171,597. 
The attendance evidently varies con- 
siderably, according to the rations 
obtainable at the moment with the 
various food cards, and the t|uanti- 
ties of food offered for sale on the 
open market. It is stated that a 
number of factories and government 
offices, 110 in all, at the present time, 
purchase food for their employes in 
large quantities from the municipal 
kitchens. 



THE UNION STORES OF THE U. S. A. 

We Manufacture and Sell 

Direct to You the Best Union 

Made Shirts in the World, 

Saving You the Middleman's 

Profit. 



UNION LABEL 

SHIRTS 

NIGHTSHIRTS 

PAJAMAS 

COLLARS 

COLLAR BUTTONS 

UNDERWEAR 

SOCKS 

NECKWEAR 

SUSPENDERS 

ARM BANDS 

GARTERS 

GLOVES 

BELTS 

SUIT CASES 

BAGS 

OVERALLS 

COOKS' GOODS 

WAITERS' SUPPLIES 

BARBERS' COATS 

ASK FOR THE CLERKS' UNION CARD EVERYWHERE 

EAGLESON & CO. 

1118 MARKET STREET, Opposite 7th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

717 K Street, Sacramento 112-116 So. Spring Street, Los Angeles 



Get Our Union Label Catalogue, Endorsed by 

S. F. Labor Council S. F. Label Section 

S. F. Building Trades Council 

California State Building Trades Council 



.WORKERS UNION 



UNIOr^STAMP 

Fictory 



Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON. MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



San Pedro Letter LUt. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BROWN &t SONS 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 
109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



-Aspo, Theo 

Andersen, A. H. 

Anderson, Wilford 
'Aalto. K. A. -1341 
I Andersen, C. E. 
I Andersen, Olaf 

Andersen, Frank 
I -332 

P.utton, R. S. 

Bower, Gosta 

Blomgren, M. A. 
I Bentsen. Hans B. 
I Beler, John C. 

Behrens, Fred 

Brown, Joe 

Bergesen, Slvert 

Brown, G. 

Brien, Hans 

Bentsen, Hans B. 

Carlson, John 

Collins, Ed. 

Carlson, C. V. 

Clirlstensen, A. 

Carlson, R. C. 

Carlson, Gustaf 

Christensen, E. 

Drasbeck, Carl 

Dougal, A. 

Ellison, Samuel 

Emmery, J. A. 

Enstrom, Carl 

Eklund, Swen 

Farrell, H. D. 

Folvig, John 

Fosberg, Leonard 

Gaeve. Willy 

Gieesler. E. 

Gerhardt, John 

Gerard, Albert 

Hill, Chas. 

Ilolmstrom, F. 

Hansen, Bernard 

Hoek, A. 

Hunter, Ernest 

Hagger, F. W. 

Hedman, John M. 

Janssen, Hans E. 

Johnson, S. 

Jansson, H. E. 

.lohansen, Algol 

.lanssen, Bernh. 

Jolianson, N. A. 

Johnson, Gunnar 

Johansen, Fred 

Jansson, Bernhard 

Kartheuser, Otto 

Kernback 

Klotz, Arnold 

Kipper, Henry 

Karre, M. V. 

Kristensen, Niels 

Kind, H. 

Larsen, Slgvard 

Lyngqulst, H. 

I^arsen, Martin 

Laakso, Frank 

Lassen, Johan 

Lorenz, Bruno 

Larsen, Lewy 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

122 Sixth Street, San Pedro 

PROPRIETORS OF 

STANDARD BOTTLING WORKS 

Manufacturers and Bottlers of All Flavors Union Bottler 



LIPPMAN'S 

Head to Foot Clothiers for Men 

Fourteen Years in San Pedro 

532 Beacon Street 
531 Front Street 
Two Entrances 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529/2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated in the sunny 
south Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerichs has established a Navigation School here 
and under his undivided personal supervision students will be thoroughly prepared 
to pass successfully before the United States Steamboat Inspectors. 
TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streeta, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Loa Angeles Examiner and All San 

Franclaco Papers on Sale. Agenta 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR 
BEST ADVERTISERS 

S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing. Cleaning and Pressing 
2d Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



The Anglo- GaliloroiaTrusl Gompdny 

As successors to the SWEDISH-AMERICAN BANK 

offers a particularly convenient service to 

SEA FARING MEN and to the SCANDINAVIAN PEOPLE 

in California 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. 

Main Office: Northeast Cor. MARKET and SANSOME STREETS 

BRANCHES: 

16th and Mission Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS.. $ 1,910,000 

TOTAL RESOURCES 16,000,000 

COMMERCIAL SAVINGS TRUST 



Larsen. L. 
Lund, J. W. M. 
I^abrentz, Max 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Mutka, Anton 
MoUer, Earl R. 
Moller, Christian 
Magnussen, Sigurd 
Marlon, J. 
Mamers. Carl 
Miller, R. E. 
Metz, John 
Mlnners, Herman 
Moberi?, Karl G. 
N. P. -1504 
Olsen, Thomas 
Olsson, O. S. 
Olsen, Ole W. 
Pederson. Chris 
Pashe. John 
Petter, G. 
Pvlkan, William 
Pcra, GustI 
Petersen, Olaf 
Peterson, K. E. 

-903 
Petersen, C. -1493 
Paulsen, James 
Pederson, John 
Peterson, Alfred 
Pedersen. Alf. -1323 
Palmqulst, A. 
Peterson, Hugo 
Paterson, C. V. 
Petersen, N. -1234 
Rosenthal. Walter 
Reuter, Ernest 
Raaum, Harry 
Rivera, John 
Retal, Otto 
Raun, Elnar 
Stolzerman. Emil 
Swanson. E. 
Rhedin, Hans 
Schroeder, Ernest 
Schlleman. F. 
Swartou, Charlie 
Sonnebom, Ben 
Swanson. .Tames 
Solewskl, Franz 
Schroeder, Alfred 
Selander. W. 
Taft, Jes 
Teague, Oscar 
Thygessen, John 
Thomas. Henry 
Thlrup. C. 
Thompson. Maurice 
Thoren, G. A. 
Thompson, Alex 
Wolf, A. E. 
WilR. Theo 
Walker. John 
Warkala, John 
Ysberg. Adolf 

Packages. 
Bluker, John 
Kruger, Wm. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Anderson, Gust H. 
Bohm, Frank 
Brandt, Arvld 
Hohm, Franz 
Carlson, Chas. B. 
Cariera, Peter 
Dully, Alexander 
Elliot, Austin E. 
Fisher, Fritz 
Guldersen, E. 
Gregory, W. 
Geiger. Joe 
Harding, Ellis 
Hyhinder. Gust 
Hartman. Fritz 
limey, Fred 
Jorgensen, Robert 
Jones, H. 
Jchansson, Charles 

-2407 
Johnson, Karl 
Jensen, H. T. 
Kasklnen, Albert 
Kristensen, Wm. 
Kroon, Al. 
Kelly. Wm. 
Knofsky, E. W. 
Laatzen, Hugo 
Larsen, Hans 



Mitchel, J. W. 
Mehrtens, H. 
Nlelson, Carl C. 
Nelson, A. S. 
Olson. David 
Okvlst, Gust 
Oglive, Wm. 
Paulson, Herman 
Palm, P. A. 
Paul, George 
Peterson, M. 
Palmqvlst, Albert 
Petersen, Anton 

-1675 
Rensmand, Robert 
Rasmussen, O. 
Rubins. Carl A. 
Saniuelson, Sam 
Stinesson, Harold 
Siebert. Gust 
Swanson. Oskar 
Swanson. John I.. 
Tuhkanen, Johan 



Westengren, C. 
Wagner, W. M. 
Welllnger, L. 
Warren, Geo. 
Willing, Wm. 



W. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Chris. 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andeson, A. P. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Berdwlnen, Bob 
Bohm, Gust 
Browen, Alexander 
Brogard. N. 
Brun, Mattia 
Brant, Max 
Carlson, Adolph M. 
Crentz, F. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Dltrlch 
Christensen, Loula 
Davis, Frank A. 
Donaldson. Harry 
Ekman, Gust 
Elllngsen, Erllng 
Fattlnger. August 
Fisher, Charley 
Frohne, Robert 
Gerard, Albert 
Grant, August 
Gray. William 
Gronlund, Oskar 
Gronros, Oswald 

-41* 
Gueno, PIte 
Gran, Axel 
Grag, William 
Hansen, Tborlelf 
Hansen, Jack 
Hansen, Max Owe 
Harley, Alex 
High, Edward 
Holmroos, Alln 
Hedrlck, Jack 
Jensen, L. 
Johansson, Arvo 
.Tohanssen. John F. 
Johnsen, Carl 



Johnson, Hans 
Johnson, Hllmar 
Kessa, Theo. 
Kord, HJalmar 
Kreander, Wlctor 
Kuldsen, John 
LIgoskt, Joe 
Lohtonen, Arthur 
Longren, Charley 
Malkoff, Peter 
Melners, Herman 
Meyers, George 
Nelson, Aug. 
Newman, I. 
Nielsen, Alf. W. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nilsen, Harry 
Olsen, Alt. 
Olsson, C. 
Pedersen, Alf. 
Peterson, Nels 
Pettersen, Carl 
Rahfl, J. 
Risenlus, Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Sandqulst. Gunnar 
Semlth, Ed. 
Schenk. Albert 
Shemwall, Sigurd 
Sckultz, Bernt. 
Thom, Alek. 
Thornland. John 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Waales, Edgar 
Wagner, Ed. 
Wedequlst, Axel 
Williams, T. C. 
Williams, John 
Wolf, R. G. 

Packagea. 
Elllngsen, Erllng 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Arthur Thane of Thane & Co., shipping firm 
has been appointed by the British Govern- 
ment to take charge of the shipment of com- 
modities from Pacific Coast ports for the British 
Government. He will also act as purchasing 
agent for the Britishers in buying lumber and 
other supplies. 

The bark "Emily F. Whitney" was libeled 
for $10,540 in the Federal District Court by Olaf 
Herman. Herman charges breach of contract 
providing for good treatment on a voyage to 
Alaska. He asserts he broke a finger and that 
the master of the Whitney failed to put back 
into port to have medical attention given him. 
He asks $540 for wages and $10,000 damages. 

G. M. McDowell, until a few months ago 
Portland manager for A. O. Anderson & Co., 
has been appointed receiver of the Olynipia 
Shipbuilding Company at Olynipia, Wash., where 
there are three wooden vessels under construc- 
tion, of 4000 tons each. The receivership was 
asked by the Gray's Harbor Shipbuilding Com- 
pany of Aberdeen, of which McDowell is also 
controller. At the Aberdeen yard are two 
wooden vessels of 4000 tons. 

Two Grays Harbor built ships, one an auxil- 
liary schooner and the other a steamer, will be 
launched this month. The auxilliary is being 
completed at the Grays Harbor Shipbuilding 
Company's yards here and the steamer is being 
built at the Mathews yards in Hoquiam. Both 
will go into the water the latter part of Octo- 
ber. Wlien the new auxiliary is launched at the 
Grays Harbor Shipbuilding Company's yards all 
three launching ways will be empty. 

The whaling bark "Alice Knowles," well 
known in this port, may have been lost in a 
hurricane in the Arctic last month, according 
to a dispatch from New Bedford; that wreck- 
age from the bark had been picked up by the 
schooner "William A. Graber," which arrived 
at New Bedford from the north. The master 
of the "Graber" said he spoke the "Alice 
Knowles" August 26, and on September 5 the 
bark ran into a hurricane. The bark was one 
of the fleet that sailed from this port in the 
old whaling days. In her last cruise in the 
Atlantic the bark sailed April 20, 1915. 

F. W. Berkshire, specially detailed by the Sec- 
retary of Labor on internment camps for enemy 
aliens, has arrived at San Francisco from El 
Paso, Texas, for a conference with Edward 
White, Commissioner of Immigration, as to the 
disposition of 175 German seafaring men held 
at Angel Island. It is said to be the plan of 
the Governmet to move the men either to Warm 
Springs, N. C., or one of the other large in- 
ternment camps. White and Berkshire will 
make a recommendation to the Secretary of 
Labor as to the best place for the men held at 
Angel Island. Of the 175 men here, 64 are 
ofificers of ships and the remainder members of 
crews of ships. 

Subscriptions to the stock of the Home Fire 
& Marine Insurance Co. closed at San Francisco 
with the issue considerably oversubscribed. The 
capital of the company is to be $500,000, with 
a surplus of $1,000,000, and the stock, with a 
par of $10 was offered to the holders of the 
Fireman's Fund shares at $30 per share, in the 
ratio of three shares of Home stock for one of 
Fireman's Fund. The Home Fire & Marine 
will write fire, marine and automobile insurance 
throughout the country, the original company 
having restricted its operations to fire insurance, 
in spite of "Marine" in its title. It will he 
operated in conjuncton with the Fireman's 
Fund and managed by its officers. 

The Seattle Port Commission has decided to 
submit a proposition to the voters at the next 
port election in December, which if approved 
by the electorate will place all of the ferries of 
the district, including those plying Lake Wash- 
ington, on a free basis. At present the five fer- 
ries operated by the port entail an annual defi- 
cit of $112,000, and the proposal to the elec- 
torate is that this together with the income re- 
ceipts be absorbed in the general port expense 
budget, it being maintained by the commission- 
ers that the earnings of the port facilities will 
readily meet the additional expense. At the spe- 
cial meeting the port commissions also issued 
the budget for 1918, which totals $200,000. 

"Chillicothe" and "Moshulu" are new names 
which have been given to the former German 
barks "Arnolus," "Vinnen" and "Kurt" respec- 
tively, which were interned in the Columbia 
River when the war broke out. Word to this 
cflfect has been received by Thomas C. Burke, 
Collector of Customs in the Oregon district 
from E. E. Chamberlain, United States Com- 
missioner of Navigation. At first the name of 
the " Kurt" was changed to "Dreadnought" and 
that of the "Arnoldus-Vinnen" to "Game Cock." 
In his advice to the local collector of customs 
Commissioner Chamberlain gave no reason as to 
why the names of the craft are being changed 
again. 

The town of Seward, Alaska, experienced the 
most destructive storm in its history on Tues- 
day, September 11. Heavy rains, accompanied 



by a strong wind, caused a flood in the residence 
district and along the line of the Alaska North- 
ern Railway which resulted in a loss estimated 
at $100,000. Lowell Creek, normally a small and 
quiet glacier stream which flows from the nearby 
hills into Resurrection Bay through the center 
of the town, became a torrent and overflowing 
its banks swept everything in its path. Blasting 
with dynamite was successfully resorted to in 
order to change the course of the stream from 
the main part of the town, otherwise the dam- 
age would have reached a much larger aggre- 
gate. 

President H. F. Alexander of the Pacific 
Steamship Company has been elected a member 
of the executive board of the American Steam- 
ship Association, according to a dispatch to 
headquarters of the company here. The execu- 
tive board of the Association is made up of the 
most prominent steamship men in the United 
States. The members of the board, in addition 
to Alexander, are: H. H. Raymond, president 
of the Mallory Line; P. A. S. Franklin, presi- 
dent of the International Mercantile Marine; 
J. Howland Gardner, president of the New Eng- 
land Steamship Company; Franklin D. Mooney, 
president of the New York and Porto Rico 
Line, and W. H. Pleasants, president of the 
Savannah Line. 

The steam-schooner "Quinault" vv'as wrecked 
on the Humboldt coast, about 30 miles south 
of Eureka on October 9. No lives were lost. 
The "Quinault" sailed from San Francisco Mon- 
day night, October 8, for Brookings Landing, 
Ore., with ten passengers and a cargo of gen- 
eral merchandise. Captain Peterson had com- 
mand of the vessel for the first time. Brookings 
Landing is near Bandon, Ore., and is tlie head- 
quarters of the C. & O. Lumber Company, 
owner of the wrecked vessel. The company 
purchased the "Quinault" from the Hart, Wood 
Lumber Company a year ago, and had been 
using the vessel in bringing lumber here. 
The "Quinault" has a carrying capacity of 625,- 
000 feet of lumber. The steamer was built at 
Aberdeen, Wash., in 1906. She is of 426 tons, 
169 feet in length, with a beam of 38 feet, and 
12 feet depth of hold. 

Charles R. Page, recently appointed a mem- 
I)cr of the Federal Shipping Board, left for 
Washington during the week, going by way of 
Seattle. He liad just returned from the south, 
where he visited all the shipyards and inter- 
viewed many shinping men in regard to condi- 
tions. While in Seattle, Page will make a study 
of shipbuilding activities on Puget Sound. It is 
expected he will make a report to the Shipping 
Board on arriving in Washington on the ship- 
ping situation on the Pacific Coast. The San 
Francisco office of the Shipping Board will be 
expanded materially on account of the number 
of ships belonging to the Government making 
this port their home port. Both steamships and 
sailing vessels of the Shipping Board are making 
long voyages to and from this port. Although 
new men will be selected for important posi- 
tions here, it is said none of the' present force 
will be disturbed. 

The steamships "Great Northern" and "North- 
ern Pacific," which were commandeered by the 
Government several weeks ago, have been placed 
officially in the Army transport service, ac- 
cording to a dispatch from Washington to Fed- 
eral officials. The officers of the ships will 
draw pay as civilian employes of the transport 
service. Tlic disposition of the big liners is no 
surprise, as it had been conjectured in ship- 
ping circles all along that either the Navy or 
the Shipping Board wolud operate the two 
steamships. The officers of the ships are mem- 
bers of the Naval Auxiliary Reserve, having 
been enrolled several months before the ves- 
sels were taken over from the Great Northern 
Pacific Steamship Company by the Government. 
The ships are being put into trim for offshore 
service at Bremerton on Puget Sound. Inas- 
much as the Army has control of the liners, 
there is some speculation as to whether the offi- 
cers who were on the vessels when they went 
north will be kept permanently. The officers 
are supposed to be still subject to call from 
the Navy on account of being members of the 
Naval Auxiliary Reserve. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone, Sut- 
ter 5807. (Advt.) 



"Silas B. Axtell (attorney for Seamen's Unions 
in New York), formerly attorney for The Legal 
Aid Society, announces that he has opened an 
office for the practice of law and for the ex- 
clusive use of seamen. Consultatirn and advice 
free of charge. Suits under the La Follette Act 
for half wages; actions for damages for injuries 
on account of accident, etc., given prompt atten- 
tion." (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 
FEDERATION 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

3i;s-332 West Randolpli St., CliicaK", 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY .7. PRYOR, Secretar.v 

iy2A Lewis Street 

Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 Soutli Broadway Street 

NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 
51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa AVALTER NIELSEN, Agent 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT, Va OSWALD RATHLEV, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala A. MOLLERSTADT, Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La JOHN BERG, Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex GEO. SCHRODER. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY 12 South Street 

Telephone 2107 Broad 
New York Branch 514 Greenwich Street 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Ma.'ss 6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La 228 Lafayette Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 806 South Broadway 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 20« Moravian Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters. 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Ave. 

Telephone John 396 

Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventli Ave. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 231 Dock Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS. Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 220 Twentieth Street 

BOSTON, Mass 16S Commercial Street 

NORFOLK, Va 54 Commercial Place 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE. R. 1 27 Wiekenden Streeet 



NEW ENGLAND COAST FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GIjOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 324-332 West Randolpli Street 

Teleplione Franklin 278 
Branches and Agencies: 

BUFFALO. N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneea 936 R. 

ri,10\'I';LAND. 1401 AV. Ninth Street 

'I'elephono Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, O " Bridge Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

IHOTKOIT, Mich 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAtn- SCn.VRRENBERCl Editor 

1. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by m:ill - $2.00 | Six months - - - Jl.OO 
Adverti.sing Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' ITnlon of the Paclflc, 
R9 Clay Street. San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Comnuinications from seafarlne reailers will be 
published in the .lOI'RNVl.. prnviiled they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legitile. written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .TOt'RXAT, is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDXESD.W, OCTOP.ER 17, 1917. 



UXCLE S.\:\[ GETTING RE.\DY. 



On Monday of this week tlie U. S. Gov- 
ernment requisitioned all .\mcrican passen- 
i^^er steamships of 2500 gross tons and all 
cargo ships able to carry not less than 2500 
tons dead weight, including bunkers, water 
and stores. There has been considerable 
speculation as to the effect which tiiis trans- 
fer is likely to have upon the personnel of 
these vessels. Many rumors -aw in tlu- air 
but nothing definite. 

It is certain, of course, that most of the 
vessels requisitioned on the Pacific will sooner 
or later be transferred to the .\tlantic. .\i- 
cording to current newspaper reports, how- 
ever, Pacific Coast shipowners have received 
assurances from the Federal Shipping Board 
that no vessels would be taken by the Gov- 
ernment for Army uses before next spring. 
Moreover, it is said that for the present no 
ships on the Pacific will be diverted from 
their regular routes. According to the re- 
port from \\'ashington all vessels needed by 
the Army will be taken on the Atlantic or 
the Gulf. Notwithstanding these belated re- 
ports, the Pacific Mail Steamship Com[)any, 
the Oceanic Steamship Company, the Mat- 
son Navigation Company and other large 
com])anies expected to relinquish some of 
their steam.ships in the next week or two 
and had prepared to rearrange their sched- 
ules in conformity to changed conditions. 

In the meantime. Congress has admitted 
foreign vessels to the coastwise trade of 
the United States under certain stipulations 
hut with. the proviso that the trade to .Maska 
and between Alaskan ports .shall continue to 
be reserved for vessels of American registry. 
The suspension of the coastwise trade law is 
for the period of the war and 120 days there- 
after. 

With all these unprecedented changes in 
shipping laws and usages the .-\merican mer- 
chant marine is growing as never before. 

On November 1, according to official esti- 



mates, there will be available a total of 503 
ships, with an aggregate deadweight capacity 
of 3,730.844 tons, suitable for the transat- 
lantic service. This means that shii)ping 
under the American flag registered for the 
forei.gn trade will have increased from 2,- 
424,000 tons — that being the amount regis- 
tered for the foreign trade June 30. 1917 — 
to 3,730,844 tons. At this rate of increase 
(and we have just commenced on the big 
program) there .seems little encouragement 
for the enemy's claim that he will win liy 
continuing his ruthless submarine warfare. 



'•pr.Xl SUING DESERTERS." 



.Albert Braniioii, a ship's fireman and trimmer, 
was charged at Manchester. I'-ngland, recently 
with leaving the steamship "Bovic," on wliich 
he had contracted to serve for tlie return voy- 
age, at New York. Defendant was engaged 
July 2 to serve on the s. s. "Bovic," liis wages 
heing £9 a month. He drew some of his 
wages in advance during the voyage, and while 
the steamer was lying at New York lie absented 
himself and signed on in a similar capacity on the 
?. s. "Byron," at the .American rate of £18 Is. 
a month. In these circumstances the prosecu- 
tors had to obtain the services of a substitute 
at £15 a month. Defendant had rendered him- 
self liable to the forfeiture of his effects and of 
the wages he had earned, both on the "Bovic" 
and the "Byron," and to indemnify the prosecu- 
tors against any excess payment of wages they 
liad incurred in consequence of having had to 
engage a substitute. In that case defendant had 
made his arrangements with such circumspection 
that only 19s. 4d. of his wages on the "Bovic" 
remained unpaid. His wages on the "Byron," 
amounting to £11 14s. lid., however, had riot 
been paid. The excess expenditure to which 
the prosecutors had been put through having 
to obtain a substitute amounted to £4 12s. The 
Court ordered that defendant should forfeit the 
unpaid amount of his wages and pay the com- 
plainant company the excess wages they had 
paid his substitute. He also allowed two 
guineas costs. Counsel for prosecutors said the 
shipowners regarded such ofTenses as very seri- 
ous. The difficulty in replacing men abroad was 
becoming almost insuperable, and the tempta- 
tion to men to desert and resign was very 
great. The thing had grown to be a scandal. 
The complainant company alone had lost over 
4(K) men since the beginning of May. Xo fewer 
than .10 men had deserted from another steamer 
at Xew ^■ork. 

The foregoing item from a Xi-\v \ ork 
weekly is a tyjiical selection from a num- 
ber of similar news items making the 
rounds of the journals devoted to com- 
merce and shi])|)ing. In a few instances 
just reported the ])enalty was even more 
severe, actual jail sentences having been 
imposed u])on the deserters on their ar- 
rival home. 

It will be recalled that the i>roi)onents 
of the Seamen's .'\ct were cjuitc confident 
in ])redicting a slow but sure process of 
wage e(|ualizing between .\merican and 
foreign shi])s touching at our i)orts. 

Before the Seamen's .\ct of 1915 took 
effect foreign shii)s in our i)orts were in 
the happy i)osition of having at their di< 
l)osal "free of charge" the entire police 
force of I'ncle Sam to ])revent their low 
wage crews from quitting or "desertin.g" 
and accepting employment on another shi]) 
at the going wages of the i)ort. 

Since the law has taken effect foreign 
ships in American ])orts have been in pre- 
ciselv the same jiosition as .American shijis. 
In order to kee]) their crews they must 
jtav somewhere near the jirevailing wages 
of the port at which tlu-y load or dis- 
charge cargo. .\ refusal to do so will 
promptly set in motion the very law of 
economics which ])rom])ts every normal 
human being to better his conditions when 
a fair opportunity presents itself. In other 
words, the freedom clause in the Seamen's 
law operates quietly but effectively against 
the vessels with the low wage crews. 

Of course, for reasons arising with out 



country's entry into the war it is to he 
deplored that any of our allies' merchant 
vessels should be delayed in our ports one 
single moment. But surely, even during 
war times, there can be no good reason 
why British shi])ping interests should ex- 
])ect any special privile,gcs or any undue 
advantages over any other nation's ships 
and especially over our own ships. If 
British shii)s trading to American ports 
will pay the same wages as are paid by 
.\mcrican shii)s in the same trade they will 
secure an ecjual dispatch. What more can 
they rea.sonably expect? 

The attempts of the British Go\ eminent 
to stop, or at least discourage, desertions 
Ijy meting out i>tinishment to the deserters, 
u])on their return home, are bound to re- 
suit in failure. Other countries have at- 
tempted to cure this alleged evil by similar 
and even more drastic methods. But in- 
stead of discouraging desertions abroad it 
has had an entirely different and certainly 
most undesirable consequence. The deserters 
have simply avoided their native land. They 
have continued sailing in other countries" 
.ships and to other countries' ports. Thus 
their home ties would become weaker and, in 
the cour.se of years, of negligible quantity. 
To put it in more concise langua.gc, ever}' 
country which has sought to punish its own 
citizens or subjects, for trying to better 
their economic conditions, has ultimately lost 
most of them entirely. 

England can ill afford to lose her native 
merchant seamen. So it is more than likely 
that upon second sober thought the policy 
of trj'ing to keep down wa.ges by severe 
punishment of the deserters will be speedily 
abandoned. 



LIBERTY LOAN FACTS. 



Savings accounts in the belligerent coun- 
tries of Europe have increased in greater 
proportion than ever since the outbreak 
of the war. What does that mean? 

There is but one answer — the people are 
saving from their current incomes. Their 
current incomes are greater than ever be- 
fore because of the huge purchases neces- 
sitated by the war, because of the Govern- 
ment activity in all lines of industry, and 
because of the war loans which have been 
issued. 

In asking you to buy a Liberty Bond, 
the United States Government does not 
ask vou to si)end your money. It offers 
vou a splendid opportunity to save an<l 
to invest. 

The effect of the successful subscription 
of this second lyiberty Loan fas of the 
first) and the huge purchases necessitated 
bv our Government, and by our Allies in 
this country, have and will create a situa- 
tion where every man and every -woman 
who is capable of working may have more 
work than ever before in their lives, and 
at good pay. 

The great selling campai.gn now being 
carried on to dispose of Liberty Bonds of 
the second Liberty Loan of 1917 will stim- 
ulate more thrift and more saving by the 
.\merican people. The result will be that 
vou, who now buy Liberty Bonds from 
your current savings, will find you are 
acquiring the saving habit, and you need 
have no fear that your income will be 
curtailed during this period. 

WHiy not begin to save to-day and bu.\ 
a Libertv Bond? 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



BETTER FORECASTLES. 



The first British "standard" ship, built on 
Government account, is now in commission, 
and it may be remembered that some time 
ago it was reported that the accommodation 
for the crews of the standard ships would 
be superior to that provided on other cargo- 
carrying' steamers. The crew, it was ex- 
plained, would be berthed in the poop in- 
stead of the forecastle, separate "rooms" 
would be provided, each room having two 
berths, the messing arrangements would be 
entirely distinct from the sleeping accommo- 
dation, there would be a smoking-room for 
general use, special arrangements would be 
made for heating the quarters by steam, and 
the floor and cubic spaces would be con- 
siderably in excess of the statutory require- 
ments. Now it is reported by those who 
visited the ship that the quarters are not 
quite in keeping with the promises officially 
made. Although the accommodation for the 
crew marks a decided improvement on that 
generally provided, it is evident that there 
has been too much haste in construction, and 
the quarters, generally speaking, lack com- 
pleteness. The separate rooms provided are 
well ventilated, but there is not sufficient 
provision for storing the men's belongings. 
The washing facilities are also unsatisfactory. 
These consist of one small cramped room, 
containing two wash hand-basins, one for 16 
firemen, and the other for eight sailors. Only 
.salt water is laid on, and fresh water has to 
be carried amidships. 

It is fortunate, indeed, that our own Amer- 
ican fleet of "standard" ships now building 
will have to rigidly comply with the require- 
ments of the Seamen's Act, which compels a 
substantial improvement over the very in- 
ferior and deplorable crew accommodations 
on most United States merchant vessels now 
in service. 



THE COMPENSATION LAWS. 



I 



By affixing his signature to a bill intro- 
duced by Senator Hiram VV. Johnson of 
California, President Wilson on October 6 
restored to seamen, longshoremen and other 
workers about ships the rights and remedies 
given by the workmen's compensation laws 
of the various States. L^nfortunately, the 
law could not be made retroactive, hence it 
will be of no advantage to the victims of 
industrial accidents happening prior to Oc- 
tober 6. 

It will be recalled that the United States 
Supreme Court by a recent (5 against 4) de- 
cision deprived these workers of the benefits 
of workmen's compensation and referred 
their injury cases to maritime liability juris- 
diction. This ruling caused immediate and 
untold sufifering. Casualty insurance com- 
panies at once repudiated their obligations 
to injured workers of that class and to the 
dependents of these workers where the ac- 
cident had resulted in death. 

Of course, even with the old conditions 
restored, seamen arc still in an anomolous 
position so far as protection against acci- 
dent is concerned. Certain State Compensa- 
tion laws offer some protection to seamen, 
others very little, and still others none at all. 
Obviously, there is only one way of securing 
a semblance of justice to all concerned. Con- 
gress should follow the lead of other mari- 
time nations and enact a just and compre- 
hensive Federal Compensation law for all 
American seamen. 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 

Stenographic Report of the Recent Washington 

Conference Between Shipowners and 

Seamen (Fifth Serial.) 



Statement of Mr. Gustav H. Brown (Cont'd.). 

Now the question here is to get tiie Amer- 
ican boy to sea, and God knows we are willing 
to try to get him to sea, as far as we seamen 
are concerned. Wc have agreed, in a tentative 
agreement, that we will try to get them and 
encourage them to come with us, and to train 
them when we get them there, but I will ask 
you gentlemen, Mr. Chairman and Mr. Secre- 
tary, in all honesty if you believe that the 
American lioy is going to go into the same fore- 
castle with the kind of men that I have men- 
tioned here, sailing in coastwise liners, and 
sailing, in some instances, across the western 
ocean? The American boy is not going to go 
in with any people that he cannot speak to, 
and that he cannot talk to and that he cannot 
understand, and that he cannot associate with. 
That is human nature. You cannot blame the 
American boy for not doing it. If you are go- 
ing to train merchant seamen, and if you are 
going to get the American boy to sea, if you 
really want him to go to sea, and if this coun- 
try really wants to be a sea power it must have 
men of its own kind and its own race to man 
their own vessels. .So. eventually to get cnougii 
officers, both on the deck, in the fire-room and 
in the engine-room, you must change the con- 
dition in this way that when the young Amer- 
ican boy goes to sea, and when we do get him 
there, he will stay there and that he will be 
traveling with men and working alongside of 
men whom he can associate with. 

TJic language test of the Seamen's Act has not 
been enforced. If it had l)ecn enforced as it 
should have been from the time that the act 
became a law, I venture to say that to-day you 
would not be talking about the American boy 
and trying to encourage him to come to the 
sea. He would be there already, because I tell 
you, gentlemen, that last fall we had about two 
dozen — not two dozen but about two thousand — 
young American boys coming down around the 
port of New York alone looking for a chance 
to go to sea. .Some of them had had some 
experience before, having gone across as deck- 
hands and in various capacities, but because of 
the system that has prevailed in New York 
in carrying these races, these men that T have 
just mentioned, it has been impossible to get 
the American boy in the vessels, and naturally 
when he came and found that he could not get 
into the vessels he went somewhere else. 

I have been in very close touch with the sit- 
uation in New York for the last three or four 
years, or ever since war was declared on the 
other side, and I think I know a little of \\liat 
I am talking about. This is the thing that has 
appealed to me most, the very fact that the 
language test has not been enforced and that 
the forecastles have not been changed in the 
way they should have been changed, has some- 
tliing to do with it because if you want to get 
an American boy to sea, if you want him to go 
there, not alone must you see to it that you 
get the people that he can associate with prop- 
erly, that he can talk to and chum in with, but 
you nuist also see to it that the living condi- 
tions aboardship are such that when he once 
gets there he will stay there. 

Now that is the way it has appealed to me. 
T am not trying to kid myself or fool you gen- 
tlemen but I believe you will have a surplus 
of men here, and since I heard the statement 
of the Commissioner of Navigation yesterday 
that this year there will be more tonnage put 
out of the yards than was ever known before 
in the history of the world, practically, that 
there is likely to be a scarcity although we have 
got the surplus now. Rut we may avoid that. 
We can avoid a scarcity of seamen by enforcing 
the Seamen's law in the way that it ought to 
be enforced, to give the American boy a chance 
to come in, and just as soon as he comes in 
the people will be willing to teach him and try 
to make a seaman out of him. Of course I do 
not think there are any gentlemen present who 
think that a seaman can be made in two or three 
days or a week. In fact, all he does when he 
goes to sea is merely to scrub the paint and 
scrub the deck; he is not a seaman anyway. 

Now if this war has proven anything, it has 
proven that you need seamen. That is what it 
has proven. You want men in case of accident 
or in case of trouble who will keep cool and 
calm; men who can lower a boat in any kind 
of weather, and who after tlie boat is lowered 
can go into the water with its human freight, 
and who will know how to take care of that 
boat. That is seamanship. The matter of keep- 
ing the vessel clean is merely an incident to 
the man's work aboardship. But this war has 
proven that we need this kind of men, and 
whenever we find any difficulty in getting the 
men, this is what we usually have to cxi)lain to 
the men — this is what we are asked, bluntly: 
''What vessel is this? How speedy is she? Is 
she armed? What kind of men does slie carry? 
What kind of boats has she got?" If we can 
tell our people what we know about that ves- 
sel — say, "Well, this vessel is making from 12 to 
14 knots, or we make 16 knots, you have got a 

(Continued on Page 8.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 15, 1917. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Frank Johnson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair, the number of members 
around the hall increasing. Shipwreck Benefit 
was ordered paid to four members of the ship 
"St. Francis." The five hundred dollar dona- 
tion to the striking street carmen of San Fran- 
cisco was declared carried. Nomination for offi- 
cers for the ensuing term was proceeded with. 
The delegates to the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor convention submitted their re- 
port and is published in full in this week's 
issue. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Hall Bldg., 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



St. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 8, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

WILI_.IAM HASTINGS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 8, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping good. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

Tacoma Agency, Oct. 8, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; prospects uncer- 
tain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 8, 1917. 
Shipping medium. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 8, 1917. 
Shipping slack; prospects good. 

E. J. D. LORENTZEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 8, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 
JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88'/2 Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 8, 1917. 
Shipping good; members scarce. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 159. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 8, 1917. 
Shijiping medium; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128'/^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 67. 
Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 1, 1917. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, .San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 11, 1917. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping fair; plenty of members 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 4, 1917. 
.Shipping fair; short of members in all branches 
in the stewards' department. Nominated officers 
for the ensuing term and delegates to the Inter- 
national Seamen's Union Convention. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 8, 1917. 
No meetin.g. Shipping medium; no members 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
98 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



DIED. 

Kinit llerlitz. No. 2549. a native of Sweden, 
age 26, died at Seattle, Wasli., Oct. 3. 1917. 

(ieorge Nortin, No. 1186, a native of Sweden, 
age 27, died at Seattle, Wash. (Seattle, minutes 
10-8-17). 

Oscar Petterson, No. 857, a native of Sweden, 
age 34, killed in Alaska, July 25, 1917. 



The Yukon River is about 200 miles longer 
than the Mississippi, but it is 2000 miles shorter 
than the Missouri-Mississippi, measured from 
the Rocky Mountains in Montana and from 
Itasca Lake in Minnesota. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



pretty good crowd of people there and she has 
got good boats, as far as we know, and she is 
armed" — we have found that there was no trouble 
to get the men to go in. But they will not 
sail with people who cannot understand them 
in case of emergency, and they will not sail 
with people that they cannot understand. 

Mr. Chairman and Mr. Secretarj', and gentle- 
men, I am not going to impose upon you by 
saying anything further. I will simply close by 
stating that in my opinion, and in the opinion 
of our men, we believe the most vital thmg is 
to have the Seamen's Act enforced in such way 
that wc can get the American boy to go to sea. 
I thank you gentlemen. 

Mr. Oscar Carlson (representing the Marine 
Firemen and Watertenders' Organization of 
New York City): Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: 
I have the honor to represent the Marine Fire- 
men and Watertenders' Association of New- 
York, and I will state that at the present time 
there is no shortage of men. It is true that 
in the last three or four months that some ves- 
sels have been held up for a time, but not due 
to a scarcity of men, but through an organiza- 
tion, a foreign organization, we will call it. 
consisting of Spanish firemen, calling them- 
selves I. \V. \V. or Industrial Workers of the 
World. We have in the last four months had 
a great deal of trouble w-ith these people. The 
shipowners in some instances have called on us 
to replace them, and 1 will state for you now 
in tlie last three months we have, out of the 
port of New York, replaced the I. W. W. with 
men when we have gone out and asked for $10, 
$15 and $20 more wages, and in very few cases 
the vessels have been delayed not more than 
si.\ up to twelve hours. 

The greatest trouble is the conditions which 
prevail in some of the ships — that is, the fore- 
castle. Last week I was called up by one of 
the steamship owners out of New York. One 
of the vessels was delayed with four hundred 
or five hundred passengers on board, and, Mr. 
Chairman and Mr. Secretary, I went down to 
find out what was the reason. The men told 
me that there was no complaint about the 
work; that so far as food and things of that 
kind was concerned, it was all right, but it 
was impossible for them to sleep in the places 
they had provided for them in the vessels. 
Gentlemen, there were sixteen men sleeping in 
a hold, and I do believe that if the ship own- 
ers looked into this hold themselves, they 
would not put a dog in there. We managed 
to get the ship owners of this company to 
promise to look into it, and the superintendent 
of the line, he says himself, "I cannot blame 
these men, Mr. Carlson." 

There is another thing, gentlemen. It is 
very hard to get the young American to go 
into the stokc-hold as a coal passer. In the 
last eight or ten weeks, we had a great number 
of young, husky boys applying for jobs to go 
to sea as coal passers, and we have in every 
instance given them a card to go down to 
apply to the engineer for a job. The engi- 
neers have given them jobs, and they have 
gone to the forecastle, and they find out that 
99 out of every hundred in the forecastle are 
not able to speak a v/ord of the English lan- 
guage, and they will come back and say, "We 
are not willing to go and sail with these men," 
and I believe, gentlemen, if the language test 
r.ndcr the law is properly enforced, it would 
be an easy matter to get an American boy to 
go to sea. 

I have in some instances been down to the 
American Line, and I have seen as many as 
."iOO young, husky American boys applying for 
positions in any capacity other than this, or 
in any other way he could go to sea, but as 
I understand there is no provision for the 
-American boy and we have tried in the engine 
department, and it is very hard to get them 
to work along with the Spaniards. 

I thank you, gentlemen. That is all I have 
to say. (Applause.) 

Secretary Redfield: Any further presentation? 

Address by Mr. H. P. Griffin. 

Mr. H. P. (Irififin: I want to follow up what 
Comrade Furuseth said about Germans, first. 
Wc have at the present moment 424 Germans. 
These Germans are practical, skilled seamen, 
bakers, butchers and cooks. There is about 50 
per cent, more of them in the organization, but 
since some orders have been issued regarding 
them they have been driven out of the ships, 
and I believe out of that 424, probably by the 
time we get back, another half of them will 
be gone, and I join with Mr. Furuseth in 
asking that something be done about that 
matter. Those 424 men that were there when 
I left New York would practically man a 
couple of hundred ships at any rate, and they 
are practical men that cannot be replaced. 

Of boys we can get plenty. We can get 
them for a trip. They will make one trip, and 
then they are finished. That is on account of 
tlie sleeping quarters mostly. The sleeping 
quarters on board of the ships are not what 
with the co-operation of the ship owners, that 
they ought to be. and I believe myself that, 
can be rectified. I want to say that, if the 
shipowners want to show their patriotism, T do 
nat know of any better way in the world than 



to get right on the job and show their pa- 
triotism right now and go after these sleeping 
(juarters for all of the men, firemen, sailors 
unci tlie stewards' department. 

We can imagine the warmest day we have 
had in here, right here without any fans, and 
you have got some considerable amount of ven- 
tilation in hire, but where these men sleep 
they have not got but very little ventilation, and 
the climate very often where they are is 
hotter than it is here, especially when a ship 
is lying up beside a dock. They want some 
ventilation and some fans. It would cost a 
few cents, and it is a good way to show pa- 
triotism and spend a few dollars. 

The British Government, after the first year 
of the war — even before the first year of the 
war — found by experience that it was a profita- 
ble investment for them to give up dealing with 
middlemen and to get right down to cases and 
deal directly witli the organized bodies of sea- 
men and tradesmen of all kinds in Great Brit- 
ain, and to-day in Great Britain we find the 
Government recognizing to the fullest extent 
the organizations of labor. There is no short- 
age of engineers. There is no shortage of deck 
oflficers or captains. There is no shortage of 
sailors or firemen, as we have been told here, 
hut I want to tell you gentlemen there is a 
big shortage of cooks, bakers and butchers, and 
I do not know to-day where we are going to 
get them, and that is a serious problem there, 
and it has got to be solved, by the United 
States Government or by somebody, where we 
are going to get cooks, bakers and butchers to 
man these ships. To the man who has not had 
the experience this may seem a slight matter, 
but I want to give you a practical experience 
in that matter. T have seen ships left in New 
York harbor with a full crew on board, from 
the captain down, with the exception of one 
man, a baker, and that ship lay there for forty- 
right hours, and gave our organization carte 
blanche to spend any amount of money, but to 
go and get the bakers, and we have hired taxi- 
cabs and tugboats and everything else and 
spent a lot of time and had even our officials 
out hunting for a baker. We have gone into a 
man's room, where he has been dead drunk, and 
helped to dress him and put him in a cab and 
carried him on board the ship and put him in 
his bunk drunk, so that they would have the 
services of that man the next day. If that is 
not of considerable importance, I do not know 
why they should do that. I have seen mutiny 
on board a ship because of the lack of a baker 
or a good cook. In 1907 we had trouble of that 
sort. They put in incompetent cooks and bakers, 
and in consequence there was mutiny on board 
the ship, and shooting and rioting, and the 
captain said they would never go to sea again 
with such cooks. 

That is why I would like to see if there is 
any possible way of keeping those Germans who 
have been sailing fifteen or twenty years in 
these ships, and I will say in addition, during 
the three years or more that tliis war has been 
on, there has not been but one single case that 
I know of — and I guess I hear about every- 
thing — there has been only one case where there 
has been any trouble with a German, and he 
was supposed to be a bit of a nut. and when 
they got wireless messages that the Germans 
had done something, he would get nutty, and a 
countryman of mine, an Irishman, had got his 
goat, and he pulled out a razor and they had 
a little slashing match, and that cured that 
German, and they ha\e liad no trouble since. 

W^hen we go out looking for men we have 
advertised in the newspapers. We have spent 
our organization's money to advertise in the 
papers to get more men. T hope we will be able 
to advertise when we do it again, which is a 
real fact anyhow, and I do not see why we 
cannot advertise it. that the men we are asking 
to go to sea will be exempt, of course, from 
military duty in the trenches. In England to- 
day they have got that system. It is down to 
a fine point there. It is either go into the 
trenches or go on hoard the ships. At any 
rate I hope that this Government will profit by 
the experience of our Allies, and instead of 
going anywhere and everywhere, as h.is been 
done in the past — it has been done by the 
Shipping Board; it has been done by the War 
Department; it has been done by anybody and 
everybody connected with the getting of the 
men, that they go anywhere and everywhere to 
get men, and when they cannot get them any- 
where else they come at the eleventh hour to 
an organization of labor. I hope now that 
they will come to us. Naturally, most naturally, 
we have been in business fifteen or more years, 
and we are known all over the whole world, 
and whenever men in any line of business come 
to this country, the first place they naturally 
will drift to will be to our headquarters or to 
one of our branches in any port that they hap- 
pen to be in. F.either that or into a sailors' 
boarding house. 

I thank you. (.\pplausc.') 

Mr. Daniel Ingraham (Norfolk. Virginia): Mr. 
Chairman, the situation in Norfolk is practic- 
ally the same as it is in the other northern 
ports. I do not think there is much use of 
me taking up your time in going over the 
matter again. T thank you. 

Statement of Mr. Herman York. 

Mr. Herman York (Agent for the Marine 
Firemen's Organization, New Orleans, La.): Mr. 



Chairman and Mr. Secretary, I cannot make 
any definite statement as to the amount of men 
available at the present time in New Orleans, 
for the reason that conditions aboard ship have 
made it a big factor in men leaving the port of 
New Orleans and going inland to work on 
shore at various industries. Firemen and oilers 
have left New Orleans and gone to the Lakes, 
where better conditions have existed with re- 
gard to seamanship, and furthermore, for the 
reason and argument that I find coming up time 
and again, of conditions aboard ship. I want 
to state here that I am not in this labor move- 
ment just because I want to help build up a 
labor movement. I am in this movement just 
the same as a social worker would be in a 
social service work, just as anybody would go 
into the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Animals, to prevent that cruelty. 

The seaman has been considered the scum of 
society for hundreds of years back. Why cannot 
his status be lifted, his conditions improved? 
I have heard the argument time and time again 
that seamen would say, "We are not going out 
on that boat again." You must consider the 
standard of living of the boy. He is brought 
up in a fairly good condition in .America, in his 
home. He has got a fairly good bed to sleep 
in at his home with his folks. He has fairly 
good food to live on. When he gets aboard ship, 
those things are all upside down. They are 
not half as good as he has been accustomed to. 
A fireman goes out of a hot fircroom. The 
temperature down on the Gulf of Mexico at 
the present time averages from 110 to 145 to 
160 temperature in the fireroom and boiler- 
rooms. He goes up in the forecastle and finds 
it from 110 to 115 in the forecastle. He goes 
up to the forecastle and changes clothes and 
washes down, if there is provision made for 
that, and lies in his bunk for eight hours, per- 
spirin.g in his bunk. How is that man fit for 
work when he goes back to watch again? Do 
you think that man is going to stay on that 
job? No. The man will last one trip and go 
off. The idea of it is not to have a man stay 
on just for one trip. If he is an American, 
we want him to stay on that ship three or four 
or five months. That is the time to show, and 
for the men that employ these seamen to show, 
that conditions are proper for the seamen on 
ship, and the conditions prove it. when a man 
not only stays on for one but for fifty trips. 
That shows that that man is satisfied with the 
conditions existing on those ships. 

There are a large number of young Americans 
comin.c down to me at the Port of New Or- 
leans from various parts of the United States, 
from the Middle W'est, men who have not had 
any experience so far as the fire and engine 
room work is concerned, but at the present 
time I have found it impossible to put these 
men aboard ships, for the reason that we have 
a large number of experienced men in the port 
of New Orleans that are capable of taking po- 
sitions now existing, and I have sent down 
some experienced men to ships, and I disregard 
the question of whether a man has got a union 
book or not. I do not consider that question 
at all, but the idea is to put the man in a 
job, and if he wants to join the union after- 
wards that is all right. The idea is to get the 
man on the job that he is qualified for and the 
job that he can do the work on. So I have 
to turn down all of these young Americans 
coming down to New Orleans, for the reason 
that I could not find it possible to put them 
aboard ships where they could be taught. I 
do not know whether those men would have 
been accepted by the engineers. I could not 
understand that they would take a green man 
and bear the patience of breaking that man in. 

The conditions of seamanship with regard to 
the wages in the Seamen's Act has been satis- 
factory, notwithstanding that the law is on the 
book that there is 25 cases where I had to 
libel ships on account of getting w^ages for 
seamen in the port of New Orleans, fighting 
for the ri.ght of the seamen. Why should those 
things exist? If the American had a fair and 
square chance, gentlemen, he would be back to 
sea to-morrow. I thank you. (Applause.) 

Mr. George Schroedcr (Port Arthur, Texas): 
Mr. Chairman and Mr. Secretary, there is no 
scarcity of men at the present time in Port 
Arthur. As a matter of fact, they are piling 
up, and there is no question of the men not 
being willing to go on any ship or in the war 
zone at the present time, nor will there be any 
trouble in getting the American boys, any 
amount of them, but the conditions must be 
fit on the ship for them to live in, so that he 
can live there. He is not afraid of guns, but 
he is afraid to die slowly by inches of ill health, 
and he is afraid of slavery. He wants to be 
treated as a man and not as a dog. 

I believe that is all I have to say. (Applause.) 
Address by Mr. E. A. Erickson. 

Mr. F. A. Erickson (representing Sailors' Un- 
ion of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.): Mr. 
Chairman and Mr. Secretary, I think that every- 
thing has been said regarding the seamen's 
question and I will not take up a great deal of 
time about it. I just want to add a few words 
to what has been slid regarding conditions that 
prevail on the Pacific Coast and especially San 
Francisco. . 

There is a shortage of men on the Pacific 
Coast to-day unquestionably, and in San Fran- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



cisco in particular, and very much more of a 
shortage on account of a number of fishermen 
going to Alaska during the season. I think, 
however, we will have enough for the so-called 
local consumption, and for the necessity of the 
Coast. I do not believe, gentlemen, that it is 
going to be any great trouble in obtaining suf- 
ficient men for the vessels. Questions of that 
kind, during my many years of experience in 
San Francisco, generally have solved themselves. 

We found out in 1906, prior to the earthquake, 
or at the time of the earthquake, rather, we had 
4500 men in the Sailors' Union, and our mem- 
bership increased within a year to about 6000 — • 
1500 members in one j'ear, or a little over a year. 
That shows there was more demand for the 
men, and the men drifted back to the sea. The 
result will be the same unquestionably when the 
Government gets its ships ready to be manned. 

There is something to be rectified and should 
be rectified by both the Government and by 
the employer. One of the things to be recti- 
fied is stricter enforcement of the Seamen's Act, 
especially in regard to quarters for the men. 
The other matter which should be rectified 
especially now by the new Shipping Board in 
the construction of vessels is the forecastle. 
There are forecastles on the Pacific Coast to- 
day that you would not be willing to keep a 
pig in, if you had to eat the pork. 

There was a statement made by Captain 
Gibson of Seattle in regard to a government 
sliip at San Francisco delayed for several days. 
I want to repudiate that statement. I do not 
know that Captain Gibson is here now, but it 
does not make any difference. It will go down 
in the record. The vessel was not delayed an 
hour on accoimt of the crew. I filled the ves- 
sel myself. The only time she was delayed 
was on account of the captain getting sick. 
So far as the crew was concerned, there was 
no delay. 

'i'his vessel was manned with but two able 
seamen, sixteen boys and two boatswains, and 
mates, etc. If you can get ten or twelve 
or fourteen or sixteen boys for each ship, 
1 think the manning question will solve itself 
very easily. I do not think there will be 
any holler about the shortage of men if that 
can be accomplished. With the co-operation 
of the shipowners and the shipping board, there 
certainly ought to be some way to change the 
forecastles, and make them inhabitable, not only 
for the men now but for the men who contem- 
plate going to sea. There will be more en- 
couragement in that than anything that can be 
thought of, because if there is anything that 
Americans want, or anybody else for that mat- 
ter, is to have a little comfort in the place he 
sleeps, eats and works, and I think that is one 
of the remedies that should be applied. 

I do not know that there is anything further 
I want to say. There are quite a number of 
others that ha\-e their little talk to make, I 
suppose, so I thank you very much, (.'\pplause.) 

Statement of Mr. Patrick Flynn. 

Mr. Patrick Flynn (San Francisco, Cal.): Mr. 
Chairman and Mr. Secretary and gentlemen of 
the conference, the great question that seems 
to be before us here is the providing for the 
American boy to go to sea and to entice 
those of us that were driven from the sea to 
come back. I am glad to have this oppor- 
tunity to come before you, because we have 
been preaching this kind of gospel for many 
years past, and if the shipov^'ners will only prac- 
tice somewhat the way they preach and get 
right down on the ground and co-operate with 
the organized seamen of this country, I am sat- 
isfied in my mind that we will havf little cause 
to worry on that particular point. 

The particular vocation that I follow, namely, 
that of the fireroom, particularly where we 
burn coal fuel, is no child's play. You can just 
take it for yourself, sitting around here without 
any exertion, the way that yon perspire, the way 
that you feel fatigue and everything else, the 
first thing you look for is somewhere to get 
rid of that stuff and to find a cool corner. The 
conditions on board of the ships up to the 
present time at least, have no provision to give 
men relief in that way, men coming out of the 
fireroom have to find some place to wash them- 
selves, no protection from the heat or the cold, 
his sweaty clothes, as a general rule, he has 
got to throw where he sleeps and eats, and 
those are the conditions that are obnoxious' 
particularly to the American boy. In our par- 
ticular calling we have a different method of 
breaking the young fellow in from that of the 
deck. For this reason, that if he joins the 
ship as a coal-passer, we, the experienced men 
as firemen, teach him what to do, so that he 
can step in and take our places afterwards. 
If he is wiping on a ship that is burning fuel 
oil, he gets the knowledge of oiling the engine 
and gets the knowledge of burning the oil to 
become a fireman and afterwards a water-tender. 

When I was sailing, and it is not so very 
long ago, I was considered a small man among 
the men that followed our particular calling. 
The country is full of such men, and they can 
be brought back to the sea, provided that we, 
as representatives, are in a position to go before 
those men and give them some assurance, at 
least, that the Seaman's bill as it now stands 
will not be trifled with; that there will be assur- 
ance given to them of the proper conditions 



aboard of a sliip, whereby they will be com- 
fortable and taken care of. 

I do not know anything about the new con- 
struction, as to what the fuel will be, but if 
it is oil, the country is full of young men 
ranging from eighteen to twenty years of age 
that will make excellent men for that kind of 
work, under the tutorship of those who are 
left to give them that kind of training. 

I have had experience on both the deck and 
in the fireroom and engine-room, and the only 
thing that keeps the boy to-day from coming 
back, or prior, rather, to the passage of the 
Seaman's Act, was on account of the living 
conditions and the way that they were fed, and 
so forth, aboard of the ships. 

In so far as junior officers are concerned, we 
are turning them out every day, and there is 
enough timber left yet among the organized 
seamen to still keep turning them out, provided 
that we are in a position, as I say, to go out 
and get the other young fellow to fill in. 

I am not going {o take up any more of your 
time except to say this: Yesterday Captain Gib- 
son made a remark here as to his patriotism, 
and so forth. Personally I am not going to 
question Captain Gibson's statement in so far 
as he is concerned. If it had not been for the 
fact that he mentioned his associates, and with 
reference to some of his associates I cannot for 
one understand at least some of those gentle- 
men's patriotism, for the reason that they are 
leaving organized seamen to one side. They are 
not willing even to carry white labor on their 
vessels. The vessels they are operating to-day 
in the transpacific trade are manned principally 
by Chinese and coolie labor, and when you 
go out and try to get the young men, to recruit 
them and bring them into our calling, these are 
some of the questions that are put to us, and 
I want to say, Mr. Chairman, and Mr. Secre- 
tary, when it comes to a question of patriotism, 
there is not anybody that can say that we are 
not patriots from the feet up, for the simple 
reason that there are no men to-day following 
the sea that take any more chances than the 
men in the engine-room and fireroom, because 
the main object of the torpedo is to hit the 
vessel in the waist. That is the general place 
where the engine and fire-rooms and bunkers, 
and so forth, arc located, which is supposed to 
be the weakest part of the ship, and when they 
do connect, we have not even a chance to say 
good-by to each other. 

We know those things, and we are not afraid 
of them, absolutely no, and we will follow Old 
Glory just as well as anybody else and do our 
share, and those of the men that make up our 
organizations that are not Americans will do 
their share equally as well as those that are 
Americans, and there is no other reason for 
that than they know that this country passed 
laws giving the seamen not alone of this coun- 
try but of the whole wide world, their freedom. 

In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, I just want to 
say that if we all want to be honest with each 
otiier in trying to face this issue, the way it 
ought to be faced, we will get by in good shape, 
and we won't have any cause to worry. That is 
all I want to say to you. (Applause.) 
Address by Mr. P. B. Gill. 

Mr. P. B. Gill (representing the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, Seattle, Wash.): Mr. Chairman 
and others: When I left Seattle a week ago 
there were 280 able seamen on the waiting list, 
so if any ships were delayed for the lack of able 
seamen, it was not because the men were not 
there, but because the ships were such that the 
men would not go in them. 

The question, as I understand it, before this 
conference, is to advise ourselves and the men 
how we are going to get seamen for the tre- 
mendous merchant marine being built by the 
United States Government. The chambers of 
commerce on the Pacific Coast urge that the 
Seamen's Bill, at least parts of it, be repealed, 
if not forever, at least while the war is lasting. 
T want to assure you, Mr. Secretaries and gen- 
tlemen, if that is taking place, you will see that 
the sailors, at least many hundreds of them, 
will leave the sea instead of staying behind the 
sea. There are three ways, in my opinion, of 
getting personnel for that merchant marine, and 
they have been stated here time and again. The 
surplus from Europe has been cut off. The 
American boy has got to be induced to go to 
sea. We know that if conditions are not satis- 
factory, he will not go to sea. The forecastle 
regulations, being the most important, are neces- 
sary, and I recommend that the Secretary of 
Commerce urge every shipowner in the country 
not only to pay more attention to the Seamen's 
Act, but to go into all the old vessels and tear 
out the forecastles and make them fit to live in, 
and if they want to know how the forecastle 
should be. go on one of these Norwegian ves- 
sels built in this country. They are ideal. The 
other thing is to let the seamen go to sea. I 
know lots of these men, they are good men, they 
are not spies. The third is to give the old 
shellback, who is slightly disfigured but still in 
the ring, an opportunity to get his seaman's 
certificate again. I thank you. (Applause.) 

Statement of Mr. David E. Grange. 

Mr. David E. Grange: Mr. Chairman, Mr. 

Secretary and gentlemen: First I want to say 

that I am in sympathy with the recommendation 

of Comrade Furuseth with regard to the using 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



Notice to Seamen 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carrier's Association or 
any of its alHed companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
.servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
ill tlic twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
pul)lic work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-cqiial with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
sj-stcm in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
nio'^cy shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



MANNING AMERICAN SHIPS. 
(Continued from Page 9.) 



of the Germans that have been sailing here for 
a number of years. I have been associated with 
a numlicr of those men for quite a number of 
years, and know that they are good, true men 
as far as tlie country is concerned, and there 
is no danger in using those men. 

Another thing I am going to say, gentlemen, 
1 have tlie honor of being the mouthpiece of 
one of the great American boys. I have heard 
so much about patriotism here, and so forth, 
about the American boys, that I feel it would be 
a crime if I did not bring this up to your 
attention. We have these great American boys 
dying by the thousands in the trenches to help 
make democracy safe throughout the world. 
We have a number of these American boys that 
want to do their bit by going to sea, to man 
the ships, in order to help make democracy safe. 
Those boys are the American negroes. 

Mr. Chairman, Mr. Secretary and gentlemen, 
I have found in quite a few instances where the 
ofificers of the ships have placed their prejudices 
above their patriotism in discriminating in the 
most diabolical fashion against men who are 
working aboard these ships. We have one case 
of a steamship, the "Occidental," taken over from 
the Southern Pacific and placed in the trans- 
port service. She made a voyage, and upon 
the return of that vessel, the quartermaster cap- 
tain called to Captain Johnson and said to him, 
"I want to have these colored men in the stew- 
ard's department replaced." "What is your 
reason for replacing them?" "No reason at all. 
We do not want to have the colored men there." 
If the negroes are patriotic enough, which you 
cannot question, from the first conception of 
this government — they have always stood by 
the country and have gone into the trenches 
and died — 1 think they are good enough to help 
man your .Vmcrican merchant marine, and make 
democracy safe throughout the world. I thank 
you. (Applause.) 

Address by Mr. T. J. McGlinchey. 
Mr. T. J. McGlinchey (representing Marine 
Cooks and Stewards' Association of the Pacific 
Coast, San Francisco, Cal.) : Mr. Chairman and 
Mr. Secretary and gentlemen: Representing the 
>Iarine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific Coast, I would like to say that we have 
no scarcity of men in San Francisco. Occasions 
may happen that some of these small boats 
running out of there, conditions are not what 
they ought to be, but it is pretty hard to get 
good men to fill those positions, but on these 
big ships, on these passenger ships — we have 
ships running to Australia, and we have got a 
few Germans on those ships. They have been 
in the company from 15 to 30 years. They had 
to get out of that trade on account of the fact 
that they could not sail to Australia. They 
would have been taken off and interned if they 
had done so. We have also in San Francisco 
28.S to 300 Germans, cooks, stewards, bakers 
and butchers, that are practically out of work 
there now. They have got to do the best they 
can to make a living. There are a lot of those 
men who have had their intention papers out 
for years, and they are in a pretty bad way. 
That is, they cannot follow the sea, and if they 
go down to MeNico on schooners they are liable 
to be taken in on the way back and interned on 
.^ngel Island. We have had five or six cases 
of that happen. The men have been there as 
much as two months, or may be six weeks, and 
tlie men have said, "Let them go," after finding 
out that they are harmless. 

We have lots of men coming down to our 
organization every day from other organizations 
njifown, such as the cooks and waiters' associa- 
tions up there. We have to turn those men down 
practicnllv because we have no work for them 
to do. They want to go sailing on those ships, 
but we have to tell them there is nothing to do. 
\'\'e have to look out for our own men first. 

That is the situation practically in San Fran- 
cisco. We have got lots of men. 

Another thing about it, if the Government 
should happen to call on our organization for 
help, I would like them to give us a little more 
than three or four hours' notice, if we are to 
man those ships, because it is a hard matter to 
go and get competent men in two or three 
hours. VVe have got to have time to get the 
men and get them ready to make a trip, and 
by giving us time we can assure you gentlemen 
that we can get the men. I thank you. (.Ap- 
plause.") 

Statement of Mr. Victor A. Olander. 
Mr. Victor A. Olander (Secretary of the Lake 
Seamen's Union. Chicago, 111.): Mr. Chairman 
and Mr. Secretary: T am afraid I am going to 
test your patience. T find it will be absolutely 
necessary for me, it I am to talk at all, to talk 
a little bit longer than some of the brothers who 
have been speaking to you this morning. 

T represent the sailors' division of our organ- 
ization on the Great Lakes, and T want to deal 
with facts as T know they are — not to try and 
picture any condition as I would like to have 
it be, but as it really is. 

Tt seems to be the fashion, or seems to be en- 
tirely proper, for each one as he undertakes to 
begin the discussion on this to make some refer- 
ence to his patriotism, and perhaps to his own 



particular patriotism. I do not think that my 
personal attitude on that question is of such 
great importance; it does not make really so 
much difference as to how I stand on that ques- 
tion, but it makes a great deal of difference as 
to whether or not the facts I am going to give 
you are true or correct or otherwise. As for 
myself, let me say this: I am not only willing 
to do wh:it I can for the country, but I am 
doing all I can now. I am in the service of 
botli the State and National organizations, serv- 
ing officially in both capacities, although not get- 
ting any salary for it. I do not know that that 
makes any particular difference either. I be- 
lieve that what we have got to do now is, in 
the light of our experience in the past, and our 
experience in the present, prepare for certain 
possibilities, certain possibilities in reference to 
the supply of men, and I think that the possi- 
bilities that have been mentioned are most of 
them probabilities; that we have got a serious 
l)rol)lein to face; that unless there are some 
clianges made in the method of handling ships 
we are going to find a condition where it is 
going to prove difficult to get men to go in 
the ships in sufficient number to keep the traffic 
going in tlie way it will be necessary to keep 
it going. 

Now as to the supply of men on the Great 
Lakes. We have made within the past couple 
of months something of a survey, not with the 
purpose of obtaining accurate information as to 
the number of men available, because that is 
always difficult on account of the fluctuations and 
changes, but to meet the general condition and 
find out what is governing it. And on June 1st 
I requested all of the business agents of the 
Lake Seamen's Union to make it their business 
during that entire week, and up to June 7th, to 
get around the docks, find out how the supply 
of men compared with that of former years, 
find out whether there were any less or more 
of them, and reports had indicated there were 
more. I asked them to try to find out why 
there were more, how they came, why they came 
and what kind of men they were. We found 
this condition to prevail: 

There were the usual number of sailors that 
had spent a great deal of time on the Great 
Lakes. We found among the experienced men 
an additional number coming from the building 
trades in the cities around the Great Lakes. I 
investigated that afterward and found the build- 
ing trades had had quite a slump; that in Chicago 
alone possibly 35 or 40 per cent, of them had 
been laid off and were out of work, and in those 
trades at every Lake port, and I know this from 
personal experience, because my work carries me 
among the other unions as well as the Sailors' 
Union, that practically every building trades 
union in every city on the Great Lakes of any 
size you will find experienced seamen and quali- 
fied to serve as able seamen under the law 
now, but who are not serving at sea. 

I found in addition too among the skilled 
men another group, not so very large, but still 
some, who had come to the (jreat Lakes this 
vear frankly to escape the submarine peril. 
They had no hesitation in saying why they came. 
As to their number I do not know. We found 
some — some of our agents thought quite a num- 
ber of them, others did not believe the number 
very large. I could not reach any very clear 
conclusion as to their number, but that some 
are there is without question. 

Fourth, there was the normal supply of young 
men coming to the Great Lakes. Now that 
movement is large. They are young American 
boys, ranging in age from 17 years up to 25. 
They come every year. They do not stay. That 
that movement had been added to in two ways, 
making it larger than in former years. A num- 
ber were there believing that the merchant sea- 
men were to be exempted from the draft, being 
under the impression that the draft regulations 
would automatically exempt any man who was in 
sea service as a seaman ordinarily is; and then 
a number of others, and this last has been grow- 
ing during the last two years; I first noticed it a 
year ago, who come because of the great pub- 
lic discussion on the Seamen's Act, and who 
have reached the conclusion that living condi- 
tions on board sliip have been very materiallv 
improved and that, the ship is now a good 
place to be; they are attracted, in other words, 
to the vessels. We, on the Great Lakes, perhaps 
feel that quicker and sooner than on either 
coast, though my information on both coasts 
is that this year the number of that kind of 
boys coming is far greater than before in our 
historv. and I know is a very substantial num- 
ber. Thev come, get a taste of the actual con- 
dition and a very large number of them leave 
again. 

I do not regard the Great Lakes as standing 
alone.— I think it is a part of the country; that 
the ships up there and the men up there are a 
part of our general nation and have just as 
much responsibility in this war situation as some 
fellow down in New York — are just as ready to 
cross over into the war zone. It is as much the 
business of these men, it is as much my business 
as a citizen, to see that the traffic into the war 
zone is kept open as it is the business of the 
men in New York. Boston, Philadelphia or 
other ports. The officials and the citizens there 
have spoken regarding the Lakes as isolated, as 
having no other problem than simply to keep 
iron ore moving down the Lakes and coal mov- 



ing up. If that is the only problem to be con- 
sidered, if that is what those building ships there 
want to play with, then I cannot seal with them, 
because to me that is not the biggest part of the 
question. So whatever I have to say with ref- 
erence to the Lakes, gentlemen, is said in refer- 
ence to the war needs of the nation carrying that 
problem into the war zone, and not simply to 
transport iron and coal upon perfectly safe 
waters. .And I would not want to appeal to the 
men up there simply on that basis of iron ore 
and coal in a safe trade. I believe those men 
should have the question of going into the 
war zone put up to them; that unless you do it, 
unless that is done, the trade into the war zone 
ultimately is going to be seriously handicapped 
and hampered for the lack of men willing to face 
the perils there. 

The problem, as I see it, is to keep in con- 
tinuous operation under conditions more difficult 
and hazardous than we have ever faced before 
a larger fleet than we have ever had before, 
and that problem cannot be sneered at; it has 
got to be looked squarely in the face. 

To-day, then, we have got to retain the seamen 
we now have, and there are some obstacles in 
the way of that. We have got to get more 
seamen, and as we go on with it I believe we 
will be untrue to our country unless we try to 
get more native .American seamen. It is all 
very well to talk about getting the boy to sea, 
everybody agrees on that, but I think the time 
comes now because of the inmiediate needs that 
have come up when we have got to put our- 
selves to that problem with the idea of an 
immediate solution of it, and since the passage 
of the Seaman's Act I do not believe the solu- 
tion is particularly difficult to find. I believe 
we are on the high road to it now, particularly 
here on the Atlantic coast. 

Now as to the Great Lakes, particularly with 
reference to the supply of seamen available for 
the country generally. I should like again to 
repeat that when I speak of the Great Lakes I 
have not isolated the Great Lakes; they are a 
part of the United States and I am not talking 
as a sailor of the Great Lakes but as a citizen 
of the United States having in view the needs 
of the entire country. There is on the Great 
Lakes a condition different from that obtaining 
on either coast, or different from that which has 
nl)taincd on either coast up to the present. 

We, in the Lake trade, have positions open 
to the .American boy, wide open to him, obtain- 
ing on both the deck and in the fireroom, and 
the number — I am speaking of positions, actual 
berths on board ship, to the number of 5260, as 
1 figure it, and something over 6600 when we 
include the steward's department. Those posi- 
tions are wide open now; they do not have to 
be created. They were absolutely valueless so 
far as the fire hole and the deck was concerned 
up to the present Seamen's Act, but when that 
law went on the statute books it provided that 
the practice, a practice entirely confined to the 
Cireat Lakes and existing nowhere else in the 
world, of compelling a man to serve alternately 
on deck and in the fire hole as deckhand and 
coalpasser combined, had to be stopped, and it 
has been stopped. There are so few cases of 
the old practice remaining on the Great Lakes 
that they are only sufficient to serve as the ex- 
ceptions that prove the general rule of putting 
a stop to that practice. So now there is nothing 
in the way, nothing really substantial that cannot 
be changed very readily, of making those posi- 
tions really useful. Under the old condition, 
existing previous to the Seamen's Act, the men 
came, the)' came in great numbers each year. 
To what extent T may perhaps give you some 
illustration by quoting to you some figures that 
were reported to the Department of Commerce 
and Labor by an investigator who was sent to 
the Great Lakes in 1909 — I think his name was 
Mr. Sharon, as I remember. He found from 
the figures of the Lake Carriers' .Association, that 
is the big association of shipowners that really 
controls the policy on the Great Lakes: he had 
investigated their figures; they applied to the 
season of 1908, the year previous to the time 
he had made the investigation. Their figures 
covered the whole year. He found that about 
one-half of the vessels — I am giving a very free 
estimate there — were laid up during that year. 
In round numbers they required, to fill the 
positions of deck hands on vessels of the Lake 
Carriers' Association under the slack trade of 
that year, about 2200 men; that is to say, as- 
suming that every berth was filled and every 
man stayed on the job there would be 2200 
men employed. They were required in the 
period of six months to make 22,000 shipments 
of men in order to keep those positions filled, 
a turn over so great as to be almost unbelieva- 
ble. And of course that was not turning out 
any experienced men; nobody stayed there long 
enough, and these men were almost exclusively 
young .Xmericans. 

Now that condition obtains still on the Great 
Lakes. The International Union requested the 
Department of Labor to make an investigation 
into the Great Lakes situation, particularly with 
reference to the so-called welfare plan or dis- 
charge book svstem used by that association. 
That investigation I know has been made be- 
cause the investigator called upon me for some 
information. I urged him at the time to get 
the figures of ships in that association, the Lake 
Carriers' .Association, for last year if he could 
do so. The year had then been completed, — 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



it is, of course, the last year for which we 
can get figures for a complete year. I assume 
he has done so and that those figures are 
available to the Department of Labor and the 
Department of Commerce. I do not know what 
information he obtained, but I do know the 
conditions there sufficiently well so that I feel 
warranted in saying that this condition which 
prevailed in 1908 still obtains; that here and 
there on the ships you will find a change and 
these young fellows remaining really with an 
idea of learning the business and staying in it, 
but th.at in the great mass of vessels that does 
not obtain and that the great turn over in 
shift continues now to about the same degree it 
did always previous to the enactment of this 
law, because of the failure to do some things 
very necessary in order to steady down that 
situation, and it will not cost the shipowners 
anything in dollars and cents to do it, or if 
it does it will cost them very little. On the 
Great Lakes, as a general thing, the forecastles 
are in somewhat better shape than on the coast, 
and it is not going to be a great job to put 
them in shape so those young boys will stay in 
them. Other arrangements have got to be 
made in the arrangement of crews, not for in- 
crease, because in our case the plan of the 
crew already provides for the entrance of the 
boy. In a steamer carrying ten men on deck 
nne-half of them are experienced men and the 
other half are young, green men. That is 
the way we operate now. The experienced men 
remain with the ship, while the young fellows 
that ought to stay to become seamen will, I 
tliink, hold their jobs on an average of about 
tliree weeks apiece and then disappear. The 
situation on the Lakes now, at this time of 
great need, is simply this, and I am not accus- 
ing anyone of doing this intentionally, it is 
simply a condition that has existed there for 
years, that thousands upon thousands of young 
.Americans are brought to the Lakes, or come 
to the Lakes, rather, taken on board of the 
ships, become disgusted with sea life and are 
sent back on shore to tell others to remain 
aw-ay, and that at a time when the Nation 
faces a need for seamen who have no other 
allegiance except that which they hold to their 
country, to our country, and who, if things are 
going to go along right have got to be willing 
to sacrifice their lives for the country. 

I submit that the time has come now when 
that kind of a condition ought to be changed 
in some way, and I am not speaking now as 
a representative of the Seamen's Union par- 
ticularly when I give voice to that particular 
sentence, but as a citizen of this country, real- 
izing its needs, knowing as my experience as 
an officer of the union and as a sailor just 
v/hat this condition is and what ought to be 
done to change it. 

That great body of water up there ought to 
serve as a training station and a supply station 
for vessels going into the war zone. Immediate 
steps should, I believe, be taken to arouse 
among the men and instill in them the neces- 
sary spirit and understanding of what is going 
on so that they will be willing to leave what- 
ever of safety there is in the condition up 
there and face the more desperate condition 
that we find going out of the Atlantic coast 
ports and over into the war zone. 

Briefly going over some necessary changes, 
that is one very vital one; it has to do with 
the relations between the men generally and 
their employers. I want to touch upon that a 
little later on. Leaving that aside for the 
moment I come to some of the things on board 
ship that necessarily must be changed if we 
are to get any results. Under the present 
practice on the Great Lakes, and it is a prac- 
tice that lives from the old times, the deckhand 
in the estimation of the rest of the crew is 
considered to be what we usually call a 
"hobo," in spite of the fact he is usually a 
well set-up man, just away from home a few 
davs. cleanly, but because of practices which 
existed years ago on the Great Lakes, he still 
bears in the estimation of the rest of the crew 
something in the way the character of a tramp, 
and he is not expected to be equipped for sea 
service any better than a tramp is. 

For instance, here is the condition on most 
of the vessels, and it is one the union is taking 
notice of, but we cannot cure it alone, — if the 
deckhand comes nboard with sea boots and oil 
skins and sufficient clothes to keep him dry 
in wet weather and keep him fairly comfortable 
and warm in cold weather, he is sneered at and 
ridiculed. You fellows who have sailed on the 
Great Lakes know that is the condition, that 
no effort is being made to overcome that, it 
can be overcome and it is very essential that 
it should be overcome, because you are not 
going to be able to keep the American boy at 
sea if you give him to understand he has got 
to come aboard ship as a tramp, a hobo and a 
bum: you have got to instil a different spirit 
in all the men. We can take care of that so 
far as the members of our union are concerned. 
The officers, in so far as thev have been per- 
mitted to organize on the Great Lakes, and 
their right is being challenged constantly by 
the Lake Carriers' .Association, can take care 
of it so far as the membership of the men in 
their organization is concerned, and between 
us, where we can reach men together, we can 
do a great deal. _ The same is true with refer- 
ence to the Engineers' Association, and I have 



no hesitation in saying what I am saying in 
reference to that, though I do not pretend to 
speak for either one of them, but I do know 
their feelings on this particular situation. 
(To be Continued.) 



OWNERSHIP AND DEMOCRACY. 

(By Scott Nearing.) 



Th present system of land ownership in 
the United States was justified on the 
ground that it would serve as the economic 
background for a true democracy. The 
very foundation of the American Com- 
monwealth was to be "every man a farm 
and every farm a man." There was to be 
no citizen who could not avail himself of 
this opportunity. 

The land was abundant — "exhaustless" — 
the colonists said. As late as 1832 Henry 
Clay could say in a discussion on the 
Public Lands, "We should rejoice that this 
bountiful resource (public land) possessed 
by our country, remains in almost undi- 
minished quantity, notwithstanding so 
many new and flourishing States have 
sprung' up in the wilderness and so many 
thoitsands of families have been accom- 
modated." Later in the same speech he 
said, regarding the public lands, "They 
are liberally ofifered — in exhaitstless quan- 
tities, and at moderate prices, enriching in- 
dividuals and tending to the rapid improve- 
ment of the country." 

The land seemed exhaustless. Who 
could dream that the primitive endless for- 
ests would one day disappear? That the 
stream of human life would overflow the 
continent from shore to shore? 

All history was back of the idea of in- 
dividual land ownership. Whenever a na- 
tion grew, in which each man owned his 
piece of the earth, these individual job- 
owners had been able to bid defiance to 
tyranny and oppression. Democracy flour- 
ishes wherever there is an economic basis 
for the independence which each man feels 
that he has a right to demand, but which 
he cannot hope to assert so long as another 
man owns his job. 

European Feudalism concentrated the 
ownership of practically all of the land in 
the hands of the ruling class. The pope, 
the king, the duke, the prince — the whole 
earthly hierarchy of Church and State was 
built in a way that was calculated to place 
the economic opportunities which the own- 
ership of agricultural land afiforded, in the 
hands of a small ruling clique. Democ- 
racy was impossible under that plan, so 
our forefathers moved to the United States. 

To-day, in the United States, the frontier 
has been reached, and anew, we are creat- 
ing a small group that owns the economic 
advantages — the jobs of the country. If 
that system prevails in the United States, 
democracy is doomed. It is impossible to 
maintain democracy in the absence of its 
economic basis. Before America can be 
made safe for democracy, Americans must 
own the jobs at which they work. De- 
mocracy can survive on no other founda- 
tion. 



T\vcnt\- years ago the railroads of this 
country were making an average net profit 
of about $2000 per mile of road. Last year 
they made an average net profit of $.S134 per 
mile. They are now asking permission to in- 
crease freight rates. About a year ago the 
Government granted them permission to in- 
crease passenger rates, and passenger rates 
were already higher here than in any other 
civilized country of the world. , 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Teleplione Seneca 48. 
Branches: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, 111 4 E. Austin Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1814 Fourth Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

Headquarters: 

406 N. Clark Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone Main 3837. 

Branches: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 19 Main Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 47 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, Hi 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 
Relief Stations: 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo. O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. Q. Box 1365 

TACOMA. Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box <^T, 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 6 

PORTLAND, Ore 881/2 3rd Street 

EUREKA, Cal 227 First Street, P. O. Box 64 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash... 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal. ...613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 574 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 

PORTLAND, Ore 98 Second Street N. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 

BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 10 East Street 

SACRAMENTO, Cal Labor Temple 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Fruit growers in the western part 
of Colorado are securing necessary 
workers through the State free em- 
ployment agencies, according to State i 
Labor Commissioner Morrisey. 

At a conference of Northwestern 
organized printers the standardiza- 
tion of wage scales and working 
hours, with contract dates beginning 
and ending at the same time, was 
urged. 

A bunch of working girls at the 
Trenton (N. J.) shirt factory, on 
strike for living conditions, have 
been enjoined on the plea of the 
company that the girls arc "inter- 
fering with business." 

Nearly four thousand shopmen 
employed by the Boston and Maine 
Railroad have raised wages after a 
short strike. The men asked for a 
flat increase of 8 cents an hour. The 
settlement provides that rates will 
he advanced S cents an hour and the 
disputed 3 cents submitted to arbi- 
tration. 

The barbers at Livingston, Mont., 
at present are charging patrons 50 
cents for a hair cut, SO cents for 
massage, 50 cents and $1 for sham- 
poo, 25 cents for shave, and 15 to 
25 cents for tonics. Journeymen re- 
ceive $21 per week, and 60 per cent, 
over $35 of their receipts. Hours 
from 8 a. m. to 7 p. m. and 9 p. m. 
Saturdays. 

Women are being substituted for 
daafted men, and are paid one-half 
the wages paid men, reports Earl 
Ferguson, State Organizer of the 
Texas State Federation of Labor. 
"Organized labor should use every 
influence to remedy this evil," says 
Ferguson, "even to the extent of 
withdrawing their patronage from 
firms of this kind." 

An injunction has been issued 
against striking waiters of Memphis, 
who dernand a minimum wage of $14 
for a week of seven days, eleven 
hours a day. Several restaurants 
have signed this scale, while others 
have pronounced it "unreasonable" 
and have rushed to the court for 
protection. These concerns object 
to being classified as unfair. 

At the recent annual convention of 
the Massachusetts State Branch, A. 
F. of L., the Legislative Committee 
was instructed to present a bill to 
the next General Assembly for a 
forty-eight-hour work week for 
women. Delegates were urged to 
vork through their local and central 
organizations to defeat the members 
of the House and Senate who de- 
feated this measure at the last ses- 
sion and who are now seeking re- 
election. 

The officials of the Timber Work- 
ers' Union at Tacoma, Wash., assert 
that fully 85 per cent, of the em- 
ployes of the twenty-one mills and 
the woodworking establishments in 
Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner and Nill- 
luirst who are working, are members 
of the union. The ten-hour mills 
are finding it difficult to secure men 
to work the long hours. One feature 
that promises added strength to the 
Timber Workers' Union and will 
have a deciding influence in further 
establishing the eight-hour day in 
the lumbering industry is the fact 
that large numbers of Japanese 
workers are applying for member- 
ship in the union. The decision of 
the union to admit the -Japanese will 
deprive the ten-hour mills of a 
strong ally, as heretofore they have 
depended largely on the Nipponese 
laborers to break strikes. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phon* Elliott 11M 



EatabllBhed 1S90 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Dat* Method! In Modern Navigation and Nautical Aitronomy 

COMPASSKS ADJUSTED 

500-1 SECURITIES BLDG. Next to U. S. Steamihip Inapectors' Office 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle, Wath., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrived. 



Abolin, K. 
Anderson, J. E. 

-1149 
Andersen, Peter 
Andersen, A. C. 



LIndstrom, T. 
Lowuln, J. 
Lottman, H. O. 
Luther, Alfred 
Lackey, C. 



Anderson, Barney Larsen, Emll 

Anderson, H. -822 Lundberg, C. 

Andersen, And. I^arsen, M. B. L. 

Arklof, Knut -1821 Llndecker, C. 

Andersen, Julius Larsen, EJernd 
Andersen, K. P. (package) 

Andersen, John Larsen, C. -1516 

Anderson, Martin Macdonald, H. 

Abrahamsen, W. Maybaum, W. 

Beling, O. McPherson, J. R. 

Birkland, H. J. McKeoun, F. 

Brown, C. L. Meier, Geo. 

Bretsen, Joe Mitchell, A. 

Brandt, Otto Mortensen, Aug. 

Bohm. Frank Morken, M. 

Bramley, T. Monsen, B. 

Berkman, O. Mortensen, J. B. 

Bentte, Paul Magi. John 

Butta. W. McNlcol, G. C. 

Bertelsen, B. Madsen. Johannus 

Bensen, Helge Mlkkelsen, K. -1620 

Broundl, F. Mostad, Leonard 

Busch, H. Mlkkelsen, P. 

Bjurnson, J. Madsen, C. H. 

(package) Matson, Eric 

Benedict, Joe McT^aughlin, Dan 

Berglln, G. H. Nelsson, A. W. 

Borvlk. C. Eliasen Nellsen, H. L. -1258 

Callinen, F. Nelsen, Senn Fr. 

rarlson. J. -861 Nelson, Joseph 

Christiansen. John Nelsen, F. H. -l.'?47 

Connovator, T. St. Nerlln, Geo. 

Conge, H. Nordstrom. G. E. 

Cunningham, Geo. Nordfelt, T. F. 

Cadogan, J. Nelsen, N. P. 

Caravan. W. W. Nilsen. N. B. 

De Wall, S. Nelson. M. -1330 

Desmond, J. P. Newman. John 

Dreyer, Jack Newland, E. 

Duyherty, P. J. Naro, J. 

Droje. H. Nelsen, L. 

Darrow. H. Olsen. Eric 

Eckstrom. Geo. Olsen. C. A. -1302 

Else. Karl Olsen, A. M. 

Ellingsen, Erling Olsen, E. O. 

Eriksen, Sam Olsen, Julius 

Erlandsen. Anton Olsen, Elmar 

Eriksen, E. B. Olsen. K. -6824 

Ekholm, Gus Omholt, 1,. 

Eriksen. Alfred Orell, A. 

Eriksen, E. Olsen. C. Otto 

Erikson, Jo